IMC Brand Management
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IMC Brand Management
Brand Management for Integrated Marketing Communications
Curated by Laura Killgour
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Should Pepsi Change its Name?

Should Pepsi Change its Name? | IMC Brand Management | Scoop.it
The soda is what the company is named after, but with just 11% of PepsiCo's earnings before interest and tax coming from its North American drinks business, is it time for a re-brand?

Via Sylvain Leroux
Laura Killgour's insight:

In depth research needs to be undertaken before a name change occurs. In relation to IMC it is understood that consumers gain an emotional attachment towards a brand, especially the name. Even though pepsi will still be called Pepsi and it is just the parent name PepsiCo that will change, the research needs to prove that majority of consumers will be satisfied with the name change. To me personally it makes sense considering Pepsi brings in less than 25%, it is no longer the big earner. But then again the name has been around for a long time, so is the change worth it? 

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Apar Sethi's curator insight, March 20, 2013 10:35 PM

Changing the Brand Name is a big risk for a Multi National Company like Pepsi. Cusromers and Stakeholders connected to this company have built a relaition with the brand Pepsi which had been maintained since several years. Changing the name can cause a huge shift in the effectiveness of Brand Awareness and Recognition they have created since the start. Many parts of the world may not be in a link with social media which may cause a huge loss due to no effective communication between the company and the customers. A good market research and forecast should be practise before taking a big step.

Luke Mariner's comment, March 21, 2013 6:02 AM
I agree, Pepsi changing their name is definitely a risk. It takes time and care in order to build a large, known and favoured brand. It relies on the company behaviour to be remembered differently from competitors and reoccurring purchases (as well as emotions) from consumers to build loyalty. There are also so many used and taken brand names these days, so the question also has to be asked whether it would be a damaging move to change the name and risk the reputation so far. A businesses name and logo reflects that companies values and goals, and if the name changes there is also the risk of losing the emotional commitment from consumers. A well identified and researched strategy would need to be used.
Rohit Bansal's curator insight, September 22, 2014 9:16 PM

Changing the Brand Name is a big risk for a Multi National Company like Pepsi. Cusromers and Stakeholders connected to this company have built a relaition with the brand Pepsi which had been maintained since several years. Changing the name can cause a huge shift in the effectiveness of Brand Awareness and Recognition they have created since the start. Many parts of the world may not be in a link with social media which may cause a huge loss due to no effective communication between the company and the customers.

Rescooped by Laura Killgour from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
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Rebranding Lance Armstrong: Marketing Pros' 6-Step Recovery Plan | The Atlantic

Rebranding Lance Armstrong: Marketing Pros' 6-Step Recovery Plan | The Atlantic | IMC Brand Management | Scoop.it
Through PR, all things are possible. Maybe.

 

Lance Armstrong's career as a public figure, it would seem, is over. After all, he did not one but several of the lowest things you can do in sports (and life, really): He cheated, he lied about cheating, he allegedly harassed and persecuted those who told the truth about his cheating—and worst of all, he became an international hero in the process. Now that the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency has found Armstrong on the wrong end of "conclusive and undeniable proof" of a decade's worth of performance-enhancing drugs, and he's been banned from cycling for life and stripped of his seven cherished Tour de France titles, the public's regard for Armstrong has tumbled from Superman status down to the depths of disappointment and scorn.

 

But if disgraced heroes like Barry Bonds, Mark McGwire, Martha Stewart, and Tiger Woods taught us anything, it's that there's always a way to crawl back into the public's good graces—with the help of some powerful image-rehab magic conjured up by a trained professional, that is.

 

What, if anything, can be done to help rebuild Armstrong's image? Lance Armstrong, after all, isn't just a man. He's a marketable brand, too. Since it launched in 1997, his foundation Livestrong (formerly known as the Lance Armstrong Foundation) has raised more than $470 million for cancer awareness and research. So I asked four professionals in brand management, public relations, and consulting what advice they would give to Armstrong to help salvage what's left of Brand Lance...


Via Jeff Domansky
Laura Killgour's insight:

Brand management is important for any product and when that brand loyalty is ruined it will be hard get that loyalty back. I personally don't believe that Lance Armstrong should be rebranded as such, as he simply cheated and lied, his brand was based on what we thought was a remarkable story of overcoming cancer and then winning 7 Tour de Frances. He has lost the trust and loyalty he once had by many worldwide and to gain this back will be long and difficult. Going to Oprah to do an interview, I believe was a smart move, Oprah is seen as a trustworthy and very credible celebrity, therefore poeple would view her as getting the truth and maybe viewing Lance Armstrong in a different light.

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, January 17, 2013 2:31 PM

Here's some useful crisis PR and branding you should place from the experts to help Lance Armstrong refurbish his reputation... maybe.

Holly Eden's comment, March 13, 2013 4:12 AM
An idea i would like to add is that by communicating to the world through the likes of Oprah, the perception of Lance Armstrong as a brand may entice people to think twice. The use of IMC here is obvious, with direct marketing appealing to people to change their view on the Lance Armstrong brand. A personal example from my own experience of listening to Lance Armstrong on Oprah is that I respected him a bit more after the interview, therefore this shows my perception of the brand had changed.