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"IN-novation"
Just "IN" or has it been around and we've just given it a name?
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Three Critical Innovation Roles: Broker, Role Model, Risk-Taker

Three Critical Innovation Roles:  Broker, Role Model, Risk-Taker | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it

Innovation comes from informal key leadership roles. Brokers, Role Models and Risk-takers are the engine of innovation cultures.


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Robin Martin's comment, August 6, 2013 1:39 PM
Thanks for sharing!
Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, August 10, 2013 9:14 AM

"You won’t find these functions described in job descriptions, nor will you find someone with a title like “risk-taker.”  You won’t find these roles being incentivized, or formally evaluated or even recognized, as a rule.   Like many aspects of an innovation culture, they happen – serendipitously – or they don’t.  And because the roles are elusive and difficult to measure, they can go unappreciated and unnoticed.  And then they gradually fade away.

 

But if you look hard in your organization, trust your own judgment, and use your best observational skills, you can find, nurture, and acknowledge these key individuals and keep their critical skill sets alive . . . and growing."

Pascal Hoguet's curator insight, August 12, 2013 3:13 PM

Des rôles clés, facteurs de succès pour favoriser l'innovation dans une organisation.

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How Google Became Such a Great Place To Work

How Google Became Such a Great Place To Work | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it

Google calls its HR department People Operations, though most people in the firm shorten it to POPS.The group is headed by Laszlo Bock, a trim, soft-spoken 40-year-old who came to Google six years ago.

 

Bock says that when POPS looked into Google’s woman problem, it found it was really a new mother problem: Women who had recently given birth were leaving at twice Google’s average departure rate.

 

At the time, Google offered an industry-standard maternity leave plan. After a woman gave birth, she got 12 weeks of paid time off. For all other new parents in its California offices, but not for its workers outside the state, the company offered seven paid weeks of leave.


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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, January 26, 2013 12:45 PM

Great example of not resting on its laurels... Google keeps reaping the dividens of its investment in their workforce. 

Andrew Spence's curator insight, January 27, 2013 1:02 PM

Want an example of great HR - just Google it!

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Open Innovation & Organizational Boundaries, in Institutions, Will it Blend? — HBS Working Knowledge

Open Innovation & Organizational Boundaries, in Institutions, Will it Blend? — HBS Working Knowledge | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it
Open innovation, enabled by low-cost communication and the decreased costs of memory and computation, has transformed markets and social relations.

 

As the authors illustrate, it will be challenging to manage contrasting modes of innovation, and that is exactly what is needed in organizations that expect to innovate and are systemically, culturally, not set up to help this happen. 

 

 

Excerpts:

Open innovation, in contrast to firm-centered innovation, is radically decentralized, peer based, and includes intrinsic and pro-social motives.

 

The authors of this working paper use in-depth examples from Apple, NASA, and Lego to argue that open innovation will at least complement, if not increasingly substitute for, more traditional innovation modes.

 

This is within the contexts of increasing modularity and decreased communication costs.   (DN:  Just look at digital communication today.  Think ahead 4 months to 1 year of what's next.)

 

Emerging theories must be informed by these contrasting innovation modes and the implications for governance, incentives, intellectual property, managerial choice, professional and organizational identity, and organizational cultures.

 

Key concepts include:

 

Leaders and senior teams can take advantage of contrasting innovation modes, paradoxical organizational requirements, and associated dynamic boundaries.

.

Leaders need to execute strategic choices with the systems, structures, incentives, cultures, and boundaries tailored to open and firm-based innovation modes. . Multiple types of boundaries will increasingly be employed to manage innovation, from traditional to complex intra firm boundaries (such as ambidextrous designs), to webs of interdependence with partners and potentially anonymous communities. . Senior teams must build their capabilities to deal with contradictions as well as their organization's ability to embrance contradictions.  

 

A link to the full working paper, downloadable by Assistant Professor, Karim R. Lakhani & colleague is here.

 

Source:  Karim R. Lakhani is an assistant professor in the Technology and Operations Management unit at Harvard Business School.  

 

This link was also recommended by Jeffrey DeGraff at the University of Michigan Ross School of Business, and I also think it's right on, even if the language is quite academic.  It will make you think about your institutional systems, and refresh your vocabulary.    ~  Deb


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Leading in a VUCA world

Leading in a VUCA world | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it

"How’s your leadership working on in your VUCA world (Volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous)? "

 

Liz Guthridge has written a great post on leading in a VUCA world; VCUA stands for volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous, a term coined by the US Army War College in the weeks before September 11, 2001.  

 

Liz & I discussed the need for collaboration and community across disciplines to succeed in a VUCA world in connection with our recent panel + Open Space presentation we did for a global change conference.

 

__________________________

 

VUCA can provide threats [and] offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.” ~ Dr. Bob Johansen

__________________________

 

Here are some excerpts of her take on the insightful presentation by one of our keynote presenters:

 

"Leading in a VUCA world" is a popular phrase with Bob Johansen, a distinguished fellow and former president of Institute for the Future.

 

According to Dr. Johansen, who shared his 2020 forecast at the Association of Change Management Professionals global conference this week, our VUCA world is not going away. In fact it’s just going to spin faster during the next decade.

 

In his talk “External Future Forces That Will Disrupt the Practice of Change Management,” Dr. Johansen noted that VUCA is not necessarily doom and gloom. While VUCA can provide threats, it also can offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.”

 

As for his two big 2022 predictions for organizational change agents, they are:

 

1. “The digital natives (now 16 years or younger) will create new practices to make change through gaming.” (The other key phrase besides gaming in this sentence is “make.” Dr. Johansen predicts that a culture of makers will drive the next generation of change. And as a result, leaders need to show the “maker instinct” trait.)

 

2. “Reciprocity-based innovation will focus on the economic, social and psychological value of reciprocity.” (Two important traits for leaders are smart-mob organizing and commons creating. Think Creative Commons.)

 

Dr. Johansen challenged the 825 of us in attendance to figure out how to help people and organizations adapt to these changes and others.

 

To do this, we should watch our terms and our questions.  Read Liz's full post here.


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Tom Hood's curator insight, April 6, 2013 5:16 PM

We just covered this in our townhall this past Monday. Arelene Thomas (AICPA/CGMA) talked about VUCA related to CPAs in Biz/Industry.


VUCA can provide threats [and] offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.” ~ Dr. Bob Johansen

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 6, 2013 5:26 PM

We need to consider VUCA

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What is the Relationship Between Culture and Strategy

What is the Relationship Between Culture and Strategy | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it

Corporate culture is an incredibly powerful factor in a company’s long-term success. No matter how good your strategy is, when it comes down to it, people always make the difference. Strategy is rational and culture is emotional. 


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Ajish Kumar's curator insight, June 27, 2013 10:27 AM

Good one on strategy. I really like the simple definition of strategy.

Russ Bergeman's curator insight, June 28, 2013 9:36 AM

Strategy is what drives the organization as a whole... Organizations are complex interrelationships of human beings... Culture is the human element of the organization.

Russ Bergeman's curator insight, June 28, 2013 9:38 AM

Strategy is what drives the organization as a whole... Organizations are complex interrelationships of human beings... Culture is the human element of the organization. Thoughts...?

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Moving at the Speed of Creativity - Leading a Culture of Innovation by Sir Ken Robinson

Moving at the Speed of Creativity - Leading a Culture of Innovation by Sir Ken Robinson | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it

Ken Robinson’s TED talk has now been viewed over 216 million times

 

Read more:

http://www.speedofcreativity.org/2012/11/13/leading-a-culture-of-innovation-by-sir-ken-robinson-sirkenrobinson-socf12/

 

 


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The 12 Masters of Innovation - Perspectives, Slideshare, Harvard Business Review

The 12 Masters of Innovation - Perspectives, Slideshare, Harvard Business Review | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it

Worth a good look on leadership in innovation.

 

Some of who are listed include these educators:

 

Steve Blank, a seasoned entrepreneur who lectures at Berkeley and Stanford

His most important innovation lesson:

A startup is a "temporary organization searching for a repeatable and scalable business model"—a structured search process maximizes your chances of success. If you read one book, read: The Four Steps to the Epiphany (Cafepress.com, 2005)

 

Clayton Christensen, Harvard Business School professor and Innosight co-founder.
His most important innovation lesson:

Doing everything right can leave a successful organization susceptible to attack from a disruptive innovator who changes the game with a simple, accessible, or affordable solution. If you read one book, read: The Innovator's Solution (with Michael Raynor; Harvard Business Review Press, 2003)

 

Peter Drucker, legendary management guru and long-time professor at the Claremont Graduate University His most important innovation lesson: "The customer rarely buys what the company thinks it is selling him." Companies need to take a customer-first perspective to succeed with innovation. If you read one book, read: Innovation and Entrepreneurship (originally published in 1985)

 

 


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A Pulp Innovation & Change Chapter: The Innovation Plan includes the Return of Status Quo

A Pulp Innovation & Change Chapter: The Innovation Plan includes the Return of Status Quo | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it

"Pushing an innovation plan forward?  Here comes the first major obstacle instead of a much-needed catalyst, for the rapid plummet to the bottom, roller coaster style in this 'pulp innovation' chapter change story."

 

This innovation series includes a set of chapter pulp fiction stories, complete with cliff hangers, setting up a series of cautionary tales of how to create innovation as a sustainable, repeatable business process.  

 

This episode of Jeffrey Phillips's series involves the destablization of those leading change to an innovation culture.  Enter the other staff manager with enough “bandwidth” to actively participate, which means those not senior enough to speed the work.

 

_______________________________

 

The annual planning cycle, that recurring monster better known ...as the idea killing process...with no ambiguity and no room for error.

_______________________________

 

Excerpts:

 

After the usual pleasantries, Susan and I set out an ambitious plan to build an innovation team, encourage incremental and disruptive innovation throughout the organization and start building innovation communities...

 

...it seemed that everyone else had a different perspective or intent for our project.

 

“Great. Do you think we can have new products in the pipeline so we can get budgets in place during the annual planning cycle?”

 

The annual planning cycle, that recurring monster better known to innovation experts as the idea killing process. There’s no business process or decision making apparatus less welcoming to innovation than the annual planning process, a place where great ideas go to die.

 

...A rigid, microscopically managed process with no ambiguity and no room for error. ...While the revenue numbers may be a bit inflated and fanciful, the projects that get approved go under a ROI microscope, which inevitably means that many innovative ideas are rejected.

 

By the end of our first meeting I’d reached the bottom of the roller coaster. ...Even though we had open channels to Brockwell, I didn’t think it would matter. ...

 

Perhaps we should recruit Mr. Kasamis.”  “Doug Kasamis, the chairman?” ...if he is willing, he could rally most of the organization to a significant change.”

 

Read the full post here.


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