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Storytelling and the Brain: An awesome chat with neuroscientist Paul Zak

Storytelling and the Brain: An awesome chat with neuroscientist Paul Zak | immersive media | Scoop.it
Paul has developed a ZEST score, the Zak Engagement STatistic, which can
highly predict the action a viewer will take after watching a piece of
content. More than whether somebody enjoys a film, or it makes them feel
good, his ZEST score actually predicts action–will they sign-up for an
email list, make a donation, or buy a product?

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 5, 2016 6:03 PM

Here's some of the latest on the neuroscience of storytelling with neuroscientist Paul Zak.

 

During the interview Zak talks about why our favorite stories aren't necessarily the ones that inspire us to act, that we seek connection above all else, and he shares what kind of story arcs people do go after (not every story arc is compelling).

 

Enjoy this romp through storytelling with Zak.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

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Analyzing Deng Adut Short Film: The Neuroscience of Storytelling

Analyzing Deng Adut Short Film: The Neuroscience of Storytelling | immersive media | Scoop.it
Emotion and storytelling - Not a day goes by where we don’t hear about their importance in advertising. So what can the brain tell us about these two fundamental aspects of communication?

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, July 12, 2016 12:49 PM

If you are into the neuroscience of storytelling, this post is for you. Peter Pynta of Neuro Insight shares his company's research on films from Cannes 2016 and which parts of stories get encoded into long term memory.

 

In this article they analyze a fab short film of a man called Deng Adut. The film is 1min. 30 sec. long. In real time you get to see how people's brains react to the film. Every time the graph goes above the top line, that piece of the film is getting stored into long term memory. So cool.

 

There are other links in the article about additional Neuro Insight research on storytelling and long term memory. The company's focus is only on applying their research to the advertising industry, but I think we can all learn from their results.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

Art Jones's curator insight, July 13, 2016 10:41 AM

We humans have been sharing stories since the beginning of time. We've always known that stories have a captivating way of calling people to take action. 

 

Today science provides us with proof of the power of story. This article dissects one short video and illustrates for us those scenes that evoke emotion and are stored into our long term memory and the parts we pass on.

 

 

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Beau Lotto On Perception + Storytelling: How We Experience the Meaning We Create

2015 Future of StoryTelling Summit Speaker: Beau Lotto Neuroscientist & Founder, Lottolab Apply to attend: www.fost.org Beau Lotto’s research into…

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 6, 2015 12:04 PM

What a great 4.24 minute video! Here neuroscientist Beau Lotto from the UK talks about human perception, how our perception is linked to storytelling, and how we create meaning for ourselves and others.


He also talks about social media and what that means for storytelling. Lotto shares what to do next -- how to think about storytelling and what steps to take to ensure a better future.


Anyone in business can benefit from Lotto's work -- whether you are a leader, trainer, or marketer. This video is good stuff to know about, think about, and do something about.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it @kdietz

Insight Narrator's curator insight, October 7, 2015 5:05 AM

This video highlights the challenges we have in trying to tell stories with data and the importance of turning passive, uni dimensional information that can appear purely conceptual, into a tangible story that relates to the physical world that we experience.  That is why metaphors work so well in data storytelling - they help us relate to something that is already real in our minds.

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Storytelling Neuroscience -- Rethinking Training + Online Courses

Storytelling Neuroscience -- Rethinking Training + Online Courses | immersive media | Scoop.it
How can the neuroscience of storytelling help you create online courses?

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 28, 2014 4:20 PM

This article by Ahmed Mori of SchoolKeep is written for educators but applies to anyone in business doing training or delivering online courses. There are great points made here about:

  • your brain on stories
  • tips to take advantage of storytelling
  • and a few cautionary thoughts


Here is what I like about the post:

  1. There is a clear research example given confirming that storytelling process both sensory parts of the brain while concurrently stimulating language processing areas.
  2. That stories do more than inform or entertain -- they stimulate critical thinking skills, capture non-linear situation complexities, and construct new knowledge.
  3. There is such a thing as bad storytelling.
  4. That the "storytelling" of marketing is a misnomer


The only point I take exception to is a quote by author Christian Salmon of Storytelling: Bewitching the Modern Mind, who says that "stories are moving away from being spontaneous cultural practices to methods of manipulation citing examples like George W. Bush, Steve Jobs,..." 


Oh please. Manipulation with stories has been going on for 100,000 years. Think the Crusades, the European witch hunts, the Holocaust, etc. But also think of Winston Churchill, Gandhi, and Christ. That's why we need to get really smart about storytelling -- both as storytellers and listeners.


And storytelling remains just as spontaneous as it ever was, thank you very much!


OK -- off to my accountant's office. While I'm gone, go read this really good article and I'll post my next article + review tomorrow.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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The Science Behind Why Great Stories Spread

The Science Behind Why Great Stories Spread | immersive media | Scoop.it
In the second of a two-part series Jonathan Gottschall discusses the unique power stories have to change minds and the key to their effectiveness.

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 21, 2013 12:50 PM

And so the discussion continues. Jonathan Gottschall writes his second blog post in his series about why/how storytelling works so well for businesses (and in general).


He does a good job in laying that foundation.


I have two thoughts for readers as they check out this post:


1. Gottschalk talks about story structure. Of course you have to know story structures to craft a good story. But structure alone won't make you successful IMHO. There's a whole lot more going on in telling a compelling story and structure is only one piece. Ask any creative writer! There are many different formulas. Most biz folks in the US are completely unaware that different groups/cultures have different story structures than what we see broadcasted on the Internet. Which in a global marketplace has huge significance! I'm not anti-story structure -- I just want us to understand its role better.


2. Stories and manipulation. Yes we are being influenced by stories -- and have always been. Yes we are being manipulated all the time. Yes, at some level we know this. No, access to information via the Internet and social media does not innoculate against this. Which is one reason why consumers are getting much more savvy about purchasing from companies who are socially and environmentally conscious.


Gottschalk focuses mostly on ads in this post. Ads are only one type of business storytelling however. He asks questions at the end, "Is storytelling really locked into a master formula?" No. 


Another question he asks is, "Hasn't the digital revolution paved the way for a new kind of storytelling?" and "Is it time for story 2.0?" LOL -- both remain to be seen and I look forward to the next post!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

John Michel's curator insight, October 22, 2013 5:36 AM

 When we enter into a story, we enter into an altered mental state--a state of high suggestibility.

Charlie Dare's curator insight, October 22, 2013 7:55 PM

Many songs in particular Country or blues ballards tell a story often of love lost like "Me and Bobby Magee "..."

And so the discussion continues. Jonathan Gottschall writes his second blog post in his series about why/how storytelling works so well for businesses (and in general).

 

He does a good job in laying that foundation.

 

I have two thoughts for readers as they check out this post:

 

1. Gottschalk talks about story structure. Of course you have to know story structures to craft a good story. But structure alone won't make you successful IMHO. There's a whole lot more going on in telling a compelling story and structure is only one piece. Ask any creative writer! There are many different formulas. Most biz folks in the US are completely unaware that different groups/cultures have different story structures than what we see broadcasted on the Internet. Which in a global marketplace has huge significance! I'm not anti-story structure -- I just want us to understand its role better.

 

2. Stories and manipulation. Yes we are being influenced by stories -- and have always been. Yes we are being manipulated all the time. Yes, at some level we know this. No, access to information via the Internet and social media does not innoculate against this. Which is one reason why consumers are getting much more savvy about purchasing from companies who are socially and environmentally conscious.

 

Gottschalk focuses mostly on ads in this post. Ads are only one type of business storytelling however. He asks questions at the end, "Is storytelling really locked into a master formula?" No. 

 

Another question he asks is, "Hasn't the digital revolution paved the way for a new kind of storytelling?" and "Is it time for story 2.0?" LOL -- both remain to be seen and I look forward to the next post!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling"

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Storytelling, Neuroscience, And The Future

Storytelling, Neuroscience, And The Future | immersive media | Scoop.it
Our collective story is what makes sense of what we perceive.

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, July 25, 2016 1:51 PM

There is a lot out there on the neuroscience of storytelling. Here's another terrific article that share more about the topic. What I particularly like is the author's discussion of the future of storytelling based on our current addiction to screen time, and some of the opportunities virtual reality storytelling bring.

 

It's an interesting read. What do you think of the narrative future proposed?

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

Insight Narrator's curator insight, August 29, 2016 4:54 AM

There is a lot out there on the neuroscience of storytelling. Here's another terrific article that share more about the topic. What I particularly like is the author's discussion of the future of storytelling based on our current addiction to screen time, and some of the opportunities virtual reality storytelling bring.

 

It's an interesting read. What do you think of the narrative future proposed?

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

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Perception, Storytelling, & The Network Effect

Perception, Storytelling, & The Network Effect | immersive media | Scoop.it

Neuroscientist Beau Lotto shares with us how perception shapes our world  and storytelling, and artist Jonathan Harris shares with us the impact of our online lives to both. Both give us steps to take.


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Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 6, 2015 3:28 PM

Here's a brand new blog post from moi, sharing artist Jonathan Harris' story about his latest project The Network Effect. He has some fascinating things to say about the impact of our online lives to our perception of the world, and the stories we tell.


Go read his letter (it's provocative), along with my brief comments. I'm off to unplug and play :)


BTW -- the photo above is one of my original hand-dyed silk pieces hot off the studio table. It's titled "World Stories". Look for an announcement soon about my storied greeting cards.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it @kdietz

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Going On A Digital Detox: The Ability To Create A New Story

Going On A Digital Detox: The Ability To Create A New Story | immersive media | Scoop.it
Neuroscientists observed 35 people who were totally cut off from their devices in the Moroccan desert. The results were life-changing.

Via Karen Dietz
Melanie Hundley's insight:

Good golly -- why would I curate an article on this topic??!!


Because a digital detox will improve your storytelling skills. As the article points out, not only will your storytelling get better, so will your relationships, and the ability to be more empathetic. Even more important, you'll get out of a rut and it will allow you to craft a different life story. On top of that, your brain will change for the better. Whoa!


A fascinating research project is shared, along with additional results than what I've already mentioned. I try to keep weekends free of digital devices. I like how much more relaxed I am, engaged in the world, and happier.


Go read this interesting article and start planning your times to unplug. 


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her business storytelling curation at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;

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Angela Jotic's curator insight, August 4, 2015 3:13 AM

Good golly -- why would I curate an article on this topic??!!


Because a digital detox will improve your storytelling skills. As the article points out, not only will your storytelling get better, so will your relationships, and the ability to be more empathetic. Even more important, you'll get out of a rut and it will allow you to craft a different life story. On top of that, your brain will change for the better. Whoa!


A fascinating research project is shared, along with additional results than what I've already mentioned. I try to keep weekends free of digital devices. I like how much more relaxed I am, engaged in the world, and happier.


Go read this interesting article and start planning your times to unplug. 


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her business storytelling curation at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Cathryn Wellner's curator insight, August 4, 2015 5:32 PM

Good golly -- why would I curate an article on this topic??!!

 

Because a digital detox will improve your storytelling skills. As the article points out, not only will your storytelling get better, so will your relationships, and the ability to be more empathetic. Even more important, you'll get out of a rut and it will allow you to craft a different life story. On top of that, your brain will change for the better. Whoa!

 

A fascinating research project is shared, along with additional results than what I've already mentioned. I try to keep weekends free of digital devices. I like how much more relaxed I am, engaged in the world, and happier.

 

Go read this interesting article and start planning your times to unplug. 

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her business storytelling curation at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;

Christina Roney's curator insight, August 5, 2015 11:02 AM

Good golly -- why would I curate an article on this topic??!!

 

Because a digital detox will improve your storytelling skills. As the article points out, not only will your storytelling get better, so will your relationships, and the ability to be more empathetic. Even more important, you'll get out of a rut and it will allow you to craft a different life story. On top of that, your brain will change for the better. Whoa!


A fascinating research project is shared, along with additional results than what I've already mentioned. I try to keep weekends free of digital devices. I like how much more relaxed I am, engaged in the world, and happier.


Go read this interesting article and start planning your times to unplug. 


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her business storytelling curation at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;

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Neuroscience Study Identifies "Story Button" & What it Says About Brand/Human Love

Neuroscience Study Identifies "Story Button" & What it Says About Brand/Human Love | immersive media | Scoop.it
Move over focus groups. Neuroscience-based research from Innocean seeks to uncover what people really like and seemingly reveals that, sometimes...

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, March 13, 2014 12:48 PM

Hmmmmm -- here's some new research from neuroscience. The company Innocean wired up 8 people to measure their responses, asked them questions about brands, and then about people they love.


Guess what -- 3 of the 8 people showed more love for brands than people. Why? The brands had a stronger story attached to them. What does it mean? Their interpretation is that there is a story button in our brain.


OK -- hold on here. I've got some problems with this. I'm not a neuroscientist but some of this seems like a lot of over-reaching.


First of all -- 8 people is a very tiny sample. That 3 of the 8 had a certain experience does not mean much at all.  All the study points to is more questions. Like for the 3 people who loved their brands more than loved ones, are their relationships troubled? If so, that would naturally lead to mythologizing a watch. And is a watch a brand or simply an object evoking strong memories? Is the love for the Seattle Seahawks more about someone mythologizing their identity? And does that reflect at all on this person's love for his toddler? Ay yi yi -- I could go on.


And then to conclude there's a "story button" in the brain that is more like a switch to turn on and off is problematic for me also. We think in stories so narrative structure is much more imbedded in who we are than a pus button indicates.


So I remain highly skeptical about this study until A LOT more research is done. Read the article and tell me what you think.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Ivan Mercado Lorberg's curator insight, March 14, 2014 11:34 AM

¿Es posible "amar" o comprometerse con una marca en particular en un mundo tan poligámico como el de hoy enn día? Acá una respuesta Neurocientífica

Mervi Rauhala's curator insight, March 18, 2014 3:38 AM

Interesting study about how people "love "their favorite brands and icons even more than people. But there has to be a special story related to the product or brand, but but...The results could be also interpreted otherwise. Leaves lot of open questions.