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Rescooped by Melanie Hundley from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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Forget writing out your biz stories! The art of storytelling

Forget writing out your biz stories! The art of storytelling | immersive media | Scoop.it
When leaders first learn about business storytelling quite often their first instinct is to write their stories down, in full with all the flourish they hope to convey in the retelling.
This is a mistake.

Via Karen Dietz
more...
Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 3, 2013 8:12 AM

What a great post from colleague Shawn Callahan about most people's tendency to want to write out their business stories and the advice to NOT do so.


What??!! Yes. Resist this temptation. Callahan explains why and what to do instead. Follow his advice. And if you absolutely must write down your stories -- do so and them set it aside. Scripted stories and sounding like a robot are not allowed! 


All really good storytellers know the limitations of writing down their stories. So keep building your improv storytelling skills for maximum results.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

Marty Koenig's curator insight, October 5, 2013 5:47 PM

This is key. The hard part is learning how an entrepreneur becomes a great story teller. 

Rescooped by Melanie Hundley from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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Storytelling -- A Skill That Benefits Every Area Of Your Life

Storytelling -- A Skill That Benefits Every Area Of Your Life | immersive media | Scoop.it
storytelling

Via Karen Dietz
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malek's curator insight, September 30, 2013 6:47 AM

A big part of our life hangs around storytelling. Long, link-filled article, but you'll enjoy the prespective.

Karen Dietz's comment, September 30, 2013 7:59 AM
Albert -- good point! Authors need to be careful not to overwhelm readers with too many links.
Karen Dietz's comment, September 30, 2013 8:00 AM
It is a bit long as Malek says, and I did find it pretty easy to scan.
Rescooped by Melanie Hundley from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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The Identifiable Victim Effect and How It Affects Your Storytelling

The Identifiable Victim Effect and How It Affects Your Storytelling | immersive media | Scoop.it
To use the identifiable victim effect in marketing, we first need to understand the psychological underpinnings of this quirk. Let's explore, shall we?

Via Karen Dietz
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Carol Sanford's curator insight, June 27, 2013 4:01 PM

This is related to the brain's need to connect the absract and concrete. Innovation, learning and thinking anything new,  are all made possible by having an idea and making sense of it in our real lives. Storytelling is the same. The ideas in it need to be connected to concreteness, therefor a name, for it to 'sink in'.

Karen Dietz's comment, June 29, 2013 3:03 PM
So true Carol! I very much appreciate the comment and insight.
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s curator insight, June 29, 2013 7:13 PM

If a concept is too big, we can become overwhelmed.  It's easier to see how we could help one person, but it can be hard to see how we could help dozens, thousands, or millions.

 

Fellow curator Karen Deitz's comments (see below) summed up this article beautifully.

"One of the biggest mistakes I see that corporations, non-profits, and individuals make when sharing their business stories is they talk about 'a person' or 'a group' without giving them names and characteristics. In other words, whoever they are talking about are not identifiable.

 

If we don't have a name to hang on to, we can't connect. We want to connect with people. Without a name, 'a person' or 'a group' is just a concept."

Rescooped by Melanie Hundley from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

Forget writing out your biz stories! The art of storytelling

Forget writing out your biz stories! The art of storytelling | immersive media | Scoop.it
When leaders first learn about business storytelling quite often their first instinct is to write their stories down, in full with all the flourish they hope to convey in the retelling.
This is a mistake.

Via Karen Dietz
more...
Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 3, 2013 8:12 AM

What a great post from colleague Shawn Callahan about most people's tendency to want to write out their business stories and the advice to NOT do so.


What??!! Yes. Resist this temptation. Callahan explains why and what to do instead. Follow his advice. And if you absolutely must write down your stories -- do so and them set it aside. Scripted stories and sounding like a robot are not allowed! 


All really good storytellers know the limitations of writing down their stories. So keep building your improv storytelling skills for maximum results.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

Marty Koenig's curator insight, October 5, 2013 5:47 PM

This is key. The hard part is learning how an entrepreneur becomes a great story teller. 

Rescooped by Melanie Hundley from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

Taming The Last 10%: Finishing Meaningful Work & the Role of Stories

Taming The Last 10%: Finishing Meaningful Work & the Role of Stories | immersive media | Scoop.it
Struggling to complete that big work project painting or manuscript These inspiring tips from creative masters Shakespeare and less likely sources...

Via Karen Dietz
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Annette Simmons's comment, August 21, 2013 12:53 PM
Perfect. I use historical stories and autobiographies the same way. I like fairy tales that haven't had the wisdom altered out of them as well. Thanks for the links!
Karen Dietz's comment, August 21, 2013 8:37 PM
Great points Kristen! And I agree with you too Annette. "Sanitized" fairy tales really don't do us much good.