In Deep Water
1.9K views | +0 today
Follow
In Deep Water
A Pretty Kettle of Fish
Curated by David Rowing
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Sail-World.com - Plastic Oceans (Plastic in our playground!) Part 2 - Plastic bottles

Sail-World.com - Plastic Oceans (Plastic in our playground!)  Part 2 - Plastic bottles | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

So is it better for us or not? Well 40% of bottled water is actually filtered tap water. Some are known to be better, some worse. No matter what water brand you buy though, there is one key that should give us the answer. 


It is called a 'Used by date'. Water does not go off in rivers and lakes or in our taps so why does it have a used by date? It is because plastic water bottles contain toxins that leach into the water, contaminating it and also affecting the taste. It's that plastic taste you get occasionally. It's actually killing you slowly. What are these toxins? The big one is Bisphenol A (BPA). 

There are more and more studies these days on this toxin and it has been proven to cause breast cancer, ADHD, autism and the list continues to grow. To put it bluntly, toxins in plastic consumed during pregnancy is a major issue. Heating kids drinks and food in plastic just adds to the issue. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Sail-World.com - Plastic Oceans (Plastic in our playground!) Part 1 - Plastic bags

Sail-World.com - Plastic Oceans (Plastic in our playground!) Part 1 - Plastic bags | In Deep Water | Scoop.it
The ocean is our playground. We sail on it, we swim in it, we fish from it and without it we don't have 60-80% of the world's oxygen........So why do we abuse it? The reason we abuse it is because most of us don't even realise we are.

 

As a professional skipper in the Whitsundays I began pulling Dead Sea turtles out of the water so they could be inspected by marine parks. The key moment came when one of the turtles I pulled out was found to have a plastic bag formed perfectly in its stomach. It had died of starvation but not before trying to eat 12 cigarette butts, a plastic water bottle cap and 1/2 a coke can. I set out to educate people of the issue and this is my crusade. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Marine climate change report launched at World Fisheries Congress — smi

Marine climate change report launched at World Fisheries Congress — smi | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

The Marine Climate Change Impacts Partnership (MCCIP) launched its latest report card this week at the World Fisheries Congress in Edinburgh. It focuses on how climate change is affecting the fish and shellfish around the UK and Ireland because understanding this is fundamental to managing activities in our seas.

 

To produce this report the MCCIP commissioned three groups of scientists to consider how climate change is affecting marine fish, fisheries and aquaculture and what the social and economic consequences could be.

 

The key findings of the scientists documented in the 2012 report card include that there are clear changes in the depth, distribution, migration and spawning behaviours of fish - many of which can be related to warming sea temperatures; that cultivated fish and shellfish are both susceptible to climate change, although fish farming technologies offer good potential for adaptation; and that controlled or closed fishing areas (a type of protected area) that can be adapted in response to climate change have the potential to help protect commercial and vulnerable fish stocks.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Tidal turbine 'performing well'

Tidal turbine 'performing well' | In Deep Water | Scoop.it
A subsea turbine which uses tidal power to generate electricity has successfully completed initial tests off Orkney.

 

The turbine was lowered into position during winter storms and Scottish Power Renewables said it was performing well.

 

The 100ft-high 1MW (megawatt) Hammerfest Strom HS1000 device is already powering homes and businesses on the island of Eday.

 

There are plans to create a 10MW tidal power array in the Sound of Islay.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Peru: Warmer seas are blamed for bird carnage (PHOTOS)

Peru: Warmer seas are blamed for bird carnage (PHOTOS) | In Deep Water | Scoop.it
After widespread dolphin deaths, thousands of boobies and pelicans wash up on Peruvian beaches.

 

A lack of anchovies and other small fish triggered by unseasonably warm waters has left thousands of seabirds starving to death along Peru’s Pacific coast, experts say.

This month, the corpses of 5,000 birds, principally pelicans and boobies, have been discovered on beaches up and down the country, according to official government reports.

 

It is the second mass die-off this year in Peruvian waters, after hundreds of dolphin carcasses also mysteriously washed up on beaches in the northern regions of Piura, Lambayeque and Tumbes.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

10 Steps to a Healthy Ocean: Protecting our Oceans from Pollution

10 Steps to a Healthy Ocean: Protecting our Oceans from Pollution | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

The ocean covers more than 70% of the earth’s surface, and it’s a major part of the ecosystem that we rely on. Phytoplankton are responsible for about half of the oxygen produced worldwide. More than 1 billion people rely on fish for a significant part of their diet. The ocean provides food, recreation, clean air, carbon mitigation, inexpensive transport, and many other things that we take for granted. Yet, we’ve been treating the ocean like a dump for centuries. That may have been fine when society produced trash on a very small scale and all of things we threw away were biodegradable, but technology has changed that.

