In Deep Water
1.9K views | +0 today
Follow
In Deep Water
A Pretty Kettle of Fish
Curated by David Rowing
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Mount Everest glaciers have shrunk 13% in 50 years

Mount Everest glaciers have shrunk 13% in 50 years | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

Glaciers in the Mount Everest region have shrunk by 13 percent and the snow-line has shifted 180 meters (590 feet) higher during the past 50 years, according to a study that will be presented this week at a conference organized by the American Geophysical Union.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Floods could overwhelm London as sea levels rise - unless Thames Barrier is upgraded

Floods could overwhelm London as sea levels rise - unless Thames Barrier is upgraded | In Deep Water | Scoop.it
There is significant risk of London being hit by a devastating storm surge in the Thames estuary by 2100 that could breach existing flood defences and cause immense damage to the capital, a study of global sea-level rise has found.

 

Melting of polar ice sheets and mountain glaciers could increase sea levels significantly over the coming decades leading to a 1 in 20 risk that the existing Thames Barrier would be unable to cope with an extreme storm surge, the study concluded.

 

Extreme storm surges that can breach the barrier would in the past have occurred with a frequency of about 1 in 1,000 years, but in a warmer world they could occur as frequently as 1 in every 10 years, scientists said.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

'Best estimate' of melting ice caps

'Best estimate' of melting ice caps | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

Researchers have published their most advanced calculation for the likely impact of melting ice on global sea levels.

 

The EU funded team say the ice sheets and glaciers could add 36.8 centimetres to the oceans by 2100.

 

Adding in other factors, sea levels could rise by up to 69 centimetres, higher than previous predictions.

 

The researchers say there is a very small chance that the seas around Britain could rise by a metre.

 

The last Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report was highly detailed about many aspects of Earth's changing climate in the coming decades,

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Three male fish, the last of their kind, must find a mate or else go extinct

Three male fish, the last of their kind, must find a mate or else go extinct | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

If you happen to know of any female fish of the Mangarahara cichlid variety, the London Zoo would very much like to introduce her to a couple of extremely eligible bachelors.

 

The zoo's aquarium is home to two of the three remaining Mangarahara cichlids known to exist -- the only problem is, they're all males. So now, in a last-ditch bid to preserve the species from impending extinction, the zoo has issued a personal ad of sorts to find them a mate, titled 'Male Seeking Female: Must Want Kids'.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Hundreds of starving sea lion pups get a helping hand [Photos]

Hundreds of starving sea lion pups get a helping hand [Photos] | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

This spring, southern California has seen a massive number of sea lion pup strandings. Over 1,300 baby sea lions, born last summer, have stranded themselves and are being found up and down the coastline emaciated, dehydrated and enduring hypothermia. Scientists are looking for clues to understand why the sea lion youngsters seem to have been cut off from their food supply, leading to what NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service has deemed an "unusual mortality event."

 

Meanwhile, conservation photographer Morgan Heim travelled to the Pacific Marine Mammal Center to document the phenomenal effort workers and volunteers are putting into rescuing and caring for these youngsters so they can be released back into the wild. Here is their story in photos.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Oceans under surveillance

Oceans under surveillance | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

A ‘global conveyor belt’ stirs the oceans from top to bottom, with surface currents transporting warm water to the poles while cold water in the depths flows back to the tropics. But it operates in fits and starts, with the strength of the currents varying widely. Eager for a better understanding of how the vagaries of the conveyor belt shape weather and climate, oceanographers are planning two new large-scale projects to watch over Atlantic currents.

 

An array of instruments between Florida and the Canary Islands has been continuously monitoring the strength of the North Atlantic portion of the global conveyor belt since 2004. In December, if all goes well, an international project led by the United States will begin another set of continuous measurements of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), using an array of sensors strung between South Africa and Argentina. And this month, US and British funding agencies are set to decide whether they will support a new surface-to-bottom monitoring array between Labrador in Canada and Scotland, UK. The United Kingdom will also decide whether to continue operating the existing array.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Guadeloupe and Martinique threatened as pesticide contaminates food chain

Guadeloupe and Martinique threatened as pesticide contaminates food chain | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

On 15 April more than 100 fishermen demonstrated in the streets of Fort de France, the main town on Martinique, in the French West Indies. In January they barricaded the port until the government in Paris allocated €2m ($2.6m) in aid, which they are still waiting for.


