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Rescooped by Melanie Hundley from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
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The ‘Star Wars Holiday Special’: It’s really that bad

The ‘Star Wars Holiday Special’: It’s really that bad | immersive media | Scoop.it

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, December 28, 2015 2:09 PM


Danielle Zimmerman:  "This special may be terrible, but you should still watch it. (After all, it’s all technically canon!) Sure, the long holiday season may be finally coming to a close, but there’s no such thing as the best time to watch this holiday special. So, why not watch it now?"

Rescooped by Melanie Hundley from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
Scoop.it!

How the Doctor Puppet Saved Christmas


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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, December 26, 2012 1:31 AM

For Dr Who fans everywhere ....

Rescooped by Melanie Hundley from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
Scoop.it!

Rear Window at Christmas: behind Google's new interactive animated short

Rear Window at Christmas: behind Google's new interactive animated short | immersive media | Scoop.it

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, December 24, 2015 1:34 PM


Adi Robertson:  "The scene is a snowy apartment building out of the 1950s, rendered in a bright, slightly retro palette. A janitor trudges across the courtyard, then stops, wary. Someone is out there. Someone large, nimble, and wearing a floppy red hat. Then you turn your phone."

Vivalist's curator insight, December 25, 2015 4:53 PM

"Aardman’s animation, though, had to look good from several different possible camera angles. It couldn’t be linear, and it had to progress at the viewer’s pace. In Special Delivery, some vignettes only begin when you look closely at them, and major story events will wait until you’re paying attention. Instead of a screen, the team had to imagine something more like a stage. They even built a circular cardboard "set" as a storyboard, blocking out the movement of their characters in physical space. 

"You’re giving away the camera to the audience, which is a bit nerve-wracking," says director Tim Ruffle. "After a while, you kind of get the idea that you’re trying to create an experience for people, rather than creating a show."

That’s a sentiment that’s heard more and more often, from directors exploring the nascent field of virtual reality video."


The article mentions the VR limitations and its differences with 360° casual immersion. It also meditates on the line being blurred between motion pictures and video game.


UPDATE: another article on the topic

http://www.marketingmagazine.co.uk/article/1391491/wallace-gromits-makers-virtual-reality-reshaping-storytelling