If you lead them,...
Follow
Find
2.0K views | +0 today
If you lead them, they will follow!
Traits today's leaders "must have" to survive and lead without self-destructing
Curated by Robin Martin
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
Scoop.it!

How to Build the 100-Year Company - Michigan Steelcase, Ideas & Endless Innovation

How to Build the 100-Year Company - Michigan Steelcase, Ideas  &  Endless Innovation | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"Steelcase, the long-time maker of innovative workplace furniture, celebrated its 100th anniversary this year, and defines itself not as an office furniture company, rather as a company of ideas."

 

Catch a company that does it right.  Besides IBM and several other rare centarians, Steelcase stands out, in Michigan, in particular.

 

Excerpted:

 

The 100-year company is the rarest of all organizations in Corporate America – a survivor of multiple business cycles, the appearance of radically disruptive technologies and the changing tastes of entirely different generations.

 

In Michigan. Steelcase, doesn't define itself as an office furniture company, but rather, as a company of ideas:

 

______________________________

 

"Companies don't survive for a century, ideas do."

______________________________

 

(Fittingly, Steelcase is a sponsor of the TED Conference). The company, which began by making steel metal wastebaskets back in 1912, thrived during the great post-war Baby Boomer work generation that saw the transition to fixed workplaces and the rise of the modern cubicle worker.

 

Jim Hackett, the CEO of Steelcase, uses a deceptively simple idea to guide the company in this transition to a new mobile economy. He refers to this Big Idea as the movement from the "I/Fixed" paradigm to the "We/Mobile" paradigm.

 

______________________________

 

Steelcase is no longer selling products, it is selling experiences.

______________________________

 

Companies are shifting away from fixed office environments to mobile, collaborative workforces and flexible workspace arrangements that go beyond desks and chairs.

 

One of the company's recently launched product lines is media:scape, which is essentially a blend of furniture and technology to create collaborative workplace environments. At a certain level, Steelcase is no longer selling products, it is selling experiences.

 

______________________________

 

how [will] mobile change everything about your industry?

______________________________

 

So how do you build the next 100-year company? You first need to ask yourself how the ascendance of mobile will change everything about your industry.

 

Just as Steelcase got its start making metal wastebaskets, the next 100-year-company may be currently engaged in the creation of something so mundane, yet so practical, that we may not know how to recognize it yet as a future innovator.

 

Read the full post here.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
Scoop.it!

Shiny Syndrome: In Medicine, Falling for Fake Innovation

Shiny Syndrome:  In Medicine, Falling for Fake Innovation | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it
We need to stop glorifying every new technology as an innovation.

 

An opinionator post that is a cause for pause, when innovation turns into pseudo-innovation, higher cost and no improved results, or worse yet, poorer results.

 

Excerpted:

 

THE sleek, four-armed “da Vinci” robot has been called a breakthrough technology for procedures like prostate surgery. “Imagine,” the manufacturer says, “having the benefits of a definitive treatment but with the potential for significantly less pain, a shorter hospital stay, faster return to normal daily activities.”

 

_______________________

 

...this is a pseudo-innovation — a technology that increases costs without improving patients’ health.

_______________________

 

Critics of the health care reform act say such innovations will be stifled by the new law, with its emphasis on cost control and the comparative effectiveness of new pills and devices.

 

However...

 

The da Vinci robot costs more than a million dollars, has never been shown by a randomized trial to improve the outcomes of prostate surgery. A 2009 study showed that while patients had shorter hospital stays and fewer surgical complications like blood loss when they underwent this kind of robotic surgery, they later “experienced more … incontinence and erectile dysfunction.” Similar problems are occurring with robotic surgery for other cancers.

 

 

The Affordable Care Act will not reward this kind of innovation. But by providing incentives for hospitals to reduce infections, errors and readmissions, giving doctors more information on the comparative effectiveness of medical interventions and emphasizing preventive care over expensive services, the act will stimulate a panoply of true medical innovations. These may not be flashy; they might not even be visible to patients. But they will improve health care and lower costs.

 

Source:  http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/27/in-medicine-falling-for-fake-innovation/


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Connectivism
Scoop.it!

Brainstorm in Progress: Why MOOCs Work

Brainstorm in Progress: Why MOOCs Work | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

I have been reading articles lately written by educators who have not participated in MOOCs but nonetheless seem to have some pretty strong opinions about them such as the "What's the Matter With MOOCs" by Siva Vaidhyanathan from the august (Latin for "dusty, old, and conservative") Chronicle of Higher Ed.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Connectivism
Scoop.it!

Seeking Systemic Change: Higher Education in a Digital, Networked Age: A Q&A with George Siemens

Seeking Systemic Change: Higher Education in a Digital, Networked Age: A Q&A with George Siemens | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

A widely recognized thought leader, author, and researcher in higher education,  George Siemens is the Associate Director of the Technology Enhanced Knowledge Research Institute at Athabasca University, leading the learning analytics research team.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from The Way We Lead
Scoop.it!

Ten Skills for the Future Workforce

Ten Skills for the Future Workforce | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

Sense-making, social intelligence, novel & adaptive thinking, cross-cultural competency, computational thinking, new-media literacy, transdisciplarity, design mindset, cognitive load management, virtual collaboration. These are the 10 skills needed for the future workforce. For a full report, see the work done by Apollo Research Institute (formerly the University of Phoenix Research Institute) looking at the Skills Needed by 2020. A summery of the report and detailed findings about each of the skills are also available.


