In Deep Water
Follow
Find
1.9K views | +0 today
In Deep Water
A Pretty Kettle of Fish
Curated by David Rowing
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

BP's Corexit Oil Tar Sponged Up by Human Skin

BP's Corexit Oil Tar Sponged Up by Human Skin | In Deep Water | Scoop.it
A new study by the Surfrider Foundation finds BP's Corexit-tainted oil remains entrenched on the beaches and in the shallows of the Gulf, and that human skin likes nothing better than to suck it up and not let go.

 

"... the toxins in this unholy mix of Corexit and crude actually penetrate wet skin faster than dry skin  - the author describes it as the equivalent of a built-in accelerant - though you'd never know it unless you happened to look under fluorescent light in the 370nm spectrum. The stuff can't be wiped off. It's absorbed into the skin.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Rowing from Ocean News
Scoop.it!

World's smallest dolphin: only 55 left, but continue to drown in nets

World's smallest dolphin: only 55 left, but continue to drown in nets | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

The world's smallest dolphin is also the closest to extinction. New Zealand government figures show that Maui's dolphin (Cephalorhynchus hectori maui) are down to just 55 mature individuals, falling from 111 in 2005. The small cetaceans, measuring up to 1.7 meters (5.5 feet), are imperiled due to drowning in gillnets with the most recent death by a fisherman's net occurring in January.

 


Via Domino
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Jellyfish on the rise: study

Jellyfish on the rise: study | In Deep Water | Scoop.it
Jellyfish are increasing in the majority of the world's coastal ecosystems, according to the first global study of jellyfish abundance by University of British Columbia researchers.

 

Jellyfish directly interfere with many human activities – by stinging swimmers, clogging intakes of power plants, and interfering with fishing. Some species of jellyfish are now a food source in some parts of the world.


"By combining published scientific data with other unpublished data and observations, we could make this study truly global – and offer the best available scientific estimate of a phenomenon that has been widely discussed," says Daniel Pauly, principal investigator of the Sea Around Us Project and co-author of the study. "We can also see that the places where we see rising numbers of jellyfish are often areas heavily impacted by humans, through pollution, overfishing, and warming waters."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Bad news for whale sharks: The world’s largest fish are being killed for bait and billboards « Southern Fried Science

Bad news for whale sharks: The world’s largest fish are being killed for bait and billboards « Southern Fried Science | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

The world’s largest shark eats only plankton, couldn’t bite a human if it wanted to, and is one of the few sharks that could be reasonably described as beautiful. ...

 

Their long migrations through international waters makes international cooperation necessary to protect them, which is particularly important because the 30 years it can take for these animals to reach reproductive maturity means that populations will take a long time to recover if they are overexploited. They’re listed by the IUCN Shark Specialist Group as Vulnerable globally.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

As Arctic warms, world powers jostling for foothold | CTV News

As Arctic warms, world powers jostling for foothold | CTV News | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

To the world's military leaders, the debate over climate change is long over. They are preparing for a new kind of Cold War in the Arctic, anticipating that rising temperatures there will open up a treasure trove of resources, long-dreamed-of sea lanes and a slew of potential conflicts.

 

By Arctic standards, the region is already buzzing with military activity, and experts believe that will increase significantly in the years ahead. ...

 

None of this means a shooting war is likely at the North Pole any time soon. But as the number of workers and ships increases in the High North to exploit oil and gas reserves, so will the need for policing, border patrols and -- if push comes to shove -- military muscle to enforce rival claims.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Current management practices in the Baltic Sea and the Kattegat endanger long term sustainability of fisheries

Current management practices in the Baltic Sea and the Kattegat endanger long term sustainability of fisheries | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

Oceana today released a report on the disappointing state of the fisheries management in the Baltic Sea. The report exposes a number of unsustainable fishing practices, both legal and illegal, that persist despite the ongoing efforts to achieve a thriving and sustainable fishing industry in the region. The international marine conservation organization says that many of the current measures are inadequate to ensure the long term viability of the sector and the marine environment. In fact, 80% of commercially caught stocks in the Baltic Sea and the Kattegat lack basic management plans.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Rowing from Ocean Conservation
Scoop.it!

