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Rescooped by Calvin Henton from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
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What’s Your Brand Worth?

What’s Your Brand Worth? | IMC | Scoop.it

CEOs and executives have understood for a long time that a company’s brand is important and goes way beyond just a logo and tagline. But questions about the actual value of the brand have often relegated this vital asset to a fuzzy, feel-good, slightly nebulous item that rarely gets the executive attention it deserves.


It turns out that companies can determine how much a brand is worth. We’ve seen this most recently in the bidding war breaking out for Steinway, which is a brand that transcends time and technology. It has legendary cache, in a way that fabled brands like Kodak or Polaroid did not. We know that strong brands with good reputations have 31% better total return to shareholders than the MSCI World average....


Via Jeff Domansky
Calvin Henton's insight:

I think getting a good brand to your name/company is so important. I think that this is really the only true difference between your coffee shop and the coffee shop around the corner or that soap over this soap. The coffee may be exactly the same and the cafe have the exact same menu, however the brand is what will bring the consumer in and keep them coming back. Just like Starbucks, in my opinion the coffee it self is actually pretty rubbish same goes for the food (also over priced) compered with most cafes in auckland there are hundreds of nice and better options, yet I will still go there over the next door cafe purely because of the brand.

 I also think this is where it is going to become a lot harder for companies and products to create this brand when they have to rely solely on digital media to do so. As I beleve the strongest brands are formed thru a tactile encounter with the product by actually going into the shop or business and experiencing it for your self. This becomes much harder when it is only on a screen with a million other distraction as well as sitting anywhere doing so in a very uncontrolled environment. 
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, August 20, 2013 4:42 PM
Great look at the value of brand and reputation.
Nicole Jones de Rooy's comment, August 21, 2013 6:12 AM
Thanks for your insight - interestingly I have just asked scoopit folk about why there can be scoopit pages with the same name. Are we not in a sense branding our name with the content that we curate. Would be good to hear other opinions on this.
Alexandra Sinclair's comment, August 21, 2013 7:43 PM
Stop going to Starbucks Calvin... have you seen the stains on the couches???

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Rescooped by Calvin Henton from Consumer behavior
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Surprising Facts on Consumer Shopping and Purchase ... Mobile!

Surprising Facts on Consumer Shopping and Purchase ... Mobile! | IMC | Scoop.it
JiWire Uncovers Surprising Facts on Consumer Shopping and Purchase ...

Via Francisco Teixeira
Calvin Henton's insight:

I found all of the facts and figures in this article actually really interesting. I did already know that smart phone plays a big role in on line shopping, however I did not know how mush people used there smart phones so much whiles in the actual store. This now means that retail store are going to have to be increasingly careful of how they are marketing on line and in stores as customers are now able to research every pice and compeer where ever they are.

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Rescooped by Calvin Henton from Integrated Brand Communications
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Infographic: What do customers dislike most about your brand’s social media? | SMI

Infographic: What do customers dislike most about your brand’s social media? | SMI | IMC | Scoop.it

There's a good reason why Facebook doesn't have a 'dislike' button yet. Actually, as this infographic shows, there are several good reasons!

 

 

Bad spelling, salesy updates, overly-frequent posts and trying too hard to be funny. These are the main problems social media users have with brands’ social media presences. Of course, the severity of the gripe depends on a number of factors, such as age, gender, but as this infographic from Disruptive Communications shows, poor spelling and grammar in updates is the biggest turn-off, so make sure you hit spellcheck before you hit post!

 

 


Via Russ Merz, Ph.D.
Calvin Henton's insight:

I found this article interesting as this not something I have seen much real research done on. Once again I think a lot of brands understand the importance of having social media as part of there marketing strategy however I don't that they are giving it enough precedence or time and are thus doing the exact opposite. As will many of the brands and companies that I follow on social media they all do exactly true same, other its bad spelling or post every flipping hr or really bad cheesy posts or comments. However I do still think there is a place for this kind thing, however this needs to be part of a plane strategy. For instance if they are aiming at the 18-24 year old marten thank a more relaxed approach on spelling my not be the worst idea. On the contrary I didn't believe that there is ever a situation for bad humour or sleazy posts as theres are the types of things consumers take very personally. Also ona side note, I am realy impressed with the way they have presented this information and they way in witch they have designed the graphs.

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Jaklin Issaeva's comment, August 15, 2013 5:01 AM
I agree Maggie, social media is expanding more and more through the marketing industry as a way to target consumers. It is important for Marketers to target their target group simultaneously and accordingly because each segment is different in wants and needs, using your example of females needing more frequent updates whilst using correct English rather than being salesy.
Hendy Han's comment, August 15, 2013 5:40 AM
Interesting Article to see another point of view of Social Media Hypes. Most marketers may overlook the proper way to use Social Media and took it to lightly because it may seems "easy".
Manasi Ambavane's comment, August 16, 2013 11:23 AM
Hey Maggie you picked up interesting articles and with colorful graph, how this article talks about targeting males and females to build customer loyalty through social media. If company is doing all of the above right by targeting right customers, yet neglect to provide useful content for your customers, chances are they will lose credibility on the short-term. Every news update a company posts should have some sort of value for your customer. Of course, notifying the audience of your current campaigns can be somewhat interesting, but customers will want to know what’s in it for them. Even as u said language is really important to convey the right message to the audience.
Rescooped by Calvin Henton from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

What’s Your Brand Worth?

