Inclusive Busines...
Follow
Find tag "USA"
20.1K views | +20 today
Inclusive Business and Impact Investing
The first and highest rated scoop.it blog on sustainable and inclusive business and impact investing. The curations are mine.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Development studies and int'l cooperation
Scoop.it!

A Radically Different Way of Bringing US Aid to Pakistan

A Radically Different Way of Bringing US Aid to Pakistan | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

Traditional aid programs are struggling in the country. But a less conventional program with less conventional goals seems to show a better model....


Via Paola Rattu
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What America Manufactures

What America Manufactures | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

"It's a myth that the U.S. doesn't make anything anymore."  The U.S. economy still produces more through manufacturing tangible goods ($1.5 trillion) than it does in providing services ($600 billion) for the international market.  The maps and graphs in this article are great teaching materials.  The impact of NAFTA is shown powerfully in the regionalization of U.S. trade partners, making this salient material for a discussion on supranationalism as well.   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 11, 2013 7:09 PM


This is great because now we can witness the creation of jobs in the country which can help the country get out of the depression that it is in. it also can help people get jobs and not have to worry about if there unemployment check is going enough to cover there expenses. Also people that are working are less likely to get depressed because they are not trapped in there homes because now they have something that is distracting them. But the United States is seeing a great improvement because of all the things being manufactured here. One good example is the Honda accord power plant and the ford motor company plant and even general motors in Detroit. all of these companies is helping the Americans get back into the workforce.

Nicholas Patrie's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:05 PM

i was surprised to see that our country still exports so many products. What i find even more surprising is that the top countries that are buying our good are our bordering countries, Canada and Mexico. As much Petroleum we receive from the middle east we still are exporting so much of it to Canada and Mexico. It seems that foreign cars such as ones from Japan are taking over the industry yet our top export to Canada is car parts. it is good to see that America still exports.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 12:03 PM

I was surprised and reassured to see how much the U.S. exports to other parts of the world.  I was unaware that the U.S exported to China because we physically surrounded by items made in China. Although our imports exceed exports, we are still producing,

 

Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Alisa Miller shares the news about the news

TED Talks Alisa Miller, head of Public Radio International, talks about why -- though we want to know more about the world than ever -- the US media is actually showing less. Eye-opening stats and graphs.

 

The U.S. News is remarkably USA-centric.   How does the media influence our perception of the world? 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
LMullen's comment, February 2, 2012 5:28 PM
I really don't find this surprising.
Tejahne Malone's comment, May 18, 2012 4:47 PM
Our world is messed up. just because something is cheaper doesnt mean it is better. we should take actions in to our own hands and find out about global issues to increase our own knowledge for our own benefit
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 19, 2013 11:30 AM

The U.S. News is remarkably USA-centric.   How does the media influence our perception of the world?

Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Interactive Map: The Economy Where You Live

Interactive Map: The Economy Where You Live | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it
The fallout from the recession has cut deeply into the housing security, employment and income of many Americans. But some parts of the country are clearly faring better than others.

 

Do your own local and regional analysis of household incomes, unemployment and foreclosure rates.  What patterns surprise you?  What geographic factors explain the economic situation?     


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

For first time since Depression, more Mexicans leave U.S. than enter

For first time since Depression, more Mexicans leave U.S. than enter | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it
A study sees a decline in immigration to the United States from Mexico after tightened border control, increased deportations, a flagging U.S. economy and a declining Mexican birthrate.

 

The wave of immigrants coming into the USA is something of the past. Push factors: Why are more Mexicans choosing to stay in Mexico?  Pull factors: Why is the United States less on an option for many would-be migrants these days?  Cross-border issues: How are issues on both sides of the border changing these patterns? 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mikaela Kennedy's curator insight, February 7, 2013 5:48 PM

One of the last lines in this really stood out to me: "Mexicans would rather be in a precarious situation than a situation of fear."  I feel as though that is true for all people living on earth. 

