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In Deep Water
A Pretty Kettle of Fish
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Bad news for whale sharks: The world’s largest fish are being killed for bait and billboards « Southern Fried Science

Bad news for whale sharks: The world’s largest fish are being killed for bait and billboards « Southern Fried Science | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

The world’s largest shark eats only plankton, couldn’t bite a human if it wanted to, and is one of the few sharks that could be reasonably described as beautiful. ...

 

Their long migrations through international waters makes international cooperation necessary to protect them, which is particularly important because the 30 years it can take for these animals to reach reproductive maturity means that populations will take a long time to recover if they are overexploited. They’re listed by the IUCN Shark Specialist Group as Vulnerable globally.

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The 5cience: The Secret Life of Plankton

The 5cience: The Secret Life of Plankton | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

"New videography techniques have opened up the oceans' microscopic ecosystem, revealing it to be both mesmerizingly beautiful and astoundingly complex. Marine biologist Tierney Thys has used footage from a pioneering project to create a film designed to ignite wonder and curiosity about this hidden world that underpins our own food chain."

Will interest children and adults alike. 

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SAHFOS - Dramatic changes in the biology of the North Atlantic and North Sea

SAHFOS - Dramatic changes in the biology of the North Atlantic and North Sea | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

"... more unexpected was the discovery that the plankton shift is also strongly driven by an increase in the windiness in the North Atlantic region over the last 50 years. This increase in windiness is something that is often overlooked. In the ocean, windiness promotes vertical mixing of the water, which in turn has profound impacts on surface nutrients levels and the vertical distribution of plankton. In general, windier conditions seem to favour diatoms over dinoflagellates.

The new patterns show major shifts in the distribution of economically important species known to cause harmful effects through toxin poisoning. The wider implication of this discovery are not fully known, but the switch from dinoflagellates to diatoms is likely to have propagated up the food chain to impact much larger animals such as fish and whales."

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