The contamination caused by chlordecone, a persistent organochlorine pesticide, means their spiny lobsters are no longer fit for human consumption. The people of neighbouring Guadeloupe are increasingly angry for the same reason. After polluting the soil, the chemical is wreaking havoc out at sea, an environmental disaster that now threatens the whole economy.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Blaschka Glass Menagerie Inspires Marine Expedition

Blaschka Glass Menagerie Inspires Marine Expedition | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

Two 19th-century glassmakers created a collection of anatomically perfect sculptures of marine creatures. Now, a hunt is on to find the animals that inspired them. ...

 

I’ve been a marine biologist my entire professional life, spending more than 25 years researching the health of corals and sustainability of reefs. I’m captivated by the magic of sessile invertebrates like corals, sponges and sea squirts — creatures vital to the ecosystem yet too often overlooked in favor of more visible animals like sharks and whales.

 

The filmmaker David O. Brown and I want to change that. To make a documentary, “Fragile Legacy,” we are on a quest to lure these elusive and delicate invertebrates in front of the camera lens.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

The superglue inspired by world's stickiest fish - which can hold up to 230 times its own bodyweight

The superglue inspired by world's stickiest fish - which can hold up to 230 times its own bodyweight | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

The world's stickiest fish, with an adhesive force up to 230 times its bodyweight, is set to inspire a new household superglue, according to researchers in North Carolina. 


The small Northern Clingfish is found in the Pacific, off the north west coast of the the US. 


It uses modified fins as a suction disk to hold onto the underside of rocks amid crashing waves.

 

more...
Katrina M.'s curator insight, May 8, 2013 1:47 PM

This fish must be very sticky!

Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

GM salmon's global HQ – 1,500m high in the Panamanian rainforest

GM salmon's global HQ – 1,500m high in the Panamanian rainforest | In Deep Water | Scoop.it
Supersized genetically modified salmon grow fast and fat and after years of wrangling, are ready for market – but is the market ready for them? And why is the firm hidden away in Panama?

 

It is hard to think of a more unlikely setting for genetic experimentation or for raising salmon: a rundown shed at a secretive location in the Panamanian rainforest miles inland and 1,500m above sea level.

 

But the facility, which is owned by an American company AquaBounty Technologies, stands on the verge of delivering the first genetically modified food animal – a fast-growing salmon – to supermarkets and dinner tables.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Australian endangered species: Northern River Shark

Australian endangered species: Northern River Shark | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

The Northern River Shark (Glyphis garricki) is one of the rarest species of shark in the world. It is known only from a small number of locations in Western Australia, the Northern Territory and Papua New Guinea. Discovered in Australia in 1986, only 36 specimens have been recorded here since.

 

The Northern River Shark is a 2.5-3 metre long shark belonging to a family known aswhaler or requiem sharks. Its closest relative in Australia is the Speartooth Shark, also found in northern rivers and estuaries and listed as Endangered by the IUCN. Distinguishing between the two is difficult, but is based on the location of the “waterline”, the point where the darker upper-body colouring of the shark changes to lighter lower colour.

more...
Selena Whiu's curator insight, May 7, 2013 11:42 AM

Close to home shark. 

Good reading.

Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Can Nutrient Trading Shrink the Gulf of Mexico's Dead Zone? | WRI Insights

Can Nutrient Trading Shrink the Gulf of Mexico's Dead Zone? | WRI Insights | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

The Gulf of Mexico has the largest dead zone in the United States and the second-largest in the world. Dead zones form when excessive amounts of nitrogen and phosphorous wash into waterways and spur algal blooms, depleting the water of oxygen and killing fish, shrimp, and other marine life.

 

The Gulf of Mexico dead zone can range between an astounding 3,000 and 8,000 square miles. At its largest, it’s about the size of Massachusetts.

Reducing this growing dead zone problem is a huge scientific, technical, economic, and political challenge. It’s a conundrum that agricultural and environmental experts from across the United States will deliberate this week at the Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Task Force meeting in Louisville, Kentucky.