 

There are thousands of phantom fishing nets that keep killing fish after being abandoned. Sunken ships leak millions of gallons of oil and billions of styrofoam cups end up in the water every year. Even when these events happen thousands of miles away, they have a ripple effect that’s felt worldwide.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Hammerheads To Be Protected in Costa Rica and Honduras

Hammerheads To Be Protected in Costa Rica and Honduras | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

The governments of Honduras and Costa Rica have today proposed protections for scalloped hammerhead sharks under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).

 

According to the Pew Environment Group, who have praised the initiative, CITES is widely considered one of the best-enforced international conservation agreements. “It’s time for strong international protection for endangered scalloped hammerhead sharks,” said Maximiliano Bello, senior adviser to the Global Shark Conservation Campaign of the PewEnvironment Group. “Other governments should join Honduras and Costa Rica in supporting a sustainable future for these sharks.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Sightings of blue whales in the south of Chile has grown significantly

Sightings of blue whales in the south of Chile has grown significantly | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

“Even when the largest mammal on earth is still in the endangered species list, we’ve sighted around 115 groups of these cetaceans just a few miles off the coast from Valdivia”, said Rodrigo Hucke and Jorge Ruiz, responsible for the report which is basically a monitoring of the whales in the rich in nutrients waters of the Chiloé archipelago.


“What we are finding out is that as we move further north in our prospecting, the feeding area of the blue whales is far larger than we thought, we’re talking of 600 kilometres of lineal coast along which the whales feed”, added Huckle.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Swimmers' urine to blame for 500 fish deaths, German fishermen say

Swimmers' urine to blame for 500 fish deaths, German fishermen say | In Deep Water | Scoop.it
Swimmers have killed about 500 fish in a northern Germany lake, with their urine causing algae that poisons marine life.

 

The mass death in the past two weeks has occurred in Eichbaum lake, in the port city of Hamburg. "Swimmers who urinate in the lake are introducing a lot of phosphate," fishermen's spokesman Manfred Siedler told Bild newspaper. "We're calculating half a liter [0.15 of a gallon] of urine per swimmer per day."


Applying anti-phosphate -- at a reported cost of $667,000 -- hasn't worked, fueling an ongoing feud between fishermen and those who swim in the lake. Swimmers have been banned from the lake until the algae outbreak is addressed.

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Where Have All The Whales Gone?

Where Have All The Whales Gone? | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

The population of eastern Pacific gray whales shows a huge dip at the same point that whaling increased in the early 20th century, a new analysis of ancient whale genes shows.

 

Eastern Pacific gray whales are a subspecies of grey whale that lives in the Pacific Ocean, migrating from the Arctic to Mexico yearly. Their population is currently estimated to be around 20,000. They are up to 46 feet (14 meters) long and weigh up to 99,000 pounds (45,000 kilograms).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

An ocean of troubles

An ocean of troubles | In Deep Water | Scoop.it
The Ocean of Life: The Fate of Man and the Sea. By Callum Roberts. Viking; 390 pages; $30. Allen Lane; £25.

 

Overfishing, global warming and pollution threaten to transform the ocean—and perhaps life as we know it.

 

Traditional attitudes towards the sea, as something immutable and distant to humanity, are hugely out of date. ... The enormity of the sea’s troubles, and their implications for mankind, are mind-boggling. Yet it is equally remarkable how little this is recognised by policymakers—let alone the general public.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Study Finds Surprising Arctic Methane Emission Source - NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Study Finds Surprising Arctic Methane Emission Source - NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

"The fragile and rapidly changing Arctic region is home to large reservoirs of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. As Earth's climate warms, the methane, frozen in reservoirs stored in Arctic tundra soils or marine sediments, is vulnerable to being released into the atmosphere, where it can add to global warming. Now a multi-institutional study by Eric Kort of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., has uncovered a surprising and potentially important new source of Arctic methane: the ocean itself."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Mass pelican deaths in Peru caused by starvation, study finds

Mass pelican deaths in Peru caused by starvation, study finds | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

An initial study into the deaths of hundreds of Peruvian seabirds, mostly pelicans and boobies, on the country's northern beaches indicates they died of starvation due to a lack of their main food, anchovies.