What’s Your Brand Worth? | IMC | Scoop.it

CEOs and executives have understood for a long time that a company’s brand is important and goes way beyond just a logo and tagline. But questions about the actual value of the brand have often relegated this vital asset to a fuzzy, feel-good, slightly nebulous item that rarely gets the executive attention it deserves.


It turns out that companies can determine how much a brand is worth. We’ve seen this most recently in the bidding war breaking out for Steinway, which is a brand that transcends time and technology. It has legendary cache, in a way that fabled brands like Kodak or Polaroid did not. We know that strong brands with good reputations have 31% better total return to shareholders than the MSCI World average....


Via Jeff Domansky
Calvin Henton's insight:

I think getting a good brand to your name/company is so important. I think that this is really the only true difference between your coffee shop and the coffee shop around the corner or that soap over this soap. The coffee may be exactly the same and the cafe have the exact same menu, however the brand is what will bring the consumer in and keep them coming back. Just like Starbucks, in my opinion the coffee it self is actually pretty rubbish same goes for the food (also over priced) compered with most cafes in auckland there are hundreds of nice and better options, yet I will still go there over the next door cafe purely because of the brand.

 I also think this is where it is going to become a lot harder for companies and products to create this brand when they have to rely solely on digital media to do so. As I beleve the strongest brands are formed thru a tactile encounter with the product by actually going into the shop or business and experiencing it for your self. This becomes much harder when it is only on a screen with a million other distraction as well as sitting anywhere doing so in a very uncontrolled environment. 
more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, August 20, 2013 4:42 PM
Great look at the value of brand and reputation.
Nicole Jones de Rooy's comment, August 21, 2013 6:12 AM
Thanks for your insight - interestingly I have just asked scoopit folk about why there can be scoopit pages with the same name. Are we not in a sense branding our name with the content that we curate. Would be good to hear other opinions on this.
Alexandra Sinclair's comment, August 21, 2013 7:43 PM
Stop going to Starbucks Calvin... have you seen the stains on the couches???
Rescooped by Calvin Henton from Content Strategy |Brand Development |Organic SEO
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Innovation - The Key To Growing Your Business

Innovation - The Key To Growing Your Business | IMC | Scoop.it
The secret to business growth is never to become complacent with the status quo. Your goal should never be to maintain your current state of affairs, even if that state is quite good - instead, your focus should constantly be on expansion.

Via Level343
Calvin Henton's insight:

I found this article to be quite interesting not just from a big business point of view but general perspective. One of the suggestions that I thought had a really great point was the 'Have a Filter for the Best Ideas' were he is saying that yes people defiantly need to listen to there customers however they can not take on all of there ideas or give them every thing they want because they do not always have great ideas. I think that this is defiantly something that a lot of businesses will have issues with, even like the local cafe, where they are trying so hard to please the customer that they forget why the customer really likes them in the first place and they start to become something that they didn't want to be

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Level343's curator insight, June 28, 2013 3:23 PM

Have a filter for the best ideas
While listening to customers is important, Entrepreneur Magazine notes that you can’t give them everythingthey’re asking for. If you do too much to be a people-pleaser, you’ll spend all your time catering to customers’ demands, and sometimes their ideas will be bad ones. Learn to separate constructive criticism from just plain criticism. Find the customer suggestions that work the best for your business, and follow through on them. As for the rest, learn to say no.

Rescooped by Calvin Henton from MarketingHits
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Social Influence - Do You Have Any? - Social Media and Marketing by Bogdan Fiedur

Social Influence - Do You Have Any? - Social Media and Marketing by Bogdan Fiedur | IMC | Scoop.it
As an affiliate marketer, it is important to understand many metrics, but with social media, judging your social influence takes on a whole new meaning.

Via Diane Bjorling, Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
Calvin Henton's insight:

I like this article because i personally have not seen many like this, and so straight to the point. I think what Bjorling is saying is very true and not enough people have knowledge of this. I see a lot of businesses and products on social media who have literally just tagged along with every one els and joined the bandwagon as they feel they have to however that is not always the case, and then when they do there main gold is just toy gain as many likes or follower as possible sand not really take into consideration who there market really is and who they are targeting with this style of marketing. Assn well as what kind if brand image is this creating for us.

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Diane Bjorling's curator insight, August 21, 2013 12:23 AM

Social influence is not about vanity, not when used properly.  Understanding your social influence can help you with your directions in how you want to be percieved, how you are reaching people and give you an edge when it comes to marketing or affiliate marketing

Michael Johnson's curator insight, August 21, 2013 10:58 AM

Some key insights into creating influence and branding in your market via Social Media.

Ron Sela's curator insight, August 26, 2013 3:22 AM

Social Influence - Do You Have Any?