 

One new approach they’ll discuss is voluntary nutrient trading. According to a new study conducted by WRI staff for the EPA, this strategy could be used in the Mississippi River Basin to cost-effectively reduce nitrogen and phosphorous pollution and shrink the Gulf of Mexico dead zone.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

South West sea birds 'probably killed by PIB'

South West sea birds 'probably killed by PIB' | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

A substance thought to be responsible for the deaths of more than 350 birds is probably the same as that which affected hundreds earlier in the year, experts have said.

 

Scientists from Plymouth University said they were "almost certain" it was polyisobutene (PIB).

 

It is often used by ships to make their engines work more efficiently.

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) said it would try to determine the source.

 

Hundreds of birds have been found on beaches in Devon and Cornwall since Wednesday.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Seagrass carbon sinks fast disappearing: study

Seagrass carbon sinks fast disappearing: study | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

Rising sea levels will lead to a drastic decline in seagrass stocks, a new study has found, but reducing water pollution may help offset the effects.

Seagrass is crucial to slowing climate change because of its remarkable capacity to absorb greenhouse gases, with some experts saying it is as important as forests in the fight against global warming.

 

The study, conducted by University of Queensland researchers published in the journalGlobal Change Biology, examined seagrass meadows along Queensland’s Moreton Bay.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Shipping chemical 'unsafe for birds'

Shipping chemical 'unsafe for birds' | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

Wildlife charities are calling for tighter regulations to protect seabirds from a group of chemicals that caused hundreds of seabirds to be washed up off the south coast of England.

 

The number of seabirds affected by the recent spill of polyisobutene (PIB) has now reached 4,000, said the RSPB.

 

The sticky chemical is used as a lubricant in ships' engines.

 

It is also moved in large quantities, as it is used to make chewing gum, adhesive tape and sealants.

 

The organisations are appealing to theInternational Maritime Organization (IMO) to "reclassify" the chemical.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Rabbits of the river: Trout are not native to Australia

Rabbits of the river:  Trout are not native to Australia | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

esterday’s announcement of the removal of trout from a small creek in the Alpine National Park to protect a critically endangered native fish highlights the problem that is trout.

 

Trout have been so successfully and so pervasively introduced into Australian freshwater systems that most people now think that they are native. The truth is that trout have caused the extinction or demise of many freshwater fish and invertebrate species, including some excellent angling fish such as the Murray cod, Macquarie perch and trout cod.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

FSA calms fears over dioxins in Baltic salmon

FSA calms fears over dioxins in Baltic salmon | In Deep Water | Scoop.it
The FSA has calmed fears following claims that salmon that potentially contains dioxins above EU safe limits has been exported to other EU member states by Swedish companies.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Are seagulls killing whales in Patagonia?

Are seagulls killing whales in Patagonia? | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

It sounds ludicrous, but it could just be true: scientists say seagulls may be responsible for hundreds of southern right whale moralities off the Argentine coastline. Since 2003, scientists have documented the deaths of 605 southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) near Península Valdés which the whales use as a nursery. Notably, 88 percent of these were newborn calves. The death rate is so high that researchers now fear for the whales' long-term survival.

"The southern right-whale population is still only a small fraction of its original size, and now we have reason to worry about its recovery," Vicky Rowntree with the Ocean Alliance and the University of Utah says. "Our long-term data indicate that the Península Valdés whales were increasing steadily at close to 7% per year until recently. Elevated calf mortality is reducing that growth rate substantially (by nearly a third in one estimate). If this continues, we just don’t know what will happen."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Swedish salmon sales 'breached ban'

Swedish salmon sales 'breached ban' | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

Firms in Sweden have sold about 200 tonnes of Baltic salmon in Europe despite an EU ban targeting toxic chemicals in fish, officials say.

 

The ban does not apply to Baltic salmon sold to domestic consumers in Sweden, Finland and Latvia. But the sellers are required to give advice about safe limits for consumption, set by the EU.

 

Dioxins found in Baltic herring and salmon prompted the EU ban in 2002.

 

A French firm imported 103 tonnes of Swedish salmon, but no longer does so.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Rare 'Pink Dolphins' Are In Danger, Conservationists Warn

Rare 'Pink Dolphins' Are In Danger, Conservationists Warn | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

Chinese white dolphins, nicknamed "pink dolphins," are rarely spotted in Hong Kongwaters. However, the near-threatened species is becoming even more uncommon, and conservationists warn that Hong Kong risks losing the dolphins altogether unless immediate action is taken.

 

According to the Hong Kong Dolphin Conservation Society, the number of pink dolphins in waters surrounding the city have dropped significantly in recent years from 158 in 2003 to 78 in 2011, the Agence France-Presse reports. However, the current pink dolphin population may be even smaller since the 2012 statistics have yet to be released.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Arctic Ocean 'acidifying rapidly'

Arctic Ocean 'acidifying rapidly' | In Deep Water | Scoop.it
Scientists from Norway's Center for International Climate and Environmental Research monitored widespread changes in ocean chemistry in the region. They say even if CO2 emissions stopped now, it would take tens of thousands of years for Arctic Ocean chemistry to revert to pre-industrial levels. Many creatures, including commercially valuable fish, could be affected. They forecast major changes in the marine ecosystem, but say there is huge uncertainty over what those changes will be.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Land O' Lakes: Melting Glaciers Transform Alpine Landscape - SPIEGEL ONLINE

Land O' Lakes: Melting Glaciers Transform Alpine Landscape - SPIEGEL ONLINE | In Deep Water | Scoop.it
Climate change is dramatically altering the Swiss Alps, where hundreds of bodies of water are being created by melting glaciers. Though the lakes can attract tourists and even generate electricity, local residents also fear catastrophic tidal waves.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

The Colorado River named most endangered river in America [Video]

The Colorado River named most endangered river in America [Video] | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

American Rivers released their report on the most endangered rivers in the states. At the top of the list is, sadly, one of the most iconic and beautiful rivers: The Colorado.

 

Amy Kober writes on National Geographic's NewsWatch, "Outdated water management across the basin is inadequate to respond to the pressures of over-allocation and persistent drought. According to the Bureau of Reclamation’s Colorado River Basin Water Supply and Demand Study (December 2012), there is not enough water in the Colorado River to meet the basin’s current water demands, let alone support future demand increases. Scientists predict climate change will reduce the Colorado River’s flow by 10 to 30 percent by 2050."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Yangtze porpoise down to 1,000 animals as world's most degraded river may soon claim another extinction

Yangtze porpoise down to 1,000 animals as world's most degraded river may soon claim another extinction | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

A survey late last year found that the Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis) population has been cut in half in just six years. During a 44-day survey, experts estimated 1,000 river porpoises inhabited the river and adjoining lakes, down from around 2,000 in 2006.


The ecology of China's Yangtze River has been decimated the Three Gorges Dam, ship traffic, pollution, electrofishing, and overfishing, making it arguably the world's most degraded major river. These environmental tolls have already led to the likely extinction of the Yangtze river dolphin (Lipotes vexillifer), or baiji, and possibly the Chinese paddlefish (Psephurus gladius), which is one of the world's longest freshwater fish.

"The [Yangtze finless porpoise ] is moving fast toward its extinction," said Wang Ding, head of the research expedition, with the Institute of Hydrobiology (IHB) at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. IHB organized the expedition along with China's Ministry of Agriculture, the Wuhan Baiji Conservation Fund, and WWF-China.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Rowing
Scoop.it!

Dead dolphins and shrimp with no eyes found after BP clean-up

Dead dolphins and shrimp with no eyes found after BP clean-up | In Deep Water | Scoop.it

Hundreds of beached dolphin carcasses, shrimp with no eyes, contaminated fish, ancient corals caked in oil and some seriously unwell people are among the legacies that scientists are still uncovering in the wake of BP's Deepwater Horizon spill.

 

This week it will be three years since the first of 4.9 million barrels of crude oil gushed into the Gulf of Mexico, in what is now considered the largest marine oil spill in the history of the petroleum industry. As the scale of the ecological disaster unfolds, BP is appearing daily in a New Orleans federal court to battle over the extent of compensation it owes to the region.

more...
Selena Whiu's curator insight, May 7, 2013 11:43 AM

Diagram to help show consequences of something like the oil spill.

How would it have been different if it had happened in NZ?

What are the similarities to the Rena disaster in Tauranga?