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Scaling Up Excellence | Official Site

Scaling Up Excellence is the newest book by bestselling author Robert Sutton and Stanford colleague Huggy Rao. Published by: Crown Publishing Group
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

Leaders who aim to boost organizational performance frequently start with efforts to inspire good behavior, however they define it. Yet research shows that if you want to spread excellence, eradicating the negative is the first order of business. Destructive behavior—packs a far bigger punch than constructive behavior. Organizational researcher Andrew Miner and colleagues discovered, for example, that negative interactions with bosses and coworkers had five times more influence on employees’ moods than positive interactions.  Bad behavior undermines improvement efforts by introducing confusion, destructive conflicts, distrust, and dead ends; to extend and sustain good behavior, you’ve first got to root out the bad. Seven methods can help.

 

1. Focus on the improving the worst parts and the end.   Research by Daniel Kahneman uncovered the “peak–end rule”: no matter how good or bad an experience is or how long it lasts, judgments about it are shaped most strongly by the best and worst moments and by how it ended.  To improve individuals’ experiences first fix the worst parts or the bad outcomes. 

2. Plumbing before poetry:  Getting people to focus on small, mundane, and gritty details is a necessity for eliminating negativity. In Stanford’s James March’s language, you’ve got to fix the plumbing before you spout the poetry. When many things are broken talking about values and strategy backfires, it reinforces the idea that management is out of touch.  Instead, tackling small problems at a more personal or grassroots level by involving those suffering negative consequences conveys understanding and shows a path to improvement.

3. Nip it in the bud. The best bosses nip bad behavior in the bud but treat people with dignity. Many employees who are prone to selfishness, nastiness, cheating, and laziness change their ways after getting feedback and coaching or moving to a workplace where such behavior isn’t tolerated.

4. Use the ‘good citizens’ to define and curb bad behavior. Enlisting good role models for spreading desired behaviors has a large impact on success. Recruit the most admired and connected people in your enterprise, teach them what “desired behavior” looks like, and encourage them to fastidiously avoid “bad” behavior.

5. Link bad short-term behavior with negative long-term consequences.  You can sometimes break bad patterns by getting people to think about who they hope to be, not just who they are. Hal Hershfield and his colleagues’ research at New York University shows that people are more prone to behave unethically when they are preoccupied with their present selves,  but when people focus on the link between who they are now and who they want to be in the future, they behave more ethically and engage in other constructive long-term behavior.  A key to encouraging employees to look to the future involves finding ways to make the link between negative short-term actions and long-term consequences more apparent to them.

6. Acceptability before excellence.  The first order of business is to drive out counter-productive behavior before you can spread something fruitful. This may be obvious, but as Jeffrey Pfeffer says, great managers are masters of the obvious and rare. So, for example, moving from poor customer service to satisfactory customer service is a prerequisite to excellent service.  It is essential to understand what makes service bad before trying to make it great.

7. Destroy the joy.  Mark Twain said, “There is a charm about the forbidden that makes it unspeakably desirable.”  Sometimes permitting something that was once forbidden is enough to change bad behavior.  According to University of Toronto’s Gary Latham, allowing employees to borrow equipment for personal use at any time immediately eliminated the theft of a million dollars’ worth of equipment a year.   Interestingly it was almost never checked out by employees.  It seems once the thrill or prestige of getting away with the thefts was removed, the motivation to steal was eliminated.
 

Three lessons for improving effectiveness and performance come through unmistakably:

-Understand what specific behavior must change to achieve excellence.

-Focus on improving the negatives first, these are what people (inside and outside the organization) notice and react to most.

-Embrace continuous improvement; smaller incremental change may be less inspirational, but it is more likely to succeed.

 

 

This summary was based in part on McKinsey and Co review of this book. 

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Improving Organizational Effectiveness & Performance
Focuses on Tools for Leaders and Managers that Enhance Organization Results: #EmpoweringEffectiveness
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Empowering Improved Organizational Performance Through Organizational Effectiveness

Empowering Improved Organizational Performance Through Organizational Effectiveness | Improving Organizational Effectiveness & Performance | Scoop.it

This resource collects and presents tools and techniques to support efforts to improve enterprise results regardless of organization industry or type.  Comments and remarks seek to clarify the relevance or value of enhanced organizational effectiveness as a means of achieving better performance. 

Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

Improved Organizational Effectiveness can be achieved in a number of ways.  The Empowering Effectiveness Model categorizes these paths to effectiveness in four categories:

 

=> Broad Alignment-ensuring clear direction and focus are pervasive throughout the organization
 

=> Robust Engagement-establishing a level of commitment that drives effort regardless of current circumstances 
 

=> Sustainable Adaptation-maintaining the capacity to anticipate and meet current and future challenges. 
 

=> Superb Execution-unceasingly pursuing excellent performance and performance improvement.   

 

A critical element in the on-going journey to improved effectiveness is Purposeful Leadership.  Such leadership involves finding the best ways to promote organizational success.  

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Organizational Culture & Organizational Effectiveness

Organizational Culture & Organizational Effectiveness | Improving Organizational Effectiveness & Performance | Scoop.it
Organization culture seems to play a critical role when it comes to individual, group, and organizational effectiveness. Symbols are bundles of meaning that simultaneously tie together emotional &cognitive experience.

Via Andre K Stockmann
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

Although it's nice to know that culture can affect organizational effectiveness, this is hardly a magic bullet. Even if there is such a thing as a "culture of effectiveness", which I doubt, we still need to know the elements of the culture and the more difficult details of how to create it. I can offer only a starting point; four factors that are critical for organizational effectiveness and that should be supported or embodied in an organizations culture are: robust employee engagement; broad alignment with organizational purpose; emphases on superb execution and improvement of work processes; and sustainable adaptation and organization agility to cope with the need for change. Symbols, norms and values consistent with these  four factors are a minimum, I believe for a culture of effectiveness, but still a long way from defining such a culture. 

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Stakeholder Mapping for Collaboration

Stakeholder Mapping for Collaboration | Improving Organizational Effectiveness & Performance | Scoop.it

Collaboration is an important factor for successful innovation and change. Indeed, collaboration is an imperative for most organizations today, including any organization undergoing change. Innovation requires collaboration between individuals, as well as systemic forms of collaboration that span silos, networks and surprising connections. And yet collaboration cannot be mandated. Collaboration just doesn’t work like that.

 

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

Collaboration is an organizational necessity; effective organizations excel at and continuously strive to improve it

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Ignasi Alcalde's curator insight, July 14, 6:46 AM

#Collaboration #Innovation circle.

Claude Emond's comment, July 14, 9:13 AM
Most stakeholder «management» tools and techniques are based on measuring (whatever it means) Power and Influence. This is mostly done without open discussion with the stakeholders and highly manipulative in its intent. It does not either consider meta game and alliance among unlikely collaborators. The model you found, Kenneth is thus a pace towards a better way, something that «engage» stakeholders instead of «managing/trying to manipulate» them. Thanks a lot :)
Claude Emond's curator insight, July 14, 9:20 AM

Most stakeholder «management» tools and techniques are based on measuring (whatever it means) Power and Influence. This is mostly done without open discussion with the stakeholders and highly manipulative in its intent. It does not either consider meta game and alliance among unlikely collaborators. This model is thus a pace towards a better way, something that «engage» stakeholders instead of «managing/trying to manipulate» them.

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Leadership is Not a Contest

Leadership is Not a Contest | Improving Organizational Effectiveness & Performance | Scoop.it
I live in a culture that makes everything a contest. We take metaphors from sports and try to apply them to every activity of life. We live in a time when the language of athletics has become abbreviations to describe how we live. We have created a culture in which a Hail, Mary has become …

Via Anne Leong
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

I agree leadership is a collaborative endeavor more than a competitive one, but let's not say we cannot learn from other mistakes as well as our own. Let's not say that coming up with better ways to do what others have done is not beneficial. It our job as leaders to do the best we can to help our organizations' achieve their purposes; it is rarely, if ever true that our purpose is solely defeating other organizations. 

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Steps to Personal Effectiveness

Steps to Personal Effectiveness | Improving Organizational Effectiveness & Performance | Scoop.it

Is there a connection between personal effectiveness and organizational effectiveness?  Certainly deciding on a course of action in a systematic way would seems  like it might help with organizational management, but will it help with improving organizational effectiveness. 


Via Barb Jemmott
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

          One thing that distinguishes effective organizations from less effective ones is that capacity to consistently make good decisions.  It is not simply the fact of making decisions, but the fundamental soundness of those decisions.  This suggests that while deciding what to do is important; it is how or on what basis decisions are made that is critical.  

