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"IN-novation"
Just "IN" or has it been around and we've just given it a name?
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Anti-Fragile Careers: A Life of Jobs vs. A Job for Life

Anti-Fragile Careers:  A Life of Jobs vs. A Job for Life | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it

Deb's pending presentations for 2014:  

Your One Big Life:  How to Be Anti-Fragile through Downturns, Upturns and Turnarounds     

and

      

HR Social Media Strategy Amplified:  Careers, Culture and Performance      Scheduling into 2014!   
Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 26, 2013 4:08 PM

Corporation and big companies can provide a lot by way of benefits, pensions, salaries.  However, since the 70's, with the exception of a few stable 100-year companies, a job is RARELY a job for life.


The topics listed above are pending for 2014 conferences.  


You can join a mailing list for monthly news on Best of the BEST learning including career tools via REVELN Tools

What's your anti-fragile career plan?   ~  Deb

Rescooped by Robin Martin from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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A Pulp Innovation & Change Chapter: The Innovation Plan includes the Return of Status Quo

A Pulp Innovation & Change Chapter: The Innovation Plan includes the Return of Status Quo | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it

"Pushing an innovation plan forward?  Here comes the first major obstacle instead of a much-needed catalyst, for the rapid plummet to the bottom, roller coaster style in this 'pulp innovation' chapter change story."

 

This innovation series includes a set of chapter pulp fiction stories, complete with cliff hangers, setting up a series of cautionary tales of how to create innovation as a sustainable, repeatable business process.  

 

This episode of Jeffrey Phillips's series involves the destablization of those leading change to an innovation culture.  Enter the other staff manager with enough “bandwidth” to actively participate, which means those not senior enough to speed the work.

 

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The annual planning cycle, that recurring monster better known ...as the idea killing process...with no ambiguity and no room for error.

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Excerpts:

 

After the usual pleasantries, Susan and I set out an ambitious plan to build an innovation team, encourage incremental and disruptive innovation throughout the organization and start building innovation communities...

 

...it seemed that everyone else had a different perspective or intent for our project.

 

“Great. Do you think we can have new products in the pipeline so we can get budgets in place during the annual planning cycle?”

 

The annual planning cycle, that recurring monster better known to innovation experts as the idea killing process. There’s no business process or decision making apparatus less welcoming to innovation than the annual planning process, a place where great ideas go to die.

 

...A rigid, microscopically managed process with no ambiguity and no room for error. ...While the revenue numbers may be a bit inflated and fanciful, the projects that get approved go under a ROI microscope, which inevitably means that many innovative ideas are rejected.

 

By the end of our first meeting I’d reached the bottom of the roller coaster. ...Even though we had open channels to Brockwell, I didn’t think it would matter. ...

 

Perhaps we should recruit Mr. Kasamis.”  “Doug Kasamis, the chairman?” ...if he is willing, he could rally most of the organization to a significant change.”

 

Read the full post here.


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Rescooped by Robin Martin from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Why Innovation Dies - A University Example of Structure Gone Bad - Forbes

Why Innovation Dies - A University Example of Structure Gone Bad - Forbes | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it

The classic mistakes made in dealing with disruption are here:  a new administrative lead role (a dean),  policy teams, committees, and implementation plan.

 

"...the minute the memo started talking about a Policy Team developing detailed implementation plans, it was all over."

 

Have you been there?  How did it turn out for you?


...Any possibility for innovation dies when a company forms a committee for an “overarching strategy.”

 

This insightful article by Steve Blank, mirrors what's I've read about and seen time and time again in decisive actions taken by executives and in large institutions.

 

Excerpted:

 

Lessons Learned

Innovation in New Markets do not come from “overarching strategies” It comes out of opportunity, chaos and rapid experimentation Solutions are found by betting on a portfolio of low-cost experiments The road for innovation does not go through committee

One useful purpose a university committee could have had was figuring out what the goal of going online was.  [The example in the article is education based.]

 

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...it is so complex that figuring out the one possible path to a correct solution is computationally incalculable.
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...the path to implementing online education is not known. In fact, it’s not a solvable problem by committee, regardless of how many smart people in the room. It is a “NP complete” problem – it is so complex that figuring out the one possible path to a correct solution is computationally incalculable.

 

By:  Steve Blank, author, teacher of entrepreneurship and consultant who has reshaped how startups are created. He is coauthor of the recently published, The Startup Owner’s Manual (K&S Ranch, 2012).


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