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"IN-novation"
Just "IN" or has it been around and we've just given it a name?
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The Shifts We Will Barely Feel - Adaptation via Chris Brogan

The Shifts We Will Barely Feel - Adaptation via Chris Brogan | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it

PEOPLE WON’T EVER DO THAT:  The enemy of understanding change and shifts is the mindset that says “no one will give up owning their music.”

More examples from top blogger Chris Brogan:

It’s the mindset that says, “Stay at someone’s house? Too creepy. Hotels only.”

 

The moment you shift your thoughts into “people won’t” territory, you’ll miss what can happen, what might happen, and what will happen.

People won’t want dinners that take 3 minutes to heat up. 

 

  

 

People won’t want food handed to them through windows. 

 

  

 

People won’t want to read blogs from unknowns when they can follow the mainstream. 

 

  

 

People won’t type 140 character messages.

 

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 24, 2013 10:46 AM

Did  you ever hear about "salad in a bag?"  Now, in the US, it is ubiquitous, along with veggies in a bag, milk in boxes, refried beans in a bag.  ~  D

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Tina Brown and Björk, Sisters of Innovation - Get ready for the True Digital Natives.

Tina Brown and Björk, Sisters of Innovation - Get ready for the True Digital Natives. | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it

"Björk and Tina Brown have many differences but one common problem: They are watching the boat beneath them sink. Innovation is a strong option out of a death spiral."

 

The helpful piece by Mr. McCracken mirrors the blend of the real and virtual as Bob Johansen, futurist, covered so well in the middle keynote of the ACMP 2012 conference I attended in Las Vegas this past week.  (The Association of Change Management Professionals.)

 

Seeing babies interact with the iPad, then attempt to interact with magazines in the same way (it's broken), was one of the most compelling of Johansen's keynote elements and points about the real digital natives (less than 16 years of age.)  

 

I want to try the same experiment with babies near me, and expect the same result.

 

Bob Johansen's book is a compelling read, on the iPad it will be, for me.  Bob spoke on the topic:  Leaders Make the Future: Ten New Leadership Skills for an Uncertain Age

 

Excerpted from Grant McCracken's post today:

 

Björk and Tina Brown have many differences but one common problem: They are watching the boat beneath them sink. Their print and music industries are being disintermediated by the digital revolution. They are struggling to respond to the blue-ocean and white-space and black-swan disruption that besets us all.

 

Brown and Björk had enough altitude to glide to career's end.  [Their] experiments may not save them (or us). But they've given us cultural innovations of some interest. And daring.

 

Björk's Biophilia isn't just an album. It's an app. We open it to discover a jewel-like universe, a 3D model of galaxies in space. As we spin these, we discover hot spots. And when we investigate them, music begins to play. The music of the spheres has come unto the iPad.

 

Björk and Brown are forcing their way out of old models into promising new ground. 

 

Harvard Business Review blog author: Grant McCracken is a research affiliate at MIT and the author of Chief Culture Officer. His most recent book, Culturematic, is forthcoming this May from Harvard Business Review Press.

 

Photo credit: Bjork, by Vivi Gondek via Flickr


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Here Come The Intrapreneurs - Forbes

Here Come The Intrapreneurs - Forbes | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it

"There is a third way, and it's called being an intrapreneur."

 

Yes, you can innovate from the inside, but as in many organizations, it depends on culture, climate, placement, experience, network, and many other factors.

 

___________________________

 

a large organization that becomes complacent and loses sight of the benefits of having an entrepreneurial streak built into their massive global systems can find themselves disrupted in short order. ~ David Armano

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Here's a recent Forbes interview take on an older idea, intrapreneuring, that has been around awhile.  It's always worth a look, if it might tip the scales in favor of your organization being more intrapreneurial.

 

Excerpted:

 

From the full post by David Armano, executive VP, Global Innovation & Integration at Edelman.

 

while entrepreneurialism seems to be enjoying a golden age of sorts, it isn’t for everyone.

