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Scooped by Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM from PARP Inhibitors Cancer Review
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(Cancer) Drug Costs: How high can they go?

(Cancer) Drug Costs: How high can they go? | Immunology and Biotherapies | Scoop.it

The first of a promising new class of cancer drugs went on sale in Japan this week at an average annual cost of $143,000 a patient, a harbinger of hefty prices the new drugs are expected to command in the U.S.and Europe in coming months.  Bristol-Myers, which plans to market nivolumab in the U.S. if the FDA clears it for sale, declined to say how much it will charge. A spokeswoman said the company prices its medicines based on “the value they deliver to patients and society, the scientific innovation they represent and the investment required to support” drug research-and-development.

 

Higher prices for new cancer drugs have become an increasing concern for patients and their families, who often shoulder high copayments. At the same time, the PD-1 drugs “have the potential to be game-changers for a lot of people” because patients in studies have had “meaningful, long-term responses” to the drugs. PD-1 targeting drugs have shown strong cancer-fighting results in clinical trials.

 

Bristol-Myers, which plans to market nivolumab in the U.S. if the FDA clears it for sale, declined to say how much it will charge. A spokeswoman said the company prices its medicines based on “the value they deliver to patients and society, the scientific innovation they represent and the investment required to support” drug research-and-development. Bristol-Myers has been marketing another kind of cancer immunotherapy, Yervoy, as a melanoma treatment in the U.S. since 2011 at a cost of $120,000 a patient for a standard, complete course of treatment.


Via Pharma Guy, Krishan Maggon
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Pharma Guy's curator insight, September 5, 2014 1:03 PM


On Quora, I posted the question: "How close are the pharmaceutical companies to "curing" cancer?" (see here) and got some interesting feedback. Dan Munro (@danmunro), Founder / CEO - iPatient, had this to say:


"While curing a given cancer is clearly a worthwhile goal - it is often not the primary focus - and early detection is still the leading indicator of successfully treating all cancers. Some cancers are simply pushed so far into remission that you're more likely to die of a different cancer or old age in your sleep. It's not a technical cure - but it's a practical one.

"The sad reality is this: The death rate for cancer (adjusted for the size and age of the population) has dropped only 5% from 1950 to 2005 (see here). 


So, (1) the reality is that the death rate for cancer hasn't improved very much in the past 50 years, and (2) pharma's little "pills" haven't contributed much to that statistic. Shame on Bayer for taking credit where none is due!

Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, September 5, 2014 7:07 PM

High cost of new life saving cancer and HCV drugs. Increasing safety and efficacy bar means limited chances of success and higher costs for the pharma biotech industry due to regulatory burden.

Refadoc.com's curator insight, September 9, 2014 7:54 AM

http://www.refadoc.com/tag/cancer

Scooped by Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM from Immunopathology & Immunotherapy
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"Adoptive T-Cell" Immunotherapy Shows Activity Against Advanced Ovarian Cancer in Phase I Study

"Adoptive T-Cell" Immunotherapy Shows Activity Against Advanced Ovarian Cancer in Phase I Study | Immunology and Biotherapies | Scoop.it

In a new study, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine show that a two-step personalized immunotherapy treatment — a dendritic cell vaccine using the patient’s own tumor followed by adoptive T cell therapy — triggers anti-tumor immune responses in advanced ovarian cancer patients.


Via Alfredo Corell
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Alfredo Corell's curator insight, February 10, 2013 5:55 AM

Most ovarian cancer patients are diagnosed with late stage disease that is unresponsive to existing therapies. In a new study, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine show that a two-step personalized immunotherapy treatment — a dendritic cell vaccine using the patients’ own tumor followed by adoptive T cell therapy — triggers anti-tumor immune responses in these type of patients. Four of the six patients treated in the phase I trial responded to the therapy, the investigators report this month in OncoImmunology.

 

Direct link to the journal: http://www.landesbioscience.com/journals/oncoimmunology/article/22664/?show_full_text=true&

Scooped by Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM from ORGANIC CHEMISTRY INTERNATIONAL
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Dendritic cell-based nanovaccines for cancer immunotherapy

Dendritic cell-based nanovaccines for cancer immunotherapy | Immunology and Biotherapies | Scoop.it
Current Opinion in Immunology

Volume 25, Issue 3, June 2013, Pages 389–395

 

Dendritic cell-based nanovaccines for cancer immunotherapyLeonie E Paulis1,Subhra Mandal1,Martin Kreutz,Carl G FigdorDepartment of Tumor Immunology, Nijmegen Center for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coi.2013.03.001, How to Cite or Link Using DOI


Via Alfredo Corell, Anthony M Crasto DR.
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Alfredo Corell's curator insight, July 27, 2013 2:59 PM

Cancer immunotherapy critically relies on the efficient presentation of tumor antigens to T-cells to elicit a potent anti-tumor immune response aimed at life-long protection against cancer recurrence. Recent advances in the nanovaccine field have now resulted in formulations that trigger strong anti-tumor responses. Nanovaccines are assemblies that are able to present tumor antigens and appropriate immune-stimulatory signals either directly to T-cells or indirectly via antigen-presenting dendritic cells. This review focuses on important aspects of nanovaccine design for dendritic cells, including the synergistic and cytosolic delivery of immunogenic compounds, as well as their passive and active targeting to dendritic cells. In addition, nanoparticles for direct T-cell activation are discussed, addressing features necessary to effectively mimic dendritic cell/T-cell interactions.