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"IN-novation"
Just "IN" or has it been around and we've just given it a name?
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Rescooped by Robin Martin from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Open Innovation & Organizational Boundaries, in Institutions, Will it Blend? — HBS Working Knowledge

Open Innovation & Organizational Boundaries, in Institutions, Will it Blend? — HBS Working Knowledge | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it
Open innovation, enabled by low-cost communication and the decreased costs of memory and computation, has transformed markets and social relations.

 

As the authors illustrate, it will be challenging to manage contrasting modes of innovation, and that is exactly what is needed in organizations that expect to innovate and are systemically, culturally, not set up to help this happen. 

 

 

Excerpts:

Open innovation, in contrast to firm-centered innovation, is radically decentralized, peer based, and includes intrinsic and pro-social motives.

 

The authors of this working paper use in-depth examples from Apple, NASA, and Lego to argue that open innovation will at least complement, if not increasingly substitute for, more traditional innovation modes.

 

This is within the contexts of increasing modularity and decreased communication costs.   (DN:  Just look at digital communication today.  Think ahead 4 months to 1 year of what's next.)

 

Emerging theories must be informed by these contrasting innovation modes and the implications for governance, incentives, intellectual property, managerial choice, professional and organizational identity, and organizational cultures.

 

Key concepts include:

 

Leaders and senior teams can take advantage of contrasting innovation modes, paradoxical organizational requirements, and associated dynamic boundaries.

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Leaders need to execute strategic choices with the systems, structures, incentives, cultures, and boundaries tailored to open and firm-based innovation modes. . Multiple types of boundaries will increasingly be employed to manage innovation, from traditional to complex intra firm boundaries (such as ambidextrous designs), to webs of interdependence with partners and potentially anonymous communities. . Senior teams must build their capabilities to deal with contradictions as well as their organization's ability to embrance contradictions.  

 

A link to the full working paper, downloadable by Assistant Professor, Karim R. Lakhani & colleague is here.

 

Source:  Karim R. Lakhani is an assistant professor in the Technology and Operations Management unit at Harvard Business School.  

 

This link was also recommended by Jeffrey DeGraff at the University of Michigan Ross School of Business, and I also think it's right on, even if the language is quite academic.  It will make you think about your institutional systems, and refresh your vocabulary.    ~  Deb


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Rescooped by Robin Martin from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Big Companies Need Small Companies in their Open Innovation Ecosystems

Big Companies Need Small Companies in their Open Innovation Ecosystems | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it

Matching to Innovate:  Small companies often are at the leading edge of breakthrough or disruptive innovation, and need the resources the larger company can provide.

 

This rings so true.  The magic is in the matching the small with the big, so both will benefit.

 

Excerpted:  Breakthrough innovation – that is, innovation with potential to be a real game changer – can be exceedingly hard to achieve in a large, bureaucratic organization where people work in silos, have their own turf to protect and are wedded to the status quo.


Small companies can take risks that large companies can’t afford to take because the bigger entities have to protect and defend their established core business operations.  (DN:  I have als0 been reading and curating examples of larger companies cannibalizing their core operations to fund new ventures & innovations, so the examples are out there, especially in the fringes of big company ventures.)

 

The price of failure for the small, agile start-up is significantly less than that of a large corporation. At this level people tend to embrace risk, while the larger companies may have cultures that don’t support risk taking at all.


Smaller companies are often closer to the markets they serve than large corporations are to their markets. As a result, small companies can be effective in helping large companies obtain a better grasp of changing needs within a market and better insights into innovations that might meet those needs. Smaller companies may also have developed ties with sub-markets that corporations have not been able to reach. This again offers more opportunities for innovation.


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Making open innovation work for companies and contributors, TopCoder and InnoCentive

Making open innovation work for companies and contributors, TopCoder and InnoCentive | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it

"...even though we champion the garage inventor--most of [the innovations that we were chronicling] happened in seclusion or in the confines of an organization."

 

It's exciting to see alternatives to the traditional innovation model of an R&D group that gets together in a lab...

 

Excerpted:

...the [innovation] model is changing. More ideas, more products, and more projects are being developed openly, and different ways of collaborating are emerging. TopCoder and InnoCentive are two companies, both now ten years old, that are making that happen.

 

TopCoder believes that connecting people who have ideas with people who can implement them is a better approach to innovation.

 

Anyone can be a member, so anyone can contribute--all you have to do is register. The community now has nearly 400,000 members. They host competitions for programming as well as design and creative, development, and assembly competitions.

 

InnoCentive was founded to remedy the institutional innovation problem. It began with seed funding from Eli Lilly, which recognized the rising cost of innovation, particularly in pharmaceuticals, and took the initiative to look for a better way to innovate.

 

They now work in industries from chemicals to aeronautics. Likewise, InnoCentive awards are given in a broader range than TopCoder, with challenges that range from chemistry and statistics to business and agriculture.

 

Each of these approaches to open innovation gives companies unprecedented power by connecting them to innovators around the world in near-real-time.

 

Source:  Opensource.com


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