immersive media
Follow
Find tag "change"
838 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Melanie Hundley from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

Storytelling: The Foundation For Change

Storytelling: The Foundation For Change | immersive media | Scoop.it
Personal change is difficult and rare. These 3 strategies help us change even the most intractable habits.

Via Karen Dietz
more...
Karen Dietz's curator insight, February 10, 10:48 AM

Article LInk: http://www.forbes.com/sites/kathycaprino/2015/02/06/the-3-most-powerful-ways-to-change-people-who-dont-want-to-change/3/


The original title of this article by Kathy Caprino for Forbes Magazine is "The 3 Most Powerful Ways To Change People Who Don't Want To Change". You'd never know that storytelling is the bedrock for all change.


Caprino is interviewing David Maxwell, one of the authors of a favorite book of mine, Influencer. Before social, personal, or structural can be leveraged to make a change, the dominating story needs to be dealt with first. Tips for how to do so are shared.


Go read the article. It makes tons of sense. Want change? Story it first.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at http://www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Rescooped by Melanie Hundley from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

Data Storytelling: How To Make A Big Difference

Data Storytelling: How To Make A Big Difference | immersive media | Scoop.it
Many people will be familiar with signs by the side of the road exhorting drivers to take their litter away with them. In the past, those signs would remind transgressors of the penalties they faced if caught. Nowadays, they are more likely to feature a statement along the lines of [...]

Via Karen Dietz
more...
Karen Dietz's curator insight, September 3, 2014 1:29 PM

As I continue to help clients and students integrate data into stories and presentations, I'm finding great truth in the ideas presented in this article.


This post focuses on a specific category of information that when shared can move mountains. The information simply conveys what "other people do."


If you need to influence people in any way, take the advice in this article to heart. The author writes about how to share "what other people do" and gives fab examples to back it up.


Enjoy reading this piece and adding these tips into your data storytelling toolkit.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Rescooped by Melanie Hundley from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

What's The Problem With TED Storytelling?

What's The Problem With TED Storytelling? | immersive media | Scoop.it
TED is changing the public discourse -- and not all for the better.

Via Karen Dietz
more...
Karen Dietz's curator insight, July 14, 2014 3:24 PM

Here's an article that makes us question how TED talks have been shaping our business storytelling -- and maybe not in such a good way.


As the author, Nick Morgan, states -- and I agree with him -- TED talks are fabulous. We love TED. TED talks have definitely impacted business presentations for the better.


Yet Morgan makes 2 very important points regarding public speaking and business storytelling:

  1. Shorter personal speeches. What's wrong with that?? Well, as Morgan says, "What’s wrong with shorter speeches is that you can't persuade people to change in 15 minutes, because you can't make them emotionally uncomfortable enough with the status quo to be ready to embrace something new." He continues with some relevant stats.
  2. A story about your personal revelation might not apply to the goal of the speech. There are all kinds of stories to tell, but TED talks seem to tell us that the stories we should share need to be about a personal revelation we've had.


My take-aways from reading this article and the additional insights Morgan has?

  1. If you want people to change, stories need to be longer. Or presentations need to be longer with several different types of stories told.
  2. A springboard story (short anecdote) may get people started, but other story sharing is needed to sustain the effort.
  3. Personal revelation stories might not be the point -- share stories that are not about you.


There's good common sense wisdom in this article that makes us think twice about effective business storytelling. It is definitely worth the read.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Rescooped by Melanie Hundley from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

Latest Research On Effecitve Biz Story Endings

Latest Research On Effecitve Biz Story Endings | immersive media | Scoop.it
Just another WordPress site

Via Karen Dietz
more...
Karen Dietz's curator insight, January 7, 2014 3:01 PM

Kendall Haven, author of Story Proof: The Science Behind the Startling Power of Story recently wrote me about his latest research on business story endings.


It's way cool stuff. Bottom line: positive characters and positive endings are not as effective as we thought when desiring to shift behaviors.


Read the brief conversation between myself and Kendall, and then use the latest information to start crafting stories that will act as catalysts for change.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Rescooped by Melanie Hundley from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

Why MLK Did NOT Say, "I Have A Plan"--Power of Future Story

Why MLK Did NOT Say, "I Have A Plan"--Power of Future Story | immersive media | Scoop.it
When Martin Luther King, Jr. stood on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial fifty years ago and spoke to a great people about their greater future, he didn’t say, “I have a plan.”

Via Karen Dietz
more...
romduck's curator insight, August 28, 2013 8:28 AM

Sharing the VISION means sharing the POINT!

Kati Sipp's curator insight, August 29, 2013 8:29 PM

an excellent point. 

Karen Dietz's comment, August 29, 2013 9:44 PM
So true romduck! And thanks for your comments Jean-Philippee and Kati.
Rescooped by Melanie Hundley from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

Stories: What Sinks Organizational Change Infographic

Stories: What Sinks Organizational Change Infographic | immersive media | Scoop.it

Some aspects of organizational culture are visible on the surface, like the tip of an iceberg, while others are implicit and submerged within the organization. Because these ingrained assumptions are tacit and below the surface, they are not easy to see or deal with, although they affect everything the organization does.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor, Karen Dietz
more...
AnnC's curator insight, February 15, 7:19 PM

We need to discover the hidden variables that affect the change process in order to fully understand the task before us.