         The four elements of the Empowering Effectiveness OE model  provide a good starting point for decisions: How does a particular action enhance alignment, execution, adaptation or engagement?

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3 Ideas For Navigating Change In The Office Without Freaking Everyone Out

3 Ideas For Navigating Change In The Office Without Freaking Everyone Out | Improving Organizational Effectiveness & Performance | Scoop.it
Many employees fear change at work. Here's how managers can navigate changes in procedure without overwhelming their staff.

Via the Change Samurai
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

It is certainly valuable to allow involvement and influence in making changes; people generally respond better to changes they understand and value and are much more likely to do so if they are involved in its planning and implementation. Simply "educating" people does not take into account their specific situation or concerns and so may help make the unfamiliar more familiar, the unknown more known, but still leaves individuals circumstances unaddressed. 

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Organizational Effectiveness Lecture Series - Holistic Appreciative Inquiry

This event is part of the Organizational Effectiveness Lecture Series at Wright State University where we discuss how to influence positive change in your organization. Dr. Ilma Barros shares...
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

Appreciative inquiry is valuable in building effective  organizations because it engages a wide cross-section in understanding how the organization can improve. The positive involvement of organization members on working on issues that are important can be very helpful and helps overcome any biases that consultants and facilitators bring.  The assumption, however, that the organization knows best what's best for it should be surfaced and tested; we must be vigilant about blind spots--our own and others.  

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Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s curator insight, June 13, 1:01 PM

Appreciative inquiry is valuable in building effective  organizations because it engages a wide cross-section in understanding how the organization can improve. The positive involvement of organization members on working on issues that are important can be very helpful and helps overcome any biases that consultants and facilitators bring.  The assumption, however, that the organization knows best what's best for it should be surfaced and tested; we must be vigilant about blind spots--our own and others.  

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Making Projects Successful: Organizational Traits | Manufacturing ...

Making Projects Successful: Organizational Traits | Manufacturing ... | Improving Organizational Effectiveness & Performance | Scoop.it
In an HBR article, “The Secrets to Successful Strategy Execution,” Gary L. Neilson, Karla L. Martin, and Elizabeth Powers identified 17 fundamental traits of organizational effectiveness, drawn from a survey of more than ...
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

Executing Strategy well is clearly a characteristic of effective organizations; but achieving broad alignment with organizational purposes, having robust employee engagement within the organization, and using flexible, adaptable ways for getting work done and responding to  changes are also key ingredients that synergisticly combine with superb execution to create highly effective, successful organizations

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To lead, influence and sell better, ask the right questions.

The right questions help us to lead, influence and sell better. Here are ten ways to ask the right questions.
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

Greater self-awareness through self-assessment is always a good tactic for leaders to understand and improve how they influence their organizations. 

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Three Ways to Actually Engage Employees - blogs.hbr.org (blog)

Three Ways to Actually Engage Employees - blogs.hbr.org (blog) | Improving Organizational Effectiveness & Performance | Scoop.it
Three Ways to Actually Engage Employees
blogs.hbr.org (blog)
In short, employee engagement is directly related to leaders' ability to inspire people — and it is pretty much unrelated to leaders' effectiveness at assigning and managing tasks.
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

Engagement behavior is a a function of both the person and his or her "organizational"  environment.  Selecting people  who value and are motivated by what they do to help an organization achieve its purposes is the most important aspect of the person piece.  Training and providing the right resources that enable successful performance is the most important environmental piece.  Retaining people over the long-term  and inspiring their discretionary contribution is a matter of reinforcing the perception that this their organization is the best way for them to obtain what they need and want from their working life. 

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5 Keys That Unlock Better Organizational Effectiveness

5 Keys That Unlock Better Organizational Effectiveness | Improving Organizational Effectiveness & Performance | Scoop.it
Everyone wants to make a big impact when it comes to organizational effectiveness.

Via Chris Enstrom
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

These five sets of activities that take place in organizations are definitely important and making them better can certainly improve effectiveness. The Empowering Effectiveness approach provides more specific guidance on how they might be improved: 

 

    Aligning these activities with organizational  purposes is critical. Engaged people will put more of themselves into these activities. Designing in flexibility and adaptability will enable the organization to be configured in the best ways to accomplish these activities, and emphasizing excellent process execution and continuous improvement will insure these activities are being done well, consistently and efficiently.  

