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27% of emails are opened on mobile devices: stats

27% of emails are opened on mobile devices: stats | Inciteful Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it
Further proof of the importance of mobile for email marketers is provided by new stats showing that more than a quarter of emails are opened on phones and tablets. (The Funky Umbrella can make your email marketing and website mobile device-friendly.
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Context Marketing? Different Than Content Marketing?

Context Marketing? Different Than Content Marketing? | Inciteful Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it
We've all heard the term content marketing. Content marketing is one of the fundamental mechanisms of inbound marketing, promoted by companies like Hubspot. But at Inbound 2012, Hubspot was also talking about context marketing. While not a new term, context marketing is something Hubspot hasn’t made a central part of its success formula in the past. So what is context marketing and why is it important?

Via Alex Butler
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Rescooped by Frank X. Powers from 4- PATIENT EMPOWERMENT & E-PATIENT by PHARMAGEEK
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How do patients choose doctors online: Cartoon

How do patients choose doctors online: Cartoon | Inciteful Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it

Here is a Webicina image explaining how patients might choose doctors online even nowadays: (Merci!


Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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IBM's reinvention should inspire flat pharma businesses

IBM's reinvention should inspire flat pharma businesses | Inciteful Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it

The pharmaceutical giants look remarkably similar to the IBM of the late 80′s and early 90′s.

 

For those of us who remember the IBM of that era, this is bad news.

 

They can continue the path of the railroad industry early in the 20th century. Alternatively, they can look to the path IBM took when its future prospects were grim.

 

Remarkably, IBM demonstrated how it’s possible for a large company to shift from a product-centric culture to a customer and service centered company.

 

The writing is on the wall for pharma companies: they will succeed or fail based not on how many drugs they sell, but on how well their offerings improve health outcomes.


Via Andrew Spong
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27% of emails are opened on mobile devices: stats

27% of emails are opened on mobile devices: stats | Inciteful Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it
Further proof of the importance of mobile for email marketers is provided by new stats showing that more than a quarter of emails are opened on phones and tablets. (The Funky Umbrella can make your email marketing and website mobile device-friendly.
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Digital Pharma: It's not about the brand website | InPharm

Digital Pharma: It's not about the brand website | InPharm | Inciteful Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it
The last few years have seen an explosion of interest in digital marketing in the pharma sector, reflecting the wider revolution brought about by sites like Facebook and Twitter, and mobile devices in the shape of smartphones and iPads.
But has marketing to pharma’s core audience of healthcare professionals really been revolutionised by digital media?

Via Alex Butler
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Medical Communication Strategies: Top 10 Pharma Marketing Blogs Globally

Medical Communication Strategies: Top 10 Pharma Marketing Blogs Globally | Inciteful Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it
RT @MrPug94: RT @myers_mel: Top 10 Pharma Marketing Blogs Globally. http://t.co/rEZ4rzN7. via MedCom Strategies.

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Medical-device makers fight tax - Columbus Dispatch

Medical-device makers fight tax - Columbus Dispatch | Inciteful Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it
Medical-device makers fight taxColumbus DispatchPat Tiberi and Jim Renacci, medical-device maker Walter Rosebrough, Cardinal Health Vice President Tony Dennis and Stephen Ubl, CEO of AdvaMed, the largest trade group representing medical-technology...
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Twitter: A New Age In The Doctor Patient Relationship

Twitter: A New Age In The Doctor Patient Relationship | Inciteful Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it

When medicine met the Internet, there was a global expansion of medical information: some evidence based and accurate, others misleading and false; for professionals and patients alike to peruse and usurp. Soon, there were online appointments and the ever controversial doctor rating websites. Now, hundreds of millions of people take to the Internet every day to post their own views and stories in an endless sea of social media websites.

 

Twitter, a free microblogging website inviting users, or tweeters, to post 140 character tweets, now boasts 500 million active users. Whilst it may have started as being a portal into the celebrity world, Twitter€™s demographics have boomed and now includes many doctors and those soon to be.

 

The buzz of the social media hive is like nothing else and the growth of social media giants like Twitter as well as Facebook with over 900 million active users poses a new question. What role does social media play in the modern day doctor-patient relationship?

I argue that whether we like it or not, their unification has already begun.

 

Social media has a place in almost every home. Laptops, iPads, tablets and now, in the palm of their hands, people accessing Twitter and Facebook on the go using their smartphones. More and more doctors are emerging on Twitter, some gaining an impressive following. Whilst most simply tweet their day to day lives, some make political references and use hashtags to contribute to debate and protest.

 

Some doctors, including well known TV doctors, take Twitter one step further and answer medical questions and even recommend diagnoses and treatments.

 

If you are experienced, knowledgeable and willing to answer such questions responsibly, what is the problem? It offers an excellent way for people to gain simple advice quickly and easily, and has great potential for engaging with young people. I feel the problem is finding a place to draw the line. A consultant offering an answer evokes a different response to if a medical query was answered by an inexperienced Foundation Year doctor.

 

If an eight minute GP consultation is a time limited struggle, a 140 character tweet with no physical examination is not very insightful. As well as issues regarding false information and patient safety there are concerns regarding data protection. How can we keep patient information confidential if we plaster it over Twitter? A system with doctors communicating medical information to patients over social media appears chaotic and impossible to archive

.

