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"IN-novation"
Just "IN" or has it been around and we've just given it a name?
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Rescooped by Robin Martin from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Finding Innovation Help Next Door, Even in your Past, Forgotten Experience | Innovation Excellence |

Finding Innovation Help Next Door, Even in your Past, Forgotten Experience | Innovation Excellence | | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it

Great examples of ways to cultivate innovation - other companies in other industries, other verticals:  “Who else has solved a similar problem?”

 

A medical device company that made angioplasty equipment wanted to create a computer simulation that would predict how the “balloon” would expand.

 

Where did they turn for an accurate computer model?

 

In the past, they worked with car manufacturers and built statistical models that simulated the expansion and contraction of airbags. This proved to be a wildly accurate way of predicting how a balloon catheter would operate.

 

When you are working on your next business challenge, ask yourself:

“Who else has solved a similar problem?”

 

In doing so, you might significantly accelerate your innovation effort.

 

Blog author Stephen Shapiro is the author of five books including “Best Practices Are Stupid” and “Personality Poker” (both published by Penguin). 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Rescooped by Robin Martin from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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How Schools Can Teach Innovation | Wall St. Journal

How Schools Can Teach Innovation | Wall St. Journal | "IN-novation" | Scoop.it

Changing education & best practice:  Results from systemic interviews focused on young Americans is that they learn how to innovate most often despite their schooling—not because of it.  

Excerpted, by Tony Wagner

In most high-school and college classes, failure is penalized. But without trial and error, there is no innovation.

Amanda Alonzo, a 32-year-old teacher at Lynbrook High School in San Jose, Calif., who has mentored two Intel Science Prize finalists and 10 semifinalists in the last two years—more than any other public school science teacher in the U.S.—told me, "One of the most important things I have to teach my students is that when you fail, you are learning." Students gain lasting self-confidence not by being protected from failure but by learning that they can survive it. 


Via Jim Lerman, Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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