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In fair Verona
'Romeo & Juliet'...reading the play today
Curated by Cindy Sullivan
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Cross-Dress'd Shakespeare Presents Reading Of 'Romeo And Juliet' - Broadway World

Cross-Dress'd Shakespeare Presents Reading Of 'Romeo And Juliet' - Broadway World | In fair Verona | Scoop.it
Orlando Shakespeare Theater's age-reversed reading allows audiences to see this classic story from a new angle - the lovers will be 45 years old and up, and the parents will be 40 and below. What might we learn about the relationships between parents and children, how age changes our outlook on life, and the nature of love?

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Shakespeare or Marlowe?

Samuel Blumenfeld, author of The Marlowe-Shakespeare Connection: A New Study of the Authorship Question, interviewed in Cambridge, MA, on May 14, 2009. In this segment, Blumenfeld briefly discusses why Christopher Marlowe is the most likely candidate to have authored the Shakespeare works, and why William Shakespeare himself is a weak candidate...
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Your Choice

Your Choice | In fair Verona | Scoop.it
Which visual image of Romeo and Juliet is your favourite? Explain the reasons for your choice.
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Romeo and Juliet - The Killers

The Killers cover the Dire Straits track Romeo and Juliet. Check out the lyrics at http://www.stlyrics.com/lyrics/empirerecords/romeoandjuliet.htm
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Madeline Northey's comment, April 23, 2011 1:12 PM
I never heard this before. Really cool that The Killers have this song! I think it would be cool to incorporate into an ELA classroom.
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Shakespeare, the paywall and the benfits of copyright.

Shakespeare, the paywall and the benfits of copyright. | In fair Verona | Scoop.it
How did Shakespeare become so great? Economically speaking, it all had to do with market economies.Those who paid could enter and see the play; those who didn’t, couldn’t.

By the time Shakespeare turned to writing, these “cultural paywalls” were abundant in London: workers holding moneyboxes (bearing the distinctive knobs found by the archaeologists) stood at the entrances of a growing number of outdoor playhouses, collecting a penny for admission.

At day’s end, actors and theater owners smashed open the earthenware moneyboxes and divided the daily take. From those proceeds dramatists were paid to write new plays. For the first time ever, it was possible to earn a living writing for the public.
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