To include Twitter as a middle man between doctor and patient has the potential to negatively impact not only the patient, but the doctor. Twitter offers a platform to patients, which some inevitably will use to complain and may choose to name their doctor specifically. Concerns regarding doctor rating websites have been well publicised and Twitter offers a new way for patients to vent their anger about named doctors publically.

 

Where will Twitter take us? Could we one day see doctors and patients communicating blood results via security encrypted social media sites? Will patients be logging on to tweet their GP their morning blood pressure check or BM result?

 

Social media is expanding daily, as does our capability to employ it in our working lives. I argue that Twitter is a new tool in medicine that we can use to reach out patients, to pool opinions, and shape the health service and methods of practice.

 


Via PEAS Healthcare, Parag Vora, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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New ad model fosters pharmas leap to digital, publisher finds

New ad model fosters pharmas leap to digital, publisher finds | Inciteful Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it
Statistics show medical professionals are migrating toward iPads. Now, one medical journal publisher says, advertisers have followed.

Wolters Kluwer, publisher of medical journals and texts, says 50 companies, including five out of the top 20 pharmaceutical companies and six out of the top 20 device companies, have committed to advertise in 12 medical journals apps offered by the company.

 

“We're saying to advertisers, ‘We have a new way to reach physicians,'” said Karen Abramson, president and CEO of Wolters Kluwer Health Medical Research, which includes Lippincott Williams and Wilkins journals as well as the Ovid print titles.

To be sure, adapting ads for any new medium needs to be carefully considered in light of FDA regulations, and many advertisers have been hesitant to enter the new space, says Wolters Kluwer.

To encourage them to make the jump to advertise on its apps, the publisher launched a new ad model. In January it stopped offering advertisers the option of purchasing print-only ads. Print and digital apps are bundled together at one price. The decision “is aimed at helping advertisers innovate their marketing strategies and benefit from the opportunity to offer ads in multimedia format (videos, tutorials on products, etc.),” said a spokesperson.

 

Meanwhile, the firm has migrated 52 of its journals, which cover new surgical techniques and medical advances, onto the iPad. Preliminary data across six specialties show the average amount of time an iPad reader spends interacting with an ad is on average between 10 and 40 seconds. Also, the addition of the iPad increased digital (web and app) page views between 30% and 70%. (The company said it doesn't have metrics on the subsequent digital ad engagement rate, or on how many seconds readers typically spend viewing print ads for its journals.)

 

“When someone is reading a print page, they're very unlikely to spend 10-30 seconds viewing an ad,” Abramson said. “The apps are able to engage their readers in a way that, quite frankly, journals in the print world cannot.”

 

Several of its journals now feature ads running on their iPad apps that allow readers to access video content. The videos display, in some cases, manufacturer presentation slides and live patient demonstrations.

 

An ad for Acorda Therapeutics drug Ampyra (dalfampridine), appearing in the July 10 issue of Neurology, offers a video demonstrating the increased motor skills of a patient with multiple sclerosis (the drug is approved to improve walking in patients with MS). The ad is part of a campaign the drugmaker has been running since January. An earlier ad had offered users an animation of Ampyra's mode of action.

 

On the device side, the June issue of Journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons features on its iPad app a full-page ad from device firm LifeCell with a play button taking users to a video showing LifeCell's SPY Elite System during an actual surgery.

Because the app drives a different customer experience than print, getting more pharma and device advertisers to take advantage of the medium will require education. “We are teaching advertisers about the notion of audience and not just print circulation, and that's been very appealing,” Abramson continued. “The typical behavior around print is you read it, put it on the shelf and don't come back. The behavior around digital is you repeat and repeat and repeat your view of the journal.”

 

On average, Wolters Kluwer has found, readers are coming back to a digitally published journal issue nine times, and peak use for an issue happens three to four weeks after the issue is published. There is a “long tail and a lot of repeat use, so you get considerably more exposure when you deal with a digital audience…than when dealing with a static print circulation.”


Via Thibaud Guymard
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Things to consider when creating a business logo - by Suzanne Rose - Helium

A business logo can help you attract customers, distinguish yourself to clients and more.  It will be the symbol of your company, and you wan..., Suzanne Rose (What to consider when creating a business logo http://t.co/RmCh7aA7...)...
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Community Is Something You DO

Community Is Something You DO | Inciteful Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it
The definition of community is a social, religious, occupational, or other group sharing common characteristics or interests and perceived or perceiving itself as distinct in some...
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Top 3 challenges for digital #pharma marketers: - DigiPharm - Digital Marketing Strategies for Pharmaceutical Products

Top 3 challenges for digital #pharma marketing http://t.co/YjeqUyGi #hcsmeu #digipharm...

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Advertising is Hated — and Failing | PandoDaily

Advertising is Hated — and Failing | PandoDaily | Inciteful Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it
People keep trying to convince themselves that the flexibility and interactivity of the Web will save advertising, that they can gimmick their way to profitability. Pop-ups, pop-unders, overlays, interstitials.
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Still in the dark about the Sunshine Act: CMS delays data collection for doc payments | MassDevice - Medical Device Industry News

Still in the dark about the Sunshine Act: CMS delays data collection for doc payments | MassDevice - Medical Device Industry News | Inciteful Healthcare Marketing | Scoop.it
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid push back implementation of the Physician Payment Sunshine Act as the agency takes time to address more than 300 comments submitted on the proposed gift reporting rule.
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