immersive media
1.1K views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Melanie Hundley from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

Forget writing out your biz stories! The art of storytelling

Forget writing out your biz stories! The art of storytelling | immersive media | Scoop.it
When leaders first learn about business storytelling quite often their first instinct is to write their stories down, in full with all the flourish they hope to convey in the retelling.
This is a mistake.

Via Karen Dietz
more...
Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 3, 2013 8:12 AM

What a great post from colleague Shawn Callahan about most people's tendency to want to write out their business stories and the advice to NOT do so.


What??!! Yes. Resist this temptation. Callahan explains why and what to do instead. Follow his advice. And if you absolutely must write down your stories -- do so and them set it aside. Scripted stories and sounding like a robot are not allowed! 


All really good storytellers know the limitations of writing down their stories. So keep building your improv storytelling skills for maximum results.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

Marty Koenig's curator insight, October 5, 2013 5:47 PM

This is key. The hard part is learning how an entrepreneur becomes a great story teller. 

Rescooped by Melanie Hundley from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

Storytelling That Moves People--balance dark and light

Storytelling That Moves People--balance dark and light | immersive media | Scoop.it
Business management magazine, blogs, case studies, articles, books, and webinars from Harvard Business Review, addressing today's topics and challenges in business management. (Great insight re: story power for business!

Via Karen Dietz
more...
Karen Dietz's curator insight, July 10, 2013 5:30 PM

And -- drum roll -- here's the second article for today on storytelling and leadership. Something must be in the air! Of the hundreds of articles I've looked at today, this and the other one on 'Complexity, Leadership and Storytelling' stand out.


The article starts out very predictably -- why storytelling is important for leaders. No news there.


But keep reading! Here is what I do like: the authors Robert McKee (famous scriptwriter) and Bronwyn Fryer (HBR Senior Editor) dig into the need for leadership stories to NOT be all sweetness and light. That to be truly effective, stories need to have a bit of the dark included. And they talk about this quite a bit in the article.


Without being depressing or pessimistic.


My only bone to pick (and yes, I'm picky picky) is that the article talks about persuasion when what they really mean is influence. Persuasion is more characterized as a KITA (kick-in-the-a...) or 'carrots and sticks' while influence is more about inspiring/empowering someone to take action. We are all masters of KITA. Influence is trickier. So when you go through this article, substitute 'influence' for 'persuasion' for a truer reading.


For better biz storytelling, follow McKee's advice here. Balance dark with the light. You will gain more influence.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

Scooped by Melanie Hundley
Scoop.it!

Just Story It - Scoops

Just Story It - Scoops | immersive media | Scoop.it

Here are the best articles from across the web that I can find on using stories and storytelling in business.

I've chosen them because they actually make a contribution to our knowledge and wisdom about stories, show us how to apply stories to growing our businesses, or give valuable how-to tips.

 

I weed out all the junk. And besides, who needs another post in why storytelling is important?? Where's the beef?? We want the meat!

 

I've written reviews of each article to share what I like best, what you can get from reading the article, or what may be missing in the article.

 

How To Find A Topic: Click on the Filter tab above, and type in a keyword. All the articles with that keyword will appear.

 

I may occassionally review an article that I think is problematic as a way to educate us all, although most I will simply pass over.  If you wonder if I've seen an article that is not included here, send me a message and I'll respond.

After doing biz story work for over a decade (and with a PhD in Folklore) I hope you find many great insights and tips here. Many thanks for visiting and enjoy the articles!

 

And I hope you will also visit my website for more tips and tools, & take the free Story IQ assessment so you can see how well developed your storytelling skills and knowledge is: http://www.proprofs.com/quiz-school/story.php?title=storytelling-skills-ni-part- 

more...
Karen Dietz's comment, August 13, 2013 12:03 PM
Thank you!
Karen Dietz's comment, August 14, 2013 5:18 PM
Hey Bart! Thanks for letting me know about the broken link. I'll let the tech folks at Scoop.it know. In the meantime, here's the correct link: www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it
ManufacturingStories's curator insight, September 7, 2013 8:15 AM

Karen is dedicated to the art of Storytelling as a key tool in running a business or any other type of endeavor.  Here at ManufacturingStories.com we fully support this art form as the best way to generate positive and effective change.  Thanks Karen for all of your dedicated and tireless work! It's a tood Story!!

Rescooped by Melanie Hundley from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

Forget writing out your biz stories! The art of storytelling

Forget writing out your biz stories! The art of storytelling | immersive media | Scoop.it
When leaders first learn about business storytelling quite often their first instinct is to write their stories down, in full with all the flourish they hope to convey in the retelling.
This is a mistake.

Via Karen Dietz
more...
Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 3, 2013 8:12 AM

What a great post from colleague Shawn Callahan about most people's tendency to want to write out their business stories and the advice to NOT do so.


What??!! Yes. Resist this temptation. Callahan explains why and what to do instead. Follow his advice. And if you absolutely must write down your stories -- do so and them set it aside. Scripted stories and sounding like a robot are not allowed! 


All really good storytellers know the limitations of writing down their stories. So keep building your improv storytelling skills for maximum results.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

Marty Koenig's curator insight, October 5, 2013 5:47 PM

This is key. The hard part is learning how an entrepreneur becomes a great story teller. 

Rescooped by Melanie Hundley from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

The Identifiable Victim Effect and How It Affects Your Storytelling

The Identifiable Victim Effect and How It Affects Your Storytelling | immersive media | Scoop.it
To use the identifiable victim effect in marketing, we first need to understand the psychological underpinnings of this quirk. Let's explore, shall we?

Via Karen Dietz
more...
Carol Sanford's curator insight, June 27, 2013 4:01 PM

This is related to the brain's need to connect the absract and concrete. Innovation, learning and thinking anything new,  are all made possible by having an idea and making sense of it in our real lives. Storytelling is the same. The ideas in it need to be connected to concreteness, therefor a name, for it to 'sink in'.

Karen Dietz's comment, June 29, 2013 3:03 PM
So true Carol! I very much appreciate the comment and insight.
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s curator insight, June 29, 2013 7:13 PM

If a concept is too big, we can become overwhelmed.  It's easier to see how we could help one person, but it can be hard to see how we could help dozens, thousands, or millions.

 

Fellow curator Karen Deitz's comments (see below) summed up this article beautifully.

"One of the biggest mistakes I see that corporations, non-profits, and individuals make when sharing their business stories is they talk about 'a person' or 'a group' without giving them names and characteristics. In other words, whoever they are talking about are not identifiable.

 

If we don't have a name to hang on to, we can't connect. We want to connect with people. Without a name, 'a person' or 'a group' is just a concept."