James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 2014 11:59 AM

(Mexico topic 3)

   Instead of focusing on the reasons behind the decline/reversal in Mexico-America immigration in my first topic, for this article I would like to mention how the facts cited differ so greatly from what is being broadcast and inferred from larger news agencies. Especially within the last few months, I would've thought that Mexican immigration into the US would be at an all-time high. Never would I have previously guessed that it would be closer to a net gain of near 0 (or even a net loss). This goes to show how news agencies "cater" to certain demographics of people and what they want to hear. To me it's like a lobbyist recruitment, trying to gain more supporters of a specific cause in hopes of achieving a specific goal.

   On a separate note, I was interested in the mention of how certain researchers believe the pattern could shift again once the US economy begins to further recover. I wonder if a rise in immigration would actually happen, given that Mexico's economy is now more developed and providing more opportunity? That's something to think about...

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 18, 2014 11:54 AM
According to the report, the Mexican-born population, which had been increasing since 1970, peaked at 12.6 million in 2007 and has dropped to 12 million since then.-WashingtonPost

This is a staggering statistic.The tightening of border control, increase in deportations ,as well as a declining economy, have all contributed to this decrease in people coming into the U.S. from Mexico. People born in Mexico are also finding more oppurtunites at home and less desire to leave. There is no telling if this decline will be permanent or temporary, however many are speculating we will not see the strong numbers we saw in the 20th and early 21st centuries. This is a little concerning for me , I feel that when people do come to this country they should do it the leagal way ,however is it a cause for concer when the "land of oppurtunity" no longer seems to be the best choice.What is that saying about our country? Should we worry when people stop wanting to come here?

Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Development studies and int'l cooperation
Scoop.it!

China's not breaking the rules. It's playing a different game.

China's not breaking the rules. It's playing a different game. | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

In their Oval Office meeting earlier this week, President Obama predictably warned China's visiting president-in-waiting Xi Jinping that China must play by the rules in international trade. It sounded right and fair and slightly tough as it was carefully crafted to do by top White House political advisers, and the president may even believe it. But he shouldn't have said it.

 

The fundamental premise of all U.S trade/globalization talks and discussions is that the participants are all playing the same game of liberal, neo-classical, free market, resource endowment and comparative advantage based free trade. This is a totally false premise that immediately gets the discussions off in irrelevant directions. The global economy is, in fact, sharply divided between those who are playing the free trade game and those who are playing some form of mercantilism. Of course, there is a spectrum of attitudes and policies...

 


Via Paola Rattu
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Development studies and int'l cooperation
Scoop.it!

Development That Works: OPIC Earns Money for the Treasury While Funding Development Throughout the World

Development That Works: OPIC Earns Money for the Treasury While Funding Development Throughout the World | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

The U.S. Government's development finance institution is the Overseas Private Investment Corporation. OPIC builds upon a known commodity -- our entrepreneurial spirit -- and puts it at the center of our outreach to the developing world.

 

OPIC is above-all an organization dedicated to free markets, and it has become one of America's most agile foreign policy instruments. It enhances U.S. foreign policy by bringing American for-profit investment into the riskiest regions and proving that for-profit American style development works.

 

The Overseas Private Investment Corporation provides loans, loan guarantees, political risk insurance and support for investment funds to Americans who invest in strife-ridden countries. OPIC helps extend the free market via a commercial enterprise, and they do it all while making money for the U.S. Taxpayer.

I am grateful to serve on the OPIC Board of Directors, and want to explain a few ways that OPIC works.....


Via Paola Rattu
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What’s your local HDI (human development index)?

What’s your local HDI (human development index)? | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

"A recently-released online tool enables Californians to see where they stand on a “human development index” – a composite measure of health, knowledge and standard of living developed by the American Human Development Project of the Social Sciences..." 

This is cool.  Instead of aggregating the data at the country level and comparing countries, we can see differences in local levels of human development.  Students see patterns of socio-economics and development vividly, and in an intensely local way tailored to their regional frame of reference.   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Tracey Sarvis's curator insight, November 9, 2014 8:20 AM

Development and HDI