Polar Bears Show Signs of Mysterious Illness | alaskapublic.org

Polar Bears Show Signs of Mysterious Illness | alaskapublic.org | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

Biologists have found Polar Bears in the Beaufort Sea with hair loss and skin lesions. Those are the same symptoms that have sickened ice seals and walruses in the arctic since last summer and led the federal government to declare the incident an unusual mortality event. Scientists are just beginning an investigation into whether polar bears are suffering from the same thing. ...
 

The biologists collected blood and tissues from the affected bears to try to figure out if the symptoms are related to the mysterious illness that has been found in ice seals and walruses. Dozens of seals have died from the disease, but no walrus deaths are attributed to it. Scientists don’t know yet if the walrus and seals are suffering from the same thing. Although the veterinary pathologist who has done most of the necropsies on the animals say the lesions look very similar under the microscope. Julie Speegle is a spokesperson for the National Marine Fisheries Service. She says its been a difficult case: “We still don’t know what is causing the disease. But our scientists have ruled out a number of bacteria and viruses that are known to affect marine mammals.”


Via Kirsten Massebeau
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

British scientific expedition discovers world’s deepest known undersea volcanic vents - National Oceanography Centre, Southampton

British scientific expedition discovers world’s deepest known undersea volcanic vents - National Oceanography Centre, Southampton | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

"A British scientific expedition has discovered the world's deepest undersea volcanic vents, known as 'black smokers', 3.1 miles (5000 metres) down in the Cayman Trough in the Caribbean. Using a deep-diving vehicle remotely controlled from the Royal Research Ship James Cook, the scientists found slender spires made of copper and iron ores on the seafloor, erupting water hot enough to melt lead, nearly half a mile deeper than anyone has seen before.

 

Deep-sea vents are undersea springs where superheated water erupts from the ocean floor. They were first seen in the Pacific three decades ago, but most are found between one and two miles deep. Scientists are fascinated by deep-sea vents because the scalding water that gushes from them nourishes lush colonies of deep-sea creatures, which has forced scientists to rewrite the rules of biology."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

50-plus Corals in U.S. Waters Face Extinction by Century's End

50-plus Corals in U.S. Waters Face Extinction by Century's End | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

"Coral reefs are home to 25 percent of marine life and play a vital function in ocean ecosystems. Already one-third of the world’s coral reefs have been destroyed, and scientists warn that by mid-century most corals will be in inhospitable waters that are too warm or acidic. Since the 1990s, coral growth has grown sluggish in some areas due to ocean acidification, and mass bleaching events are increasingly frequent."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

News - Sockeye Salmon Populations at Risk

News - Sockeye Salmon Populations at Risk | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

Salmon populations are exposed to many human threats, including overfishing, mixed-stock fisheries, habitat loss, habitat degradation, negative genetic and ecological interactions with hatchery fish, disease and parasites from fish farms. These threats operate at both the local and broad geographic scale, singularly or in various combinations and with varying degrees of intensity. Climate change is likely to increase risk to salmon in the future, particularly those already vulnerable in southern locations.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Glowing green fish shine light on pollution

Glowing green fish shine light on pollution | In Deep Water | Scoop.it
Scientists have new insight into how pollution affects marine life thanks to the new florescent green zebrafish they created.

 

Chemicals in the ocean have long been wreaking havoc on the zebrafish's reproductive system.

 

So a team at the University of Exeter in England decided to test the fish's sensitivity to different chemicals that affect the estrogen hormone — stuff like ethinyloestradiol, used in the birth control pills and hormone replacement therapy treatments; nonylphenol, used in paints and industrial detergents; and Bisphenol A, which is found in many plastics.

 

They gave the fish a genetic system that amplifies the response to those chemicals, producing a fluorescent green light. Now, the researchers can see just what parts of the fish are responding to the pollutants.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Plastic garbage in oceans: Understanding marine pollution from microplastic particles

Plastic garbage in oceans: Understanding marine pollution from microplastic particles | In Deep Water | Scoop.it
Biologists have prepared guidelines for a more precise investigation into marine pollution from microplastic particles.

  

Large quantities of globally produced plastics end up in the oceans where they represent a growing risk. Above all very small objects, so-called microplastic particles, are endangering the lives of the many sea creatures. An estimate of how greatly the oceans are polluted with microplastic particles has so far failed in the absence of globally comparable methods of investigation and data. Together with British and Chilean colleagues, scientists of the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in the Helmholtz Association have now analysed all published studies on this topic and have proposed standardised guidelines for the recording and characterisation of microplastic particles in the sea.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Vast methane 'plumes' seen in Arctic ocean as sea ice retreats

Vast methane 'plumes' seen in Arctic ocean as sea ice retreats | In Deep Water | Scoop.it
Dramatic and unprecedented plumes of methane - a greenhouse gas 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide - have been seen bubbling to the surface of the Arctic Ocean by scientists undertaking an extensive survey of the region.

