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"IN-novation"
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Rescooped by Robin Martin from Change Management Resources
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10 Favorite Systems Thinking Books of the Past 10+ Years > Change that Works

10 Favorite Systems Thinking Books of the Past 10+ Years >  Change that Works | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it

"Here's a helpful list of systems thinking books from the editor of The Systems Thinker news on Pegasus, a favorite blog spot I follow.  Systems and change are married to each other in creating change that works.

 

________________________________

    

Reality will not be still. And it cannot be taken apart! ....Relationship is everything." ~ Marilyn Ferguson

    

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I have several of these and will probably be getting the e-editions of others from this great list.


"General Systems Theory, a related modern concept

[to holism],says that each variable in any system

interacts with the other variables

so thoroughly that cause and effect

cannot be separated.


A simple variable can be both cause and effect.

Reality will not be still. And it cannot be taken apart!

You cannot understand a cell, a rat, a brain structure,

a family, a culture if you isolate it from its context.

Relationship is everything."    

- Marilyn Ferguson,  

The Aquarian Conspiracy


 

A sample from her blog post:

 

She admits Russell Ackoff writings and Senge's new edition of The Fifth Discipline go without saying as great systems thinking classics.  That said, her list includes:

 

Thinking in Systems: A Primer by Donella H. Meadows (Chelsea Green, 2008) Dana Meadows had a unique ability to take the mystery out of what can be perceived as overly complex concepts.    DN:  I have this one and carry it around on my iPad everywhere, reminding myself when I get stuck how systems can be complex without being complicated.         Business Dynamics: Systems Thinking and Modeling for a Complex World by John Sterman (McGraw-Hill/Irwin, 2000) The core textbook for learning how to apply system dynamics modeling to complex organizational challenges. Even if you aren’t interested in modeling per se, Sterman’s clear, well-written explanations of the core elements of systems thinking make it worth a look.     Limits to Growth: The 30-Year Update by Donella Meadows, Jorgen Randers, and Dennis L. Meadows (Chelsea Green, 2004) The most recent version of the influential system dynamics analysis of the impact of a rapidly growing population in a world of finite resources.

 

She's also listed several good books for children including two books by a relative of a former neighbor of mind.  Good stuff!

 

Connected Wisdom: Living Stories About Living Systems by Linda Booth Sweeney (SEED, 2009)  Her goal with two of her systems books is “to find a fun and memorable way to help kids see and understand the world of systems all around us.”

 

Read the full post here.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Rescooped by Robin Martin from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Open Innovation & Organizational Boundaries, in Institutions, Will it Blend? — HBS Working Knowledge

Open Innovation & Organizational Boundaries, in Institutions, Will it Blend? — HBS Working Knowledge | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it
Open innovation, enabled by low-cost communication and the decreased costs of memory and computation, has transformed markets and social relations.

 

As the authors illustrate, it will be challenging to manage contrasting modes of innovation, and that is exactly what is needed in organizations that expect to innovate and are systemically, culturally, not set up to help this happen. 

 

 

Excerpts:

Open innovation, in contrast to firm-centered innovation, is radically decentralized, peer based, and includes intrinsic and pro-social motives.

 

The authors of this working paper use in-depth examples from Apple, NASA, and Lego to argue that open innovation will at least complement, if not increasingly substitute for, more traditional innovation modes.

 

This is within the contexts of increasing modularity and decreased communication costs.   (DN:  Just look at digital communication today.  Think ahead 4 months to 1 year of what's next.)

 

Emerging theories must be informed by these contrasting innovation modes and the implications for governance, incentives, intellectual property, managerial choice, professional and organizational identity, and organizational cultures.

 

Key concepts include:

 

Leaders and senior teams can take advantage of contrasting innovation modes, paradoxical organizational requirements, and associated dynamic boundaries.

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Leaders need to execute strategic choices with the systems, structures, incentives, cultures, and boundaries tailored to open and firm-based innovation modes. . Multiple types of boundaries will increasingly be employed to manage innovation, from traditional to complex intra firm boundaries (such as ambidextrous designs), to webs of interdependence with partners and potentially anonymous communities. . Senior teams must build their capabilities to deal with contradictions as well as their organization's ability to embrance contradictions.  

 

A link to the full working paper, downloadable by Assistant Professor, Karim R. Lakhani & colleague is here.

 

Source:  Karim R. Lakhani is an assistant professor in the Technology and Operations Management unit at Harvard Business School.  

 

This link was also recommended by Jeffrey DeGraff at the University of Michigan Ross School of Business, and I also think it's right on, even if the language is quite academic.  It will make you think about your institutional systems, and refresh your vocabulary.    ~  Deb


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7 Steps to a Culture of Innovation | Josh Linkner, Michigan Success Story

7 Steps to a Culture of Innovation | Josh Linkner, Michigan Success Story | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it

"Most companies fail to unleash their most valuable resources: human creativity, imagination, and original thinking. They lack a systematic approach to building a culture of innovation, and then wonder why they keep getting beaten to the punch."

 

Josh speaks from tested experience.  His 7 steps include:

 

1. Fuel Passion

2. Celebrate Ideas

3. Foster Autonomy

4. Encourage Courage

 

Josh Linkner is a five-time entrepreneur, venture capitalist, professor, and The New York Times best-selling author of Disciplined Dreaming – A Proven System to Drive Breakthrough Creativity. You can read more about him at www.JoshLinkner.com.


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