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Chris Enstrom's curator insight, June 13, 10:46 AM

#6 - everything is connected, make sure you know the implications of making changes in a system.

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Accellerated Method To Organizational Effectiveness ...Organizational Constellations

Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

Interesting approach to building organizational effectiveness.  It takes a rather holistic approach to OE and presupposes that resolving a variety of issues inevitably leads to improved OE.  From my perspective, targeting some specific issues related to OE is more likely to accelerate OE improvement. 

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4 Ways to Take Global Leadership Development to the Next Level ...

4 Ways to Take Global Leadership Development to the Next Level ... | Improving Organizational Effectiveness & Performance | Scoop.it
It seems inconceivable that the effectiveness of global leadership development efforts is declining in a time when organizations are increasingly working with global partners, suppliers, customers, and employees.
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

These four recommendations are critical for building the kind of leadership that agile, adaptive organizations need going forward. Achieving organizational purposes will require greater skills in managing organizational changes, engaging people inside and outside the organization,  and ensuring superb execution

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Forget Lean and Agile – It’s Time to be Anticipatory

Forget Lean and Agile – It’s Time to be Anticipatory | Improving Organizational Effectiveness & Performance | Scoop.it
We are all good at reacting and responding, putting out fires, and crisis management. In addition, organizations large and small have learned how to be lean and agile, and how to best execute a

Via Ron McIntyre
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

Well. don't completely forget about Lean and Agile. Just broaden the perspective. Lean and agile imply readiness and responsiveness which are good things. But they should not imply "reactive-ness"; . responding well to current circumstances  is simply not enough. Anticipating, forecasting, predicting, as well as possible, future needs and conditions is also critical.

 

The assumptions that present conditions will prevail and simple improvements up existing processes or  activities will remain sustainable is unwise. Effective organizations both adapt and strive to improve their adaptability. This can be described as sustainable adaptation.

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, July 22, 10:34 AM

I have been advocating proactive management for decades so it seems the time has come.  What do you think?

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 22, 7:55 PM

Reacting and responding are two different things. Reacting is often a spur of the moment and off the cuff action that has little thought behind. Response, which is often understood as synonymous, is a measured process of thinking and acting. The word response is the root word for responsibility. Even in being lean and agile, we should be responsible and thoughtful in our responses.

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Three Secrets of Organizational Effectiveness - strategy+business

Three Secrets of Organizational Effectiveness - strategy+business | Improving Organizational Effectiveness & Performance | Scoop.it
Three Secrets of Organizational Effectiveness strategy+business When the leaders of a major retail pharmacy chain set out to enhance customer satisfaction, market research told them that the number one determinant would be friendly and courteous...
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

Well not terribly new, not particularly secret but still helpful. Autonomy, clear purposes, and recognition are described as sources of pride but we've known about these for quite some time in connection with high performance. More specifically, all of the ideas referred to: pride, trust, autonomy, purpose and recognition are associated with employee engagement--a key driver of organizational effectiveness in the #empoweringeffectiveness model.

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What happens in 60 sec on Facebook, Twitter, Google, Instagram, Tumblr and Pinterest

What happens in 60 sec on Facebook, Twitter, Google, Instagram, Tumblr and Pinterest | Improving Organizational Effectiveness & Performance | Scoop.it

According an infographic from Qmee in 60 seconds, 293K statuses are updated on Facebook, WordPress bloggers share 1.8K new blog posts, web users download 15K songs, and Instagramers upload 67K photos.

 

"We all know activity on the Internet on a daily basis moves at lightening speed, but there's something about having the numbers in front of you that makes it just a little bit more fascinating."

 

This infographic looks at what happens in just one minute on social web...


Via Jeff Domansky
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

Gives you a real sense of the kinds of change we must must deal with every day

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J. Nolfo's curator insight, July 14, 8:15 AM

What happens in 60 sec on Facebook, Twitter, Google, Instagram, Tumblr and Pinterest.  Fascinating infographic.

Jodi Dichter Kaplan's curator insight, July 14, 10:19 AM

What happened in your business the last 60 seconds?  Let Peak Reputation, Inc. enhance your online reputation and help you to convert better. #peakreputation #effectivemarketing

Елена Гончарова's curator insight, July 14, 12:58 PM

добавить понимание ...

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Effective Delegation Can Impact Organizational Effectiveness - Delegating Not Only Saves Time and Money, It’s a Real Motivator!