 

The dead and dying seabirds have been littering beaches in Peru's northern regions of Ancash, La Libertad, Lambayeque and Piura. More than 1,200 were found in one nature reserve and numbers are expected to reach several thousand and rising.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

To see climate change, watch the sea

To see climate change, watch the sea | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

In addition to well-known currents near the surface of the sea, such as the Kuroshio current around the coast of south east Asia, Japan and China, there is a massive global current that flows unseen in the deep, thousands of metres below the surface, called oceanic general circulation.

 

Ocean water becomes heavier when it is colder and when it contains more salt. Around the polar regions, ocean water is cooled down by air and forms ice. Because the ice does not contain salt, the salinity of the surrounding sea water rises, which results in ocean water near Antarctica or the North Atlantic sinking to join oceanic general circulation.

The oceans are said to be able to hold about 1,000 times more heat than the atmosphere can. If all the oceanic water in the world released enough heat to reduce its own temperature by 0.01°C, the temperature of the atmosphere would be 10°C higher.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

The Vital Chain: Connecting The Ecosystems of Land and Sea by Carl Zimmer: Yale Environment 360

The Vital Chain: Connecting The Ecosystems of Land and Sea by Carl Zimmer: Yale Environment 360 | In Deep Water | Scoop.it
A new study from a Pacific atoll reveals the links between native trees, bird guano, and the giant manta rays that live off the coast.

 

"McCauley and his colleagues followed up that initial hunch with rigorous scientific tests. And it turned out they were right. Each hour that they spent surveying manta rays off the coast of native forests, the scientists encountered, on average, four fish. Off the coast of coconut palm stands, they found none. ...

 

When the scientists surveyed Palmyra’s birds, they found that the native forests had five times more birds than the palm forests. ...

McCauley and his colleagues also found that the zooplankton — the tiny animals that graze on the phytoplankton — was three times more abundant off the coast of native Palmyra forests than off the coasts of palm forests. ... "

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Effect of groundwater use: Using water from wells leads to sea level rise, cancels out effect of dams

Effect of groundwater use: Using water from wells leads to sea level rise, cancels out effect of dams | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

As people pump groundwater for irrigation, drinking water, and industrial uses, the water doesn't just seep back into the ground -- it also evaporates into the atmosphere, or runs off into rivers and canals, eventually emptying into the world's oceans. This water adds up, and a new study calculates that by 2050, groundwater pumping will cause a global sea level rise of about 0.8 millimeters per year.

"Other than ice on land, the excessive groundwater extractions are fast becoming the most important terrestrial water contribution to sea level rise," said Yoshihide Wada, with Utrecht University in the Netherlands and lead author of the study.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Time to tackle gillnets

Time to tackle gillnets | In Deep Water | Scoop.it
A number of BirdLife partners, including the RSPB, met in Berlin on 3-4 May to look at the problem of seabird bycatch in gillnet fisheries in Europe and identify best practice in ways to tackle the issue.

 

Gillnets kill many hundreds of thousands of seabirds a year in European waters – the birds go after fish, get caught up in the nets and then drown. The extent of the problem and how it’s affecting bird numbers is still unknown because of a lack of studies on the subject, but it could be very significant.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Arctic seabirds adapt to climate change

Arctic seabirds adapt to climate change | In Deep Water | Scoop.it
The planet is warming up, especially at the poles. How do organisms react to this rise in temperatures?

 

An international team led by a CNRS researcher from the Center for Functional and Evolutionary Ecology has shown that little auks, the most common seabirds in the Arctic, are adapting their fishing behavior to warming surface waters in the Greenland Sea. So far, their reproductive and survival rates have not been affected. However, further warming could threaten the species.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

“Wild Fish Will be Critical to Feeding the World” | The EnvironmentaList | Earth Island Journal | Earth Island Institute

“Wild Fish Will be Critical to Feeding the World” | The EnvironmentaList | Earth Island Journal | Earth Island Institute | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

Oceana CEO Andrew Sharpless estimates that if we managed the world’s oceans better, wild seafood could potentially be a major protein source for our world’s ever-growing population.

 

He says, “a fully productive ocean could provide the entire animal protein diet for a billion people, or 13 to 15 percent of the animal protein produced on the entire planet,” by 2050. His claim has been questioned by some fisheries economists, who say the numbers are way inflated, and by environmentalists opposed to the idea of promoting fish consumption at a time when the most of the world’s marine life is in peril. But the head of the largest international organization working to protect the world’s oceans, believes his theory makes practical sense, since one can’t effectively ban the eating of meat, fish, and animal protein.