 

The scale and volume of the methane release has astonished the head of the Russian research team who has been surveying the seabed of the East Siberian Arctic Shelf off northern Russia for nearly 20 years. ...

 

Scientists estimate that there are hundreds of millions of tons of methane gas locked away beneath the Arctic permafrost, which extends from the mainland into the seabed of the relatively shallow sea of the East Siberian Arctic Shelf.

 

One of the greatest fears is that with the disappearance of the Arctic sea ice in summer, and rapidly rising temperatures across the entire Arctic region, which are already melting the Siberian permafrost, the trapped methane could be suddenly released into the atmosphere leading to rapid and severe climate change.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Beyond Pesticides Daily News Blog - Fisheries Service Tells EPA to Better Protect Endangered Species from Pesticides

Beyond Pesticides Daily News Blog - Fisheries Service Tells EPA to Better Protect Endangered Species from Pesticides | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

“This is a huge step forward for the health of our rivers,” said NCAP Environmental Health Associate Aimee Code. She continued, “These findings are a reminder that chemical pest control comes at a high cost. The true solution is to expand the use of non-chemical solutions.”

 

Glen Spain of PCFFA stated, “These pesticides are poisons and do not belong in salmon streams. The bottom line for us is that poisoning salmon rivers puts our people out of work as well as creates a public health hazard. It is far more cost effective to keep these poisons out of our rivers to begin with than to try to clean up messes afterwards.”

 

NMFS notified EPA that current use patterns for oryzalin, pendimethalin, and trifluralin are likely to jeopardize half of the 26 salmon populations on the West Coast protected by the ESA. All three pesticides belong to the dinitroaniline sulfonamide class of herbicides and are widely used in agricultural, lawn and home garden and right-of-way applications. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Marine mammals coming back to the Salish Sea

Marine mammals coming back to the Salish Sea | In Deep Water | Scoop.it
The shared inland waters of Juan de Fuca Strait, B.C.’s Strait of Georgia, and Washington state’s Puget Sound may once again approach its former greatness...

 

Thanks to conservation efforts, one marine mammal after another is making a dramatic comeback, their presence providing the biggest reason for hope across an ecosystem spanning 7,000 square kilometres.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

SAHFOS - Dramatic changes in the biology of the North Atlantic and North Sea

SAHFOS - Dramatic changes in the biology of the North Atlantic and North Sea | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

"... more unexpected was the discovery that the plankton shift is also strongly driven by an increase in the windiness in the North Atlantic region over the last 50 years. This increase in windiness is something that is often overlooked. In the ocean, windiness promotes vertical mixing of the water, which in turn has profound impacts on surface nutrients levels and the vertical distribution of plankton. In general, windier conditions seem to favour diatoms over dinoflagellates.

The new patterns show major shifts in the distribution of economically important species known to cause harmful effects through toxin poisoning. The wider implication of this discovery are not fully known, but the switch from dinoflagellates to diatoms is likely to have propagated up the food chain to impact much larger animals such as fish and whales."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Massive Die-off of Dolphins in Peru

Massive Die-off of Dolphins in Peru | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

"Under the current circumstances and after a long assessment of our Stranding Network, all the dolphins and porpoises stranded respond to one sole UME that started in middle January, and continues today. With all available count in an area of 350 Km of coastline with reported strandings from northern Piura to northern Lambayeque, we estimate around 3,000 dead dolphins so far. This is the largest mass stranding ever recorded in the coast of Peru and with no precedent in the South American region. "

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

The 5cience: The Secret Life of Plankton

The 5cience: The Secret Life of Plankton | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

"New videography techniques have opened up the oceans' microscopic ecosystem, revealing it to be both mesmerizingly beautiful and astoundingly complex. Marine biologist Tierney Thys has used footage from a pioneering project to create a film designed to ignite wonder and curiosity about this hidden world that underpins our own food chain."

Will interest children and adults alike. 

more...
No comment yet.