Via Marcia Conner, Richard Andrews, David Hain, donhornsby, Professor Jill Jameson, Charney Coaching & Consulting
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from The Way We Lead
Scoop.it!

The 5 traits of radically successful people

The 5 traits of radically successful people | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it
Guest Post

I have a crazy idea: success isn’t just about hard work. We hear about hard work all the time—it’s what Olympic champions talk about when they get to the top of the podium and it’s what...

Via Jose Luis Yañez, David Hain, Professor Jill Jameson, Charney Coaching & Consulting
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from The Way We Lead
Scoop.it!

RSA Animate - Drive: The surprising truth about what motivates us

This lively RSAnimate, adapted from Dan Pink's talk at the RSA, illustrates the hidden truths behind what really motivates us. How to build an organisation being a "purpose maximizer".


Via Wendy Briggs Morin, Sabrina Murphy, Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN, Charney Coaching & Consulting
more...
Alexander Hamilton's curator insight, March 6, 2013 4:32 PM

Love the book Drive! 

Sabrina Murphy's curator insight, November 8, 2014 3:02 PM

3 drivers: Autonomy, Mastery, Purpose

Rescooped by Robin Martin from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

Committing to Feedback on the Specifics: How Senior Leaders Actually Can Change

Committing to Feedback on the Specifics:  How Senior Leaders Actually Can Change | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

Senior executives have a bottleneck in the "doing" of change.  Specifics targeting of what to change make all the difference.

 

Jumping through the Knowing-Doing Gap is key - referencing Jeffrey Pfeffer and Robert I Sutton, authors of a book by the same name.

.

Excerpts:

 

Scott Keller talks about research findings for the book, Beyond Performance, and says most executives don't see themselves as part of the problem. 

.

He says that most people also have an unwarranted optimism in relation to their own behavior. …In many behavior-related areas, human beings consistently think they are better than they are — a phenomenon referred to in psychology as a "self-serving bias." 

 

.

Whereas conventional change management approaches surmise that top team role modeling is a matter of will or skill, the inconvenient truth is that the real bottleneck to role modeling is knowing what to change at a personal level.

 

 

.

Typically, insight into what to change can be created by concrete 360-degree feedback techniques, either via surveys, conversations or both. This 360-degree feedback should not be against generic HR leadership competency models, but should instead be against the specific behaviors related to the desired changes that will drive business performance. 

 

.

Three Examples:

Amgen CEO Kevin Sharer uses the approach of asking each of his top 75, "What should I do differently?" and sharing his development needs and commitment publicly with them. 

.

 

A top team of a national insurance company routinely uses a "circle of feedback" during their change program: Every participant receives feedback live in the room, directly from their colleagues on "What are your strengths?" in relation to "being the change" as well as "Where can you improve?" 

 

.

A leadership coalition (top 25) of a multi-regional bank who, after each major event in their change program, conducted a short, targeted 360-degree feedback survey regarding how well their behaviors role-modeled the desired behaviors during the event, ensuring that feedback was timely, relevant and practical.

 

The full post is here.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

Managing Leadership Change: the Transition to a Social Business, New Experts May Emerge

Managing Leadership Change: the Transition to a Social Business, New Experts May Emerge | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"What's working in social business in 2012? Tech sales, marketing and the speakers circuits are doing well. Implementation and organizational change are lagging behind.  New leader & experts may be emerging in the gap."

 

There's helpful context in this piece in understanding social business in 2012, now that social media is becoming mainstream.   Transparency reigns.  Traditional organizational structures will not be able to keep up.

 

Excerpts:

 

______________________

 

...new leaders and experts may emerge, as it takes different leadership and an understanding of networks to support a social business.

______________________

 

 

...Pervasive connectivity changes organizational power structures, though the full effects of this take time to become visible. From a transparent environment new leaders and experts may emerge, as it takes different leadership and an understanding of networks to support a social business.

 

...Interconnected people and interlinked information flows, and these will bypass established structures and services. Work gets more democratic as it becomes visible to all.

 

Agile social businesses need people who can work in concert on solving problems, not waiting for direction from above. Management must ask: how can we help you work in this transparent environment? 

 

______________________

 

Changing to more social behaviors takes time, but most of all, it takes trust.

______________________

 

 

In social networks we often learn from each other; modelling behaviors, telling stories and sharing what we know.  While not highly efficient, this is very effective for learning.

 

There is a need to model the new behaviors of being transparent and narrating one’s work.

 

Social business also requires power-sharing; for how long will workers collaborate and share if they cannot take action with their new knowledge and connectivity?

 

Changing to more social behaviors takes time, but most of all, it takes trust.

 

Once social technologies have been installed, modelling new work behaviors becomes the main organizational challenge.

 

Sources:   By @hjarche via @charlesjennings


Via juandoming, Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

Russell Goldsmith of City National, on Storytelling’s Power in a Powerful, Positive Culture

Russell Goldsmith of City National, on Storytelling’s Power in a Powerful, Positive Culture | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

The power of a story to teach, reinforce culture, and reward behavior, is central for how this bank executive leads at City National Bank in Los Angeles.

 

This reminds me of the power of the story by consulting colleague, Dr. Rick Fenwick, of Fenwick-Koller Associates.  We recently completed another round of Team Concept training for the UAW workers at GM Powertrain.  Our