The many benefits of delegating. http://t.co/9psTLfSfPm #association #associationmanagement #leadership... http://t.co/Oh7xQLtKQy
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

And why shouldn't it? Sharing power or control, trusting someone, are part of delegating and are a great way to build engagement. Engagement, in turn involves extra commitment and contributions and leads to cheaper and  better results. This is by definition more effective. 

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The Employee Engagement Hoax - Forbes

The Employee Engagement Hoax - Forbes | Improving Organizational Effectiveness & Performance | Scoop.it


Somewhere around the late 1980s or early 1990s we stopped talking about employee morale and started talking about Employee Engagement instead.


Via David Hain
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

      I like the engagement concept, but it has been twisted to suit a management perspective that is unhelpful. It is helpful to think of engagement as behavioral and emotional commitment; this results in loyalty to the company a willingness to stay and provide discretionary effort. A prerequisite to engagement is employee satisfaction and positive morale.

 

      The problem with engagement arose because it was presented in many instances as a tool for driving performance. Consultants and pollsters latched onto the idea that if you measured engagement you could then take various actions to change it with a variety of employee focused HR tools. All of sudden then HR had the means, it believed, to drive, employee performance-- and, of course, how could this not be valuable for business and management.

     In fact, engagement is useful because it begins to address the complexity of motivating organizational behavior. It helps us understand that both intrinsic and extrinsic factors should be considered, that the social conditions are important as well. Engagement points to the fact that a whole person approach is needed to fully enlist individual efforts on behalf of the organization.

 

      To obtain a truly engaged workforce, enterprises must start with choosing people who see it as more than simply a place to work;who see it as a valuable, useful means to a positive end for themselves and the broader community of which they are a part. Enterprises must come to the realization that supporting individuals in reaching their goals is the cost of getting individuals to support the organization's.

 

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David Hain's curator insight, July 7, 1:44 AM

"The chief benefit of the annual Employee Engagement Survey is that it lets a tone-deaf HR leader say to her leadership team, “Look how high our engagement scores are this year! Surely I’m doing my job!”" ~ Liz Ryan

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 7, 10:08 AM

The one that gets me is the empowerment racket. As if we have the power to give someone else power. I hear this in education all the time. We are going to empower students as if we do their learning for them. Creating a positive and healthy learning environment with reciprocal relationships is the key.

Miguel Paul Trijaud Calderón's curator insight, July 9, 6:38 AM

Engagement - 12 ideas to listen to your employees

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Why Workplace Learning Fails, And Why It's Time to Ban The Fire Hose

Why Workplace Learning Fails, And Why It's Time to Ban The Fire Hose | Improving Organizational Effectiveness & Performance | Scoop.it
Most people love to learn for learning’s sake. So you’d think training -- particularly in soft-skills areas like sales and leadership -- would be seen as a path to better results, more money and coveted promotions. And yet we often hear, “Jeez, they’re pulling me off the job for some stupid [...]

Via Holly MacDonald
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

The article makes an excellent point training should be a process not an event.  Coaching is one example provided. The  key here is to make it part of the job, a relevant means to an end.   Mandated training is attended, but useful, accessible, timely, relevant training is attended to. The simple logic is that if your people believe that training will help then it probably will. Effective Organizations with their engaged employees  can be confident that good training processes will be sought out and stick. 

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Alternatives to Traditional Employee Reviews

Blog posting with content from Kevin Lombardo's insights on employee reviews in the Denver Business Journal. (Performance management and organization effectiveness go hand in hand.
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

Useful if somewhat superficial; the article emphasizes the importance of a collaborative rather than confrontational approach to performance reviews.   It helps to understand that the overarching goals for both manager and employee in performance management is the achievement of the organizations goals and purposes. When employees have the skills, knowledge (training), resources and support to achieve these, they are fully enabled and (hopefully) highly motivated to invest their discretionary efforts and make larger contributions to organizational success. Managers' roles become more like coaches, resource providers and advocates for employees to ensure there are no obstacles to top performance.  (As described elsewhere, performance management is a useful tools for achieving closer alignment of organizational activities with organizational purposes and this closer alignment is indicative of improved organizational effectiveness).

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Performance management done well improves Organizational Effectiveness

Aubrey C. Daniels is the author of the bestselling management classic Performance Management: Changing Behavior that Drives Organizational Effectiveness, recently re-released in a fifth addition.
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

Aligning with organizational purposes is one key element in organizational effectiveness, and performance management is an important tool for achieving this. 

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How to Help an Underperformer

How to Help an Underperformer | Improving Organizational Effectiveness & Performance | Scoop.it

Don’t ignore the problem


Too often these issues go unaddressed.  “Most performance problems aren’t dealt with directly,” says Weintraub. “More often, instead of taking action, the manager will transfer the person somewhere else or let him stay put without doing anything.” This is the wrong approach. Never allow underperformance to fester on your team. It’s rare that these situations resolve themselves. It’ll just get worse. You’ll become more and more irritated and that’s going to show and make the person uncomfortable,” says Manzoni. If you have an issue, take steps toward solving it as soon as possible.

 


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor, Bobby Dillard, Bond Beebe Accountants & Advisors
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

The assumption often is that poor performance is  result of some problem with the performer, but it would be wise to examine the circumstances closely because is it a common bias for people to attribute others failures to them and de-emphasize the situation factors that may be contributing.   Compounding this, we as managers often are biased in seeing our own success as the result of our efforts and failures as a result of happenstance and not our shortcomings— making it still harder for us to see how we might contribute to others' poor performance. 

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Tony Phillips's curator insight, June 24, 9:25 PM

A great article worth practical ways to improve performance. ALL managers should be coached to do this type of thing.

Jill Miller, SPHR's curator insight, June 26, 6:39 PM

It's tempting to delay dealing with under performers, but they rarely improve on their own. This article provides actionable advice that works in the real world. 

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Organizational Effectiveness Consultant - Nuclear Power Careers ...

Organizational Effectiveness Consultant - Nuclear Power Careers ... | Improving Organizational Effectiveness & Performance | Scoop.it
KeySource HCI has been exclusively retained by Southern Nuclear Operating Company in search of an Organizational Effectiveness Consultant. Southern Nuclear Operating Company, headquartered in Birmingham, ...
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

The nuclear power industry has long embraced Organization Development and Organizational Effectiveness.  Opportunities like these are a great way to help the industry get better from the inside out. 

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Organizational Effectiveness Lecture Series - Holistic Appreciative Inquiry

This event is part of the Organizational Effectiveness Lecture Series at Wright State University where we discuss how to influence positive change in your organization. Dr. Ilma Barros shares...
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

Appreciative inquiry is valuable in building effective  organizations because it engages a wide cross-section in understanding how the organization can improve. The positive involvement of organization members on working on issues that are important can be very helpful and helps overcome any biases that consultants and facilitators bring.  The assumption, however, that the organization knows best what's best for it should be surfaced and tested; we must be vigilant about blind spots--our own and others.  

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Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s curator insight, July 3, 10:25 AM

Appreciative inquiry is valuable in building effective  organizations because it engages a wide cross-section in understanding how the organization can improve. The positive involvement of organization members on working on issues that are important can be very helpful and helps overcome any biases that consultants and facilitators bring.  The assumption, however, that the organization knows best what's best for it should be surfaced and tested; we must be vigilant about blind spots--our own and others.  

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P2P Foundation » Blog Archive » Wirearchy 1: The Intersection of ...

To make matters worse, the final decade I was consultant with a major HR / organizational effectiveness consulting firm helping many large and multi-national organizations design and implement their ever-changing ...
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

Organizational design has always been about creating the relationships needed for people to effectively collaborate to get the work done. This approach presents a model of how we might accomplish this in a more egalitarian way; one that relies less on differences in power and more on modern technology. 

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The Global Leadership Competencies We Aren't Teaching - Chier Learning Officer

The Global Leadership Competencies We Aren't Teaching - Chier Learning Officer | Improving Organizational Effectiveness & Performance | Scoop.it
The Global Leadership Competencies We Aren't Teaching
Chier Learning Officer
Study analyses found creativity to be significantly correlated to both market performance and global leadership development effectiveness.
Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s insight:

Creating agile and adaptive organizations may be about more than managing change if understood narrowly.  However, innovation, thinking strategically about the organization's circumstances, understanding technology developments, and creative problem-solving are all about change and a broader approach to change management will often include them.  The purposeful leadership model from Empowering Effectiveness includes Adaptive Patterns as one core leadership discipline--ensuring the organization is configured to effectively manage change.  Along with these Aligning with Purpose, Engaging People, and Executing Processes are critical leadership domains.

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