Roselyne Lecuyer's curator insight, February 16, 6:01 AM

Interesting iceberg representation of organisation culture

Expressworks International's curator insight, March 16, 5:26 PM

At an industry conference this week attendees agreed that one of the issues that concerns them most is culture. This is not a surprising outcome since the industry has seen the entrance of many other competitors and a disruption to business as usual. 

 

Using the iceberg model we can illustrate why complex change like cultural transformation is so difficult. There is widespread knowledge that this kind of endeavor takes time and a lot of resources.  Why?  Because the heavier lifting needs to be done “below water” to ensure that there is complete understanding of impacts/challenges that the new normal poses to shared assumptions, perceptions, values, beliefs, traditions and feelings. Then plans must be created and implemented to support the learning and adjustment required for the new norms, traditions and procedures that come with transformation. This is not a quick program because under water is where we deal with the emotional and sometimes “messy” side of an organization. A good change program anticipates and prepares for the journey of transformation using the whole iceberg.  Leveraging a good change partner is a common strategy that allows the organization to focus on the “above water” activities while the partner helps with the “under water” challenges.

 

If you’re thinking about culture change, know what you’re getting into and that there are no short cuts. However, if you’re dealing with disruption in your industry, and a strategy of improvements is no longer good enough, you may well want to ask yourself, “Can I afford not to undertake culture change to meet my business goals?”

Rescooped by Melanie Hundley from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

“Talk the Walk”: A Game Changer The Best Storied Leaders Do

“Talk the Walk”: A Game Changer The Best Storied Leaders Do | immersive media | Scoop.it
Why words matter.

Via Karen Dietz
more...
Karen Dietz's curator insight, August 21, 2014 6:01 PM

I like this article because it goes beyond the simple leadership phrase "Walk the talk," which means "live your values, don't just talk about them".


What the author Bill Taylor is focusing on here is the connection between thinking, language, communication, and action. His position is that when leaders start thinking differently, their language changes, then their communication changes, and then if all goes well, their words and actions line up.


In other words, if leaders can break out of the "isms" of their company, they will start thinking differently about the organization and talk about it differently, too. That can be a game-changer for everyone. Want more innovation? Then start thinking about it differently. That starts the cascade to language, communication, and action.


Taylor has good examples to share, and then asks: "So ask yourself, as you try to lead an organization, or a business unit, or a department: Have you developed a vocabulary of competition that helps everyone understand what makes your company or team special and what it takes for them to be at their best? Can you explain, in a language all your own, what separates you from the pack and why you expect to win?"


All of this languaging and communication happens best through storytelling--which then shapes and inspires action of done well.


While this article is all about using shaping and shifting language internally, the next piece of work is making sure it also connects with customers so you don't end up becoming extinct.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Rescooped by Melanie Hundley from iGeneration - 21st Century Education
Scoop.it!

Leading Change in Education | Common Sense School Leadership

Leading Change in Education | Common Sense School Leadership | immersive media | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 26, 2014 12:05 AM

Teams are still top-down structures. Community is messier and more complex, but can involve many more people. When we open up community, we will hear dissenting voices. So forget guiding coalitions and teams and go for messy and complex.

Rescooped by Melanie Hundley from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

The Science Behind Why Great Stories Spread

The Science Behind Why Great Stories Spread | immersive media | Scoop.it
In the second of a two-part series Jonathan Gottschall discusses the unique power stories have to change minds and the key to their effectiveness.

Via Karen Dietz
more...
Linda Alexander's curator insight, October 21, 2013 8:13 PM

This is important data for teachers to understand in terms of embedded learning and understanding.  

John Michel's curator insight, October 22, 2013 5:36 AM

 When we enter into a story, we enter into an altered mental state--a state of high suggestibility.

Charlie Dare's curator insight, October 22, 2013 7:55 PM

Many songs in particular Country or blues ballards tell a story often of love lost like "Me and Bobby Magee "..."

And so the discussion continues. Jonathan Gottschall writes his second blog post in his series about why/how storytelling works so well for businesses (and in general).

 

He does a good job in laying that foundation.

 

I have two thoughts for readers as they check out this post:

 

1. Gottschalk talks about story structure. Of course you have to know story structures to craft a good story. But structure alone won't make you successful IMHO. There's a whole lot more going on in telling a compelling story and structure is only one piece. Ask any creative writer! There are many different formulas. Most biz folks in the US are completely unaware that different groups/cultures have different story structures than what we see broadcasted on the Internet. Which in a global marketplace has huge significance! I'm not anti-story structure -- I just want us to understand its role better.

 

2. Stories and manipulation. Yes we are being influenced by stories -- and have always been. Yes we are being manipulated all the time. Yes, at some level we know this. No, access to information via the Internet and social media does not innoculate against this. Which is one reason why consumers are getting much more savvy about purchasing from companies who are socially and environmentally conscious.

 

Gottschalk focuses mostly on ads in this post. Ads are only one type of business storytelling however. He asks questions at the end, "Is storytelling really locked into a master formula?" No. 

 

Another question he asks is, "Hasn't the digital revolution paved the way for a new kind of storytelling?" and "Is it time for story 2.0?" LOL -- both remain to be seen and I look forward to the next post!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling"