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Caught Up In The Holocene | posted by "fluxBoston" regarding a MIT exhibit @ List Visual Arts Center

Caught Up In The Holocene | posted by "fluxBoston" regarding a MIT exhibit @ List Visual Arts Center | images in context | Scoop.it

There is nothing wrong with aimlessly wandering through an art gallery. It is actually a favorite pastime of mine. Passively gazing at works enables me to momentarily silence the whirring microprocessor of my mind, escape myself, and even occasionally make room for creative thoughts to drift in.

 

“The exhibition takes its title from Max Frisch’s 1980 novella, Man in the Holocene, in which the narrator gathers selections from encyclopedias and books to preserve knowledge as a deluge threatens to destroy his village. Of particular interest to the narrator is information about our geological present, the Holocene, which includes the development of human civilization. The Holocene is thus our period of geological time, in which we attempt to understand the physical and natural laws that govern the universe and the origins of life, while also coping with the significant extent of our own impact on the Earth’s ecosystems.”

Now that that’s out of the way..

I approached In the Holocene at MIT’s List Visual Arts Center without pretense. I simply came equipped with an open mind and a curiosity as to how such a vast and multi-layered subject would be tackled in a gallery setting.

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The art world we deserve?

The art world we deserve? | images in context | Scoop.it

"The term “art world” was coined in the mid-1960s by Arthur Coleman Danto, the influential American critic and pioneer of art theory who died in October 2013. Unlike the traditional art of representation, which sought to manifest the power and influence of the Church, the aristocracy and the haute bourgeoisie as beautiful, good and true, today’s art world stands for the complex referential system of contemporary art that is only explicable in its economic, sociopolitical, academic and philosophical contexts. Art’s transgressive orientation found its programmatic expression in Joseph Beuys’ notion of an “expanded concept of art”.

Philippe Lejeune's insight:


"Art in today’s society has risen to become a new dominant culture, anchored like sport and showbiz in the system of international companies and the mass media. As creative potential, art and culture are tapped and marketed at every level. But also at issue are desires, longings and personal individuality. The German tabloid newspaper Bild recently reported on the opening of Art Cologne: “Important art, even more important VIPs! Art has become the religion of high society.”

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Centered – La symétrie dans les films de Wes Anderson

Centered – La symétrie dans les films de Wes Anderson | images in context | Scoop.it
"Centered", une étude visuelle sur l'utilisation de la symétrie et l'importance du centrage dans les films de Wes Anderson. Une vidéo réalisée par Kogona
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Two Photographers Emerge from the Shadows with Over 400 Artist Portraits

Two Photographers Emerge from the Shadows with Over 400 Artist Portraits | images in context | Scoop.it
Few people may know the names of Shunk-Kender, but the pair of photographers behind that hyphenated moniker have captured many of the most famous images of post-war modern and contemporary art in P...
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Don't You Understand, I'm an Artist!

Don't You Understand, I'm an Artist! | images in context | Scoop.it
Working alone in a studio can do things to your head.
Philippe Lejeune's insight:

By the way I am an artist, and I gave up having a studio 20 years ago, to be able to survive ( limit my expenses) as an artist. To try to "save myself"!!!! I want to transform the world as well.  

It taught me to work in situ.

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Petzel Gallery - Daniel Buren

Petzel Gallery - Daniel Buren | images in context | Scoop.it

Throughout his almost 50-year-long career, Daniel Buren is best known for his use of contrasting stripes as a visual tool that reveals the specific features and dimensions of a site, often transforming the environment for which it was specifically designed. He alters the perception and context of one’s surroundings by modifying the navigation of space, enhancing lighting, obstructing viewpoints, and highlighting certain architectural features. Buren installs his work—much of which is temporary—in the architecture of both public and private spaces ranging from subway platforms to prestigious museums.
Work in situ- “denotes a work made for a particular site, for a particular time and exhibited in this particular site, and therefore not transportable to another place.” Buren has also identified himself as an artist who “lives and works in situ."
Situated work- “a work for the most part inspired by a particular location, but made with the intention that the very same elements of the original work can be reinstalled in different sites following a series of rules, changing each time in response to the given place. In turn, the site is changed by the work.”

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Hanging Tree Art by Giuseppe Licari

Hanging Tree Art by Giuseppe Licari | images in context | Scoop.it

Sicilian artist Guiseppe Licari has done the unthinkable. What you see are tree trunks emerging from the ceiling of a gallery space. The idea of “Humus” was to symbiotically combine the growth of trees and lighting to create foreign, organic chandeliers. The work articulates a world where visitors are able to get an exclusive peek at a hidden world beneath a park or forest.

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This is not an illusion ~ 2013 is here!

This is not an illusion ~  2013 is here! | images in context | Scoop.it
Philippe Lejeune's insight:

Something is brewing!

My resolution for 2013...  Contrary to what Magritte said, it's not the images that betray us, it's us playing to be deceived by them... I will continue bringing "forms of reality" that challenge our sense of perception. To be fooled or not to be fooled, that is the question.

"It is the spectator, and not life, that art really mirrors."

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Caught Up In The Holocene | posted by "fluxBoston" regarding a MIT exhibit @ List Visual Arts Center

Caught Up In The Holocene | posted by "fluxBoston" regarding a MIT exhibit @ List Visual Arts Center | images in context | Scoop.it

There is nothing wrong with aimlessly wandering through an art gallery. It is actually a favorite pastime of mine. Passively gazing at works enables me to momentarily silence the whirring microprocessor of my mind, escape myself, and even occasionally make room for creative thoughts to drift in.

 

“The exhibition takes its title from Max Frisch’s 1980 novella, Man in the Holocene, in which the narrator gathers selections from encyclopedias and books to preserve knowledge as a deluge threatens to destroy his village. Of particular interest to the narrator is information about our geological present, the Holocene, which includes the development of human civilization. The Holocene is thus our period of geological time, in which we attempt to understand the physical and natural laws that govern the universe and the origins of life, while also coping with the significant extent of our own impact on the Earth’s ecosystems.”

Now that that’s out of the way..

I approached In the Holocene at MIT’s List Visual Arts Center without pretense. I simply came equipped with an open mind and a curiosity as to how such a vast and multi-layered subject would be tackled in a gallery setting.

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Esther Stocker, Artist – Sight Unseen

Esther Stocker, Artist – Sight Unseen | images in context | Scoop.it

 

Cardboardmusicboxes by Nic: "My installations are usually made from very simple materials like painted wood, masking tape, or cardboard. I like that when you get close, it looks simple or like something you could do yourself, but when you step back it looks like fiction, like it could be floating in space even if it's just mounted to the wall. It's all a bit banal, but at the same time it's magic."

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Confessions of a Contemporary Artist; "I hate most Contemporary Art"

Confessions of a Contemporary Artist; "I hate most Contemporary Art" | images in context | Scoop.it

How much from all what we see or experience, we actually like? Actually very little... Art( as symbols) is supposed to re-create a feeling of connection between things, but the reality is that it happens very rarely, and too often just do the opposite -- make you feel disconnected. We end up disengaging or just passing by...

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R. E. H. GORDON lecture: "Extremely Precise Objects of Ambiguous Use"

R. E. H. GORDON lecture: "Extremely Precise Objects of Ambiguous Use" | images in context | Scoop.it

Freedom, in this estimation, need not be the opposite of discipline. Freedom may be simply this: the creation of our own systems of belief, methods for transforming ourselves, modes of perception, disciplines for living, and collective rituals.
Foucault, during this same period, also came to discuss philosophy, and the work of the philosopher, as a parallel type of practice of self-transformation. He came to see work as a way not simply of communicating our ideas to the world, but of challenging our own positions and changing our thinking. And in this way, Foucault identifies the work of the philosopher with that of the artist, in which the process of doing our work has the capacity to change us, artistic practices that are not just communicative but self-transformative. In the same 1983 interview with which I opened this lecture, Riggins posed the question to Foucault: “Is there a special kinship between your kind of philosophy and the arts in general?” Foucault answers:
“Well, I think I am not in a position to answer. You see, I hate to say it, but it’s true that I am not a really good academic. For me intellectual work is related to what you could call aestheticism, meaning transforming yourself...I am not interested in the academic status of what I am doing because my problem is my own transformation. That’s the reason why, when people say ‘Well, you thought this a few years ago and now you say something else,’ my answer is, [Laughter] ‘Well, do you think I have worked like that all those years to say the same thing and not be changed?’ This transformation of one’s self by one’s own knowledge is, I think, something rather close to the aesthetic experience. Why should a painter work if he is not transformed by his own painting?”

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Le cube ~ FIGMENT Boston 2012

The glass project proposes installations that are staged
to deceive the viewer's mind in order to bring back
the playfulness that is hidden in us.

 

Le cube can juxtapose the real with the virtual
which brings confusion of the genres!
True theatricality of the moment.

Fragility of being in the presence of our image,
in the presence of our absence . . .

Free & Unique Expressions are the only answer. . .

 

The "glass project" is a visual concept developed by the artist Philippe Lejeune. A new approach to Images happening in real time that don't reflect one specific point of view. More ephemeral & transcendent images defining "each of us' " position in relation to the socio-cultural context.

 

https://projeqt.com/tiil

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Empire Wildenstein : l’art de la fugue fiscale

Empire Wildenstein :  l’art de la  fugue fiscale | images in context | Scoop.it
Les héritiers de cette dynastie de marchands de tableaux ont utilisé leur collection de maîtres pour des montages opaques. Leur chef de file, Guy, mécène de l’UMP, est rattrapé par le fisc.

 

Impossible de savoir le nombre de toiles de maîtres détenues par cette famille. Des centaines, des milliers, valant plusieurs milliards d’euros - entre trois et dix, selon les estimations.

Le pionnier, Nathan Wildenstein (1851-1934), né en Alsace, était passé du négoce de chevaux à celui des Watteau, puis des Fragonard. Georges (1892-1963) a élargi sa collection à Cézanne, Degas ou Monet. Daniel (1917-2001) a misé sur Bonnard tout en constituant - retour upper class à la case départ - une écurie de chevaux de course. Guy Wildenstein (65 ans, principal héritier depuis le décès de son frère Alec en 2008), collectionne plutôt les procédures judiciaires et fiscales.

Certains tableaux sont parfois prêtés à des musées, sans jamais mentionner leur authentique propriétaire mais sous la sobre mention «collection privée». La plupart ne quittent guère le coffre-fort d’une banque suisse, servant de caution à des montages financiers : ils sont gagés pour emprunter à taux réduit auprès d’une banque, l’argent étant ensuite placé avec un rendement supérieur. Un courrier de 2002 de la banque Coutts (celle de la reine d’Angleterre) aux gestionnaires de fortune de la famille Wildenstein détaille la manœuvre. «La sûreté sera constituée d’une collection d’œuvres d’art d’une valeur estimative pouvant représenter 250 millions de dollars [197 millions d’euros, ndlr], conservée dans l’entrepôt de Zurich. Coutts Bahamas obtiendra une facilité de prêt d’un montant de 100 millions, et investira ces fonds dans le but d’obtenir un rendement suffisant pour payer les intérêts du prêt et générer des flux de trésorerie disponibles.» L’opération est chiffrée : emprunt à 7,4%, placement à 11,2% pour un gain annuel de 3 millions par an. De l’art de se constituer légalement quelque argent de poche tout en dormant.

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Allan Kaprow's Seminal 1966 Essay on Art and "Happenings," Translated into American | VICE United States

Allan Kaprow's Seminal 1966 Essay on Art and "Happenings," Translated into American  | VICE United States | images in context | Scoop.it
Women licking jam off a car? That's a Happening. Buying meat from a butcher? That's a Happening. A bunch of jabronis sitting down doing nothing? That's a Happening.
Philippe Lejeune's insight:

The works Kaprow would do in the following years had a profound effect on art-making in general and later influenced millions of movements. You can blame Kaprow almost entirely for performance art, relational aesthetics, social practice, and net art. He died in 2006 in San Diego after a long career, numerous published works, and a lot of teaching (teaching helps pay the bills when you don’t make objects and are kind of a bitch about documenting ephemeral works).

...

Happenings happened in places where you’d be like, “You’re doing art here?” Examples include apartments, classrooms, or school gyms. Some were in galleries, but always those galleries that nobody had heard of and all the people in the neighborhood saw them and said, “Here comes the gentrification.” Artists moved shit out of the way in the rooms so they could do activities—like Circle Time at preschool, but with more wine. People who came sat down and watched an artist and his/her friends do stuff. What exactly they were watching isn’t easy to describe because lots artists do lots of things, but most of it was bad. Once in a while, artists “broke the fourth wall” and involved the audience in games or whatever. Audience members got out of their chairs, or looked at shit, or stood in groups. A couple of times, artists even moved through the middle of the audience, forcing them to move around also. Wow.

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Anselm Kiefer, Barjac, 2011 - YouTube

Studio visit in Barjac with Anselm Kiefer on April 29th, 2011 Song by Jun Miyake, "The Here and After"

Via Anne Bak
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New Beans - new art and new audiences

New Beans - new art and new audiences | images in context | Scoop.it

I believe that art makes better humans, but that that can only happen when the line from art to audience is as taut, clean and consistent as possible. 

The interplay between artmakers and audience members is central to what we do and vital to the success of the enterprise.  That crackle across the wire, that static in the air at a live event, is good.  It makes your ears hum, your hair stand on end–it’s what connects people in a room behind and in front of the fourth wall. 

As Tom Stoppard famously wrote in Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, about the making of theatre, “We have pledged our identities, secure in the conventions of our trade that someone would be watching.” 

We need to find better ways of understanding, nurturing and reciprocating this, our most fundamental of relationships.  Otherwise I worry we will get to Stoppard’s next line: “And then, gradually, no one was.”

New Beans is about refocusing on the importance of the audience in what we do, putting their value to us and our value to them center stage, and coming up with some new beans to start counting.  It is about getting back to the core of what art means to a society, and trying to understand how and why that meaning has shifted.

Philippe Lejeune's insight:

Artists to often think that the most important thing they do is the physical work --the work itself. Working with a material like glass or reflective surfaces, I learned that the engagement of the viewer with the art was the most important thing to consider... the moment of relation between a form and the viewer conscience is what counts. 

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Allan Kaprow Yard - Art Inventor of the Happening

Allan Kaprow Yard -	 Art Inventor of the Happening | images in context | Scoop.it

Allan Kaprow made his first public happening, Communication in April 1958 on an American university campus. Except that at the time nobody knows what is happening, including Allan Kaprow who do theorize that shortly after, always in spring 1958, in the journalAnthologist, where he published the article: "Something to take place: a happening. " 

Artist and academic Alla Kaprow revisit throughout his career Environments, Actions and Happenings he created. These are read in light of this: "I am interested in this continuity, so it is not a reinvention and reconstruction. Using a metaphor or a material that I remember, I invented new work in relation to the current circumstances. "(Mac Allan Kaprow in Lyon, works entered the collection in 1996 and 1998, 2010 .) 

Today to 40 years of LCdr 40 tonnes of tires are dumped into the nave of the CAPC. Yard and "reinvented". 

Environment cult American artist Allan Kaprow, Yard knows his first intrusion into the courtyard of the Martha Jackson Gallery in New York in 1961, success. 

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An Unusual Warning Greets Visitors to Doug Aitken’s Splashy New Show at 303 Gallery

An Unusual Warning Greets Visitors to Doug Aitken’s Splashy New Show at 303 Gallery | images in context | Scoop.it
ART IN THE AIR - Art News & Gossip
Philippe Lejeune's insight:

It’s hard to miss the giant hole Doug Aitken drilled into 303 Gallery’s floor — hence the recent cement-pouring activity — and filled with a pool of water into which automated faucets drip in choreographed sequences, but just in case the above warning label has helpfully been applied above the desk holding the exhibition press release, checklist, and guestbook.

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Revealing The Truth

Revealing The Truth: Long long time ago a stranger asked me to make his portrait... So I did. I sent him the image and I never heard back from him again since…
Philippe Lejeune's insight:

A portrait of Van Gogh Today?

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Mechanical Walking Space Man's curator insight, February 2, 2013 3:21 AM

A strange sense of self… 

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Livinggallery.info - Contemporary art online

Livinggallery.info - Contemporary art online | images in context | Scoop.it
Laboratory to observe, register and archive current events in art. Ephemeral art, performance art, processual art, interventions, feminist art.

“Eternal Performer” and her/ his position within the context of the contemporary world - Milan Kohout’s reply to Wladyslaw Kazmierczak’s text Performance-education-fiction

Milan Kohout, 2011-12-12

Before we investigate the position of artists within the contemporary world, we should first define what is her/his historical role within society. According to my definition, art is an endless Aristotelian circle (wheel) with three rotating words in it — art is politics is life is art is politics is art.1 Of course the word politics is understood as the derivation of the old Greek word “polis” being the city state, where politics was perceived as community anchored care about the common welfare.

Therefore I have always taught my students not “how to make art” but “how to be artists”.

There are three basic faculties defining art: esthetic, cognitive and ethical. And the latter one is absolutely superior. I have been using the metaphor of “eyes” which see just the surface “esthetic” beauty and “brain” as the cognitive processor of the “cunningness” of the work of art. But above all these the most important is “heart” which is caring ethics —morality —which makes us human.

And it is the artist whom I call “The Eternal Performer” who understands this function of art through the ages.


• The Artist - “The Eternal Performer” working in media of his/her historical period and always the indicator of the presence of any ethical decay within a society.

• The Artist - “The Eternal Performer” who is constantly fighting everlasting stupidity of any people's formations and their social systems.

• The Artist - “The Eternal Performer” who from the outset of tribal times, using the artistic and therefore the most communicable tools, always woke up the given community and warned it about the danger of the power deviation created by some of the members of that community.
Philippe Lejeune's insight:

 

MILAN KOHOUT is a friend, originally from The Czech Republic. Here he got his M.S. IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. He was an independent artist in so-called "Second Culture". Later he becomes a signatory member and art activist of the dissident human rights organization CHARTER 77 (this organization was composed of mostly artists, was nominated for the Nobel Prize in 1985 and initiated non violent Velvet Revolution which toppled totalitarian regime in 1989). Following many interrogations and several imprisonments HE WAS FORCED BY CZ. SECURITY POLICE TO LEAVE HIS COUNTRY in 1986 due to his political art activism.

 

To learn more about his performances: http://www.mobius.org/artist/milan-kohout

 

 

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Culture.fr : Nouvelles expositions au CAPC de Bordeaux

Culture.fr : Nouvelles expositions au CAPC de Bordeaux | images in context | Scoop.it

Du 15 novembre 2012 au 10 février 2013, le CAPC musée d'art contemporain de Bordeaux confie ses espaces à deux artistes à la forte personnalité et dotés chacun à sa manière d'un puissant impact visuel : Jonathan Binet et Michael Krebber, tous deux peintres.

Jonathan Binet, La petite moitié. La présence du corps et des gestes est lisible dans le travail de Jonathan Binet. Chaque toile, chaque ligne, trait, etc. est le résultat d'une préméditation qui génère un parcours truffé d'obstacles, aussi spontané que calculé : l'exposition. Pour Jonathan Binet, le contexte est primordial et l'oeuvre doit s'adapter à l'espace qui devient la condition d'émergence d'une peinture performée.

 

Michael Krebber développe une approche conceptuelle de la peinture en questionnant les racines fondamentales de ce médium, avec et contre les conventions picturales. Sa pratique est empreinte de subversion, d'intransigeance et d'une gestuelle feinte.

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The Impossible Joy of Finding Meaning

The Impossible Joy of Finding Meaning | images in context | Scoop.it
The impossibility and enjoyment of attempting to find meaning of a show with references as diverse as Shakespeare, to the Twilight series, to the cosmos.
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A Brief Survey of Phone Booth Art From Around the World

A Brief Survey of Phone Booth Art From Around the World | images in context | Scoop.it

We’ve been seeing a lot of art in, on, or related to phone booths recently. It makes sense — with cell phones, the structures are on the fast track to being completely obsolete, and being a rather large and awkward, they might as well be used to an artistic end. With that in mind, we’ve put together a brief survey of some of our favorite works of phone booth art from around the world. Some are functional, some are purely artistic, but all of them are interesting odes to an outdated but iconic mode of public communication.


Via Andrea Zeitz
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French Tech Artists Create Beautiful Water-Controlled LED Graffiti Wall | In the Air: Art News & Gossip | ARTINFO.com

French Tech Artists Create Beautiful Water-Controlled LED Graffiti Wall | In the Air: Art News & Gossip | ARTINFO.com | images in context | Scoop.it
ART IN THE AIR - Art News & Gossip...
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Boston art truck launches summer series - The Boston Globe

Boston art truck launches summer series - The Boston Globe | images in context | Scoop.it
A spinoff of the food-truck phenomenon, White Walls Boston looks to bring art to public spaces. The U-Haul made several stops outside Boston last weekend and will host two more shows this summer.

A 26-foot U-Haul carrying what looked like a sparkling black hole made passersby stop to look in wonder last weekend.

The truck was part of a traveling art exhibit called White Walls Boston that visited both predetermined and random locations in Cambridge, Allston, and Jamaica Plain on June 30. It was the first in a three-part series this summer that will showcase projects by local artists.

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