 

I spoke with Sharpless about his “Save the Oceans and Feed the World” idea and other threats to oceans when he was in San Francisco last month. An excerpt from our conversation.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Life and Health: Fish tied to lower colon cancer risk

Life and Health: Fish tied to lower colon cancer risk | In Deep Water | Scoop.it
People who eat plenty of fish may have a lower risk of colon cancer and, even more, rectal cancer, according to an analysis of 41 studies from around the world.

 

The analysis, which appeared in the American Journal of Medicine, is the latest report that ties fish consumption to a number of possible health benefits. Jie Liang of Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases in Xi'an, China, and colleagues combined the results from 41 studies published between 1990 and 2011 that measured fish consumption and tracked cancer diagnoses. This included research from the United States, Norway, Japan, Finland and elsewhere.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Jellyfish blooms creating oceans of slime

Jellyfish blooms creating oceans of slime | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

" ... huge annual jellyfish blooms have been cropping up not just across the Mediterranean, but also the Black Sea, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Yellow and Japan Seas. Is this a bizarre blip in the continually changing balance of oceanic life, or the beginnings of a new state change in marine diversity?

 

... Last year alone, nuclear power plants in Scotland, Japan, Israel and Florida, and also a desalination plant in Israel, were forced to shutdown because jellyfish were clogging the water inlets. The entire Irish salmon industry was wiped out in 2007 after a plague of billions of mauve stingers – covering an area of 10 sq miles (26 sq km) and 35ft (11m) deep – attacked the fish cages. Two years later, a fish farm in Tunisia lost a year's production of sea bream and sea bass after jellyfish invasions.

 

Perhaps the most extraordinary blooms have been those occurring in waters off Japan. There, refrigerator-sized gelatinous monsters called Nomuras, weighing 485lb (220 kg) and measuring 6.5ft (2m) in diameter, have swarmed the Japan Sea annually since 2002, clogging fishing nets, overturning trawlers and devastating coastal livelihoods. These assaults have cost the Japanese fisheries industry billions of yen in losses."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Climate change and marine biodiversity: Saving the ocean’s web of life under threat

Climate change and marine biodiversity: Saving the ocean’s web of life under threat | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

Biodiversity is essential for human well-being, as it provides valuable services, such as food, medicines or clean air. At the same time, it is under threat from exposure to environmental degradation, pollution and unsustainable resource exploitation, like over-fishing. Climate change poses a new challenge as it often exacerbates the impacts of other pressures.

 

RAPIDLY rising greenhouse-gas concentrations are driving ocean systems toward conditions not seen for millions of years, with an associated risk of fundamental and irreversible ecological transformation.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Sleep with the fishes

Sleep with the fishes | In Deep Water | Scoop.it
A COUPLE of weeks ago Gulliver got excited by designs for a hotel in a disused Chinese quarry. This week it’s a futuristic underwater hotel off Dubai that is whetting the appetite.

 

Its structure comprises two massive discs, one above the water—and apparently out of tsunami reach—and the other below. They will be connected by three legs and a central shaft with a lift in it. (You can see some of the designs here.) Guests in the 21 submerged rooms get to look out of their windows onto the local marine life. Or at least that portion of the local marine life not scared away in permanence by the hotel's construction.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Navy Study Says Sonar And Blasts May Hurt More Sea Life

Navy Study Says Sonar And Blasts May Hurt More Sea Life | In Deep Water | Scoop.it
HONOLULU (AP) — The U.S. Navy may hurt more dolphins and whales by using sonar and explosives in Hawaii and California under a more thorough analysis that reflects new research and covers naval activities in a wider area than previous studies.

 

The Navy estimates its use of explosives and sonar may unintentionally cause more than 1,600 instances of hearing loss or other injury to marine mammals each year, according to a draft environmental impact statement that covers training and testing planned from 2014 to 2019. The Navy calculates the explosives could potentially kill more than 200 marine mammals a year.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Climate scientists discover new weak point of the Antarctic ice sheet | e! Science News

Climate scientists discover new weak point of the Antarctic ice sheet | e! Science News | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

"The Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf fringing the Weddell Sea, Antarctica, may start to melt rapidly in this century and no longer act as a barrier for ice streams draining the Antarctic Ice Sheet. These predictions are made by climate researchers of the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in the Helmholtz Association in the journal Nature. They refute the widespread assumption that ice shelves in the Weddell Sea would not be affected by the direct influences of global warming due to the peripheral location of the Sea."

more...
No comment yet.