Immigration to the U.S from Mexico & Europe
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Primary Source: Push and Pull Factors of migrating from Mexico to the U.S essays

Push and Pull Factors of migrating from Mexico to the U.S essaysThere are many different push and pull factors that push migrants away from Mexico and pull them into the United States, especially California. A major factor that encourages migrants to go ahead and move is the proximity. California is
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This essay talks about how many people from Mexico move into the United States because of poverty. The population of poverty is 40% that’s one of the biggest push factors to the United States. The unemployment rate is at 3.3% along with the underemployment rate of 25%. One of the pull factors from the United States is that minimum wage is required. Being paid under minimum wage is legal and that is what attracts immigrants to come to the U.S.  Another big pull is that the United States offers a lot if employment to those who are willing to cut grass, pick up trash and other tough out door jobs. 

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The History of Immigration Policies in the U.S. | NETWORK

The History of Immigration Policies in the U.S. | NETWORK | Immigration to the U.S from Mexico & Europe | Scoop.it
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What I learned about this website is that Mexicans were sent back to Mexico during the great depression in the 1930’s. After the Mexican war the United States claimed California, Texas, Arizona, New Mexico and parts of Colorado, Utah and Nevada. Mexicans were working the United States while living in Mexico. That didn’t seem to be a problem until the 1930’s. Even Mexican Americans that were citizens of the United States were deported. 

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Push and Pull Factors: 19th Century Migration: Newfoundland and Labrador Heritage

Push and Pull Factors: 19th Century Migration: Newfoundland and Labrador Heritage | Immigration to the U.S from Mexico & Europe | Scoop.it
Push and Pull Factors--19th Century Migration--Society--Newfoundland and Labrador Heritage Web
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What I have learned from this website is that Newfoundland and Labrador let a lot of immigrants into their land. Soon enough the population went from 19,000 in 1803 to 75,000 in 1836. Immigrants were being pushed from their country.  They were glad that they were now living better economically they wanted to escape hunger, poverty, and overcrowded living conditions. This happened during the 19th century. 

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Amnesty Ends the American Dream | FrontPage Magazine

Amnesty Ends the American Dream | FrontPage Magazine | Immigration to the U.S from Mexico & Europe | Scoop.it
Welfare immigration is not an investment in the future.
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Immigrants are planning a huge amnesty that could ne four times bigger than the last one. Politicians from both sides believe that legalizing illegal aliens will better our economy, but not our population. States that have a great majority of illegal aliens tend to have more unemployment rates. Since 2004 the United States has been taking in millions on immigrants a year. About 2 million of immigrants received permits to enter the United States from 2000-2009. 

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Early Immigration in the U.S - The North:1800s to 1850s

Early Immigration in the U.S - The North:1800s to 1850s | Immigration to the U.S from Mexico & Europe | Scoop.it
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What I learned from the website is that people were struggling economically and that’s why they came over to the U.S.  That’s what was called the “Pull”.  Europeans were coming to the U.S because of their overcrowding in their country.  So many people from Britain, Ireland, Germany, Sweden, Denmark, and China came to the United States. They were being pushed away from their native country because of population growth. Farmers didn’t have much land to grow their crops in. 

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