Immigration from Mexico & Europe to the U.S. during WW2
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Article Vocabulary

Article Vocabulary | Immigration from Mexico & Europe to the U.S. during WW2 | Scoop.it
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Socioeconomic: Relating to or concerned with the interaction of social and economic factors.

         *Example: Socioeconomic factors seem to be intensifying the experience.

 

Asylum: The protection granted by a nation to someone who has left his or her native country as a political refugee.

         *Example: Granting asylum foreigners persecuted for            political reasons

 

Naturalize: Admitting a foreigner to citizenship of a country.

        *Example: He was a naturalized U.S. citizen born in Germany.

 

Reunification: Restore political unity to a place or group esp. a divided territory.

*Example: Charlemagne’s attempts to reunify western Europe.

 

Disintegration: The process of losing cohesion or strength.

*Example: The twin problems of economic failure and social disintegration.

 

Noteworthy: Interesting, significant, or unusual

*Example: It is noteworthy that no one in the bank has accepted responsibility for the failure.

 

Fiscal: Of relation to government revenue, esp. taxes.

*Example: Monetary and fiscal policy.

 

Credential: A qualification, achievement, personal quality, or aspect of a person’s background, typically when used to indicate that they are suitable for something.

*Example: Recruitment is based mainly on academic credentials.

 

 

Detriment: A state of being harmed or damaged.

*Example: He is engrossed in his work to the detriment of his married life.

 

Municipal: Of relating to a city or town or its governing body.

*Example: National and municipal elections.

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SOAPS Doc #2 Mexican Immigrants in the United States

SOAPS Doc #2 Mexican Immigrants in the United States | Immigration from Mexico & Europe to the U.S. during WW2 | Scoop.it
Over the past five decades, Mexicans have constituted the single largest group of immigrants to the United States originating from Latin America. In 2011, 11.7 million Mexican immigrants resided in the United States, representing 29 percent of the US immigrant population and close to 4 percent of the overall US population. This article examines the latest data on Mexican immigrants in the United States, including population size, geographic distribution, admission categories, and demographic and socioeconomic characteristics.
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This article is about Mexican immigration in the modern day United States. It is relatable to the topic because it gives the reader insight of how Mexican immigration has affected America and how the number of immigrants has increased over the years.

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Website Review #2: United States Policy Toward Jewish Refugees, 1941–1952

Website Review #2: United States Policy Toward Jewish Refugees, 1941–1952 | Immigration from Mexico & Europe to the U.S. during WW2 | Scoop.it
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SOAPS Doc #1: The Official Bracero Agreement

SOAPS Doc #1: The Official Bracero Agreement | Immigration from Mexico & Europe to the U.S. during WW2 | Scoop.it
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This is a set of rules and regulations from the original Bracero Program Agreement."For the temporary migration of Mexican agricultural workers to the United States as revised on April 26 1943, by an exchange of notes by the American Embassy at Mexico City and the Mexican ministry for foreign affairs."

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Website Review #3: United States Policy and its Impact on European Jews

Website Review #3: United States Policy and its Impact on European Jews | Immigration from Mexico & Europe to the U.S. during WW2 | Scoop.it
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European countries like Britain, France, Belgium and the Netherlands allowed a limited number of Jews to immigrate within their territories. Before 1938 many of these Jewish refugees started disappearing as Nazi Germany gained control over Europe. Overtime the course of time more and more Jews began disappearing and rumors of these disappearances being the, result of mass murders began to spread. On December 17, 1942 all the Allied governments issued a declaration that would reveal Hitler’s plan to annihilate the Jewish race in Europe. After, being under pressure by the American Jews and his Secretary of State, President Roosevelt established the War Refugee Board on January 22, 1944.

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Website Review #1: Bracero_Program_PowerPoint.pdf

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It was established by an executive order on July 1942, and was enacted into Public Law 78 in 1951. This program served the purpose of letting Mexicans work in agricultural and industrial jobs. The agreement was expected to be a temporary effort assuming it would last until the war ended. “Braceros worked on farms and on railroads, making it possible for the U.S. economy to meet the challenges imposed by the war effort.”

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