 

An intrapreneur is someone who has an entrepreneurial streak in his or her DNA, but chooses to align his or her talents with a large organization in place of creating his or her own.

 

...several years ago when I struck up a conversation with an older gentleman at a train station and I described what I did for a living, he said something I’ll never forget: “Oh, you’re an intrapreneur–so was I.”

 

...Some of my peers who are doing work in the social business industry also are intrapreneurs whether they suspect it or not:  

Scott Monty of Ford,  Ekaterina Walter of Intel,  Richard Binhammer of Dell,  Pete Blackshaw of Nestlé,  Bonin Bough of Kraft and  Frank Eliason of Citi, to name a few.

 

The start-up community has successfully demonstrated that the modern world needs entrepreneurs.

 

But this only makes intrapreneurs more critical, because in a world filled with fast-moving change, a large organization that becomes complacent and loses sight of the benefits of having an entrepreneurial streak built into their massive global systems can find themselves disrupted in short order.

 

This is where intrapreneurs come in handy. Smart organizations will seek out individuals who like to invent, innovate and want to be on the front lines of change. 

 


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Classic to New: Learning Agility is Change Mastery

Classic to New:  Learning Agility is Change Mastery | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it
“Learning Agility, which has four dimensions—Mental Agility, People Agility, Results Agility and Change Agility—is a key to unlocking our change proficiency.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, December 27, 2012 4:30 PM

In reading through the change research of a colleague, this approach resonates, especially cultivating the ability to be a combination of a data nerd (listener), synthesizer, developer of self & others and master communicator.  These relate well to change proficiencies touted by this author.  ~  D

Paul Thoresen's curator insight, December 30, 2012 3:59 PM
"Classic to New: Learning Agility is Change Mastery"
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, January 25, 2013 5:43 PM
@Paul, thanks for the share.
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Leading in a VUCA world

Leading in a VUCA world | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it

"How’s your leadership working on in your VUCA world (Volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous)? "

 

Liz Guthridge has written a great post on leading in a VUCA world; VCUA stands for volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous, a term coined by the US Army War College in the weeks before September 11, 2001.  

 

Liz & I discussed the need for collaboration and community across disciplines to succeed in a VUCA world in connection with our recent panel + Open Space presentation we did for a global change conference.

 

__________________________

 

VUCA can provide threats [and] offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.” ~ Dr. Bob Johansen

__________________________

 

Here are some excerpts of her take on the insightful presentation by one of our keynote presenters:

 

"Leading in a VUCA world" is a popular phrase with Bob Johansen, a distinguished fellow and former president of Institute for the Future.

 

According to Dr. Johansen, who shared his 2020 forecast at the Association of Change Management Professionals global conference this week, our VUCA world is not going away. In fact it’s just going to spin faster during the next decade.

 

In his talk “External Future Forces That Will Disrupt the Practice of Change Management,” Dr. Johansen noted that VUCA is not necessarily doom and gloom. While VUCA can provide threats, it also can offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.”

 

As for his two big 2022 predictions for organizational change agents, they are:

 

1. “The digital natives (now 16 years or younger) will create new practices to make change through gaming.” (The other key phrase besides gaming in this sentence is “make.” Dr. Johansen predicts that a culture of makers will drive the next generation of change. And as a result, leaders need to show the “maker instinct” trait.)

 

2. “Reciprocity-based innovation will focus on the economic, social and psychological value of reciprocity.” (Two important traits for leaders are smart-mob organizing and commons creating. Think Creative Commons.)

 

Dr. Johansen challenged the 825 of us in attendance to figure out how to help people and organizations adapt to these changes and others.

 

To do this, we should watch our terms and our questions.  Read Liz's full post here.


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Tom Hood's curator insight, April 6, 2013 5:16 PM

We just covered this in our townhall this past Monday. Arelene Thomas (AICPA/CGMA) talked about VUCA related to CPAs in Biz/Industry.


VUCA can provide threats [and] offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.” ~ Dr. Bob Johansen

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 6, 2013 5:26 PM

We need to consider VUCA