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"IN-novation"
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Developing 21st Century Critical Thinkers - Infographic

Developing 21st Century Critical Thinkers - Infographic | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it
Download an 11X17 version of the Developing 21st Century Critical Thinkers Infographic by Mentoring Minds.com.

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Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA's comment, September 26, 2013 9:05 PM
Mathy: Definitely the time to make some changes...
Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA's comment, September 26, 2013 9:08 PM
Diane: I agree, the Flipped Classroom is a great strategy to engage the students!
Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA's comment, September 26, 2013 9:08 PM
Diane: I agree, the Flipped Classroom is a great strategy to engage the students!
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Creating your Own Luck to Build a Successful Innovation Culture, the Innovator's Mindset

Creating your Own Luck to Build a Successful Innovation Culture, the Innovator's Mindset | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it

"Is it a mindset of creating your own luck that sets innovative organizations apart?"

 

Do the featured characteristics of innovative cultures in organizations follow the make-your-own-luck characteristics listed in this article?   See if you agree that it's about having a certain mindset translated to culture:

 

Excerpted:

 

...Having a positive, innovator’s mindset actually CREATES success, and luck.

 

In The Luck Factor (Miramax, 2003) professor Richard Wiseman, from the University of Hertfordshire, details his research providing the following insight – Luck (or success) comes to those who embrace and embody four essential principles:

 

‣ Creating luck by noticing and acting on opportunities,
‣ Expecting that one can create luck through perseverance,
‣ Making decisions which are informed by the well honed intuition, and
‣ Resisting the negative by finding and even creating the bright side of every situation

 

The post author, Bradley Bendle, also cites several other recent innovation books including a model from Andy Stefanovich in Look at More (Jossey-Bass, 2011) and his five M’s framework (Mood, Mindset, Mechanisms, Measurement, Momentum.)

 

Like other posts on his site, the post is rich in citations plus the author's own spin and distillation based on his innovation readings including his view of the Innovator’s Mindset as being comprised of following six reinforcing domains:

 

1) Alertness
2) Curiousness
3) Willingness
4) Joy
5) Desire
6) Drive

 

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Better Thinking by Not Thinking: Accessing your Unconsciousness - Liz Guthridge

Better Thinking by Not Thinking:  Accessing your Unconsciousness - Liz Guthridge | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it

"Where do you do your best thinking? Anywhere but your desk, if you’re like most knowledge workers and leaders. And probably not at work either. Not thinking, but relaxing into your unconscious can produce better thinking."

 

Change colleague Liz Guthridge has a winner of a post on accessing quality thinking by simply not thinking for a spell.  Techniques of mindful meditation, rest (or siesta, as I'd prefer from my Argentine side), as well as just stepping away for a break can contribute to a fresh view and insights from the deep well of our unconscious. ~ DN

 

Excerpts:

 

_________________________

 

Individuals tend to get good ideas while driving, exercising, reading, meditating or talking to others.

_________________________

 

That’s because we automatically tap into our unconsciousness to do most of our thinking. It doesn’t require effort on our part, as David Rock explains. Even better, our unconsciousness—which can seem as vast as the Milky Way—makes powerful connections for us.

  

...Offices are not brain-friendly settings.

  

Her steps to access include:

  

1. Quiet your brain. Start by putting aside all of the electronic gadgets that stimulate you and your brain. You also may want to close your eyes.

  

2. Let your mind wander. (DN:  Mindfulness practices teaches us to observe thoughts, but to NOT engage them.)

  

3. Put yourself in a positive state. 

 

4. Do something else other than work on the issue, problem or dilemma you’re facing. 

  

===

  

Read Liz's post in full here, which includes my commentary on accessing both the Jungian appreciation of the unconcious and using tools, like the MBTI used at the second level of functioning.

 

~  Deb



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10 Favorite Systems Thinking Books of the Past 10+ Years > Change that Works

10 Favorite Systems Thinking Books of the Past 10+ Years >  Change that Works | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it

"Here's a helpful list of systems thinking books from the editor of The Systems Thinker news on Pegasus, a favorite blog spot I follow.  Systems and change are married to each other in creating change that works.

 

________________________________

    

Reality will not be still. And it cannot be taken apart! ....Relationship is everything." ~ Marilyn Ferguson

    

________________________________


I have several of these and will probably be getting the e-editions of others from this great list.


"General Systems Theory, a related modern concept

[to holism],says that each variable in any system

interacts with the other variables

so thoroughly that cause and effect

cannot be separated.


A simple variable can be both cause and effect.

Reality will not be still. And it cannot be taken apart!

You cannot understand a cell, a rat, a brain structure,

a family, a culture if you isolate it from its context.

Relationship is everything."    

- Marilyn Ferguson,  

The Aquarian Conspiracy


 

A sample from her blog post:

 

She admits Russell Ackoff writings and Senge's new edition of The Fifth Discipline go without saying as great systems thinking classics.  That said, her list includes:

 

Thinking in Systems: A Primer by Donella H. Meadows (Chelsea Green, 2008) Dana Meadows had a unique ability to take the mystery out of what can be perceived as overly complex concepts.    DN:  I have this one and carry it around on my iPad everywhere, reminding myself when I get stuck how systems can be complex without being complicated.         Business Dynamics: Systems Thinking and Modeling for a Complex World by John Sterman (McGraw-Hill/Irwin, 2000) The core textbook for learning how to apply system dynamics modeling to complex organizational challenges. Even if you aren’t interested in modeling per se, Sterman’s clear, well-written explanations of the core elements of systems thinking make it worth a look.     Limits to Growth: The 30-Year Update by Donella Meadows, Jorgen Randers, and Dennis L. Meadows (Chelsea Green, 2004) The most recent version of the influential system dynamics analysis of the impact of a rapidly growing population in a world of finite resources.

 

She's also listed several good books for children including two books by a relative of a former neighbor of mind.  Good stuff!

 

Connected Wisdom: Living Stories About Living Systems by Linda Booth Sweeney (SEED, 2009)  Her goal with two of her systems books is “to find a fun and memorable way to help kids see and understand the world of systems all around us.”

 

Read the full post here.


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Faster and more creative when solving OTHER people's problems

Faster and more creative when solving OTHER people's problems | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it
Recent research reveals that people are more capable of mental novelty when thinking on behalf of others than for themselves.

 

Great piece on enriching the field of view and other perspectives, something we also encourage in executive coaching.  

 

________________________

 

...abstract thinking leads to greater creativity. ...But in our businesses and our lives, we often do the opposite.

________________________

 

Excerpts:

 

Over the years, social scientists have found that abstract thinking leads to greater creativity. That means that if we care about innovation we need to be more abstract and therefore more distant. But in our businesses and our lives, we often do the opposite. We intensify our focus rather than widen our view. We draw closer rather than step back.

 

That's a mistake, Polman and Emich suggest. "That decisions for others are more creative than decisions for the self... should prove of considerable interest to negotiators, managers, product designers, marketers and advertisers, among many others," they write.

 

Dan Pink's suggestions, excerpted:

  

• Recruit more independent directors.   Begin with corporate governance. 

~ having independent directors on the boards of public companies. 

 

• Rethink the structure of your firm.

Perhaps loose alliances of distantly connected people

 

• Harness the power of peers.

....assemble a small group of peers – all from different industries – and gather periodically to exchange ideas and offer solutions from new perspectives.

 

• Find a problem-swapping partner.

Find a friend or colleague with whom you can occasionally swap problems...

 

• Disasssociate yourself.

Imagine you're doing it for someone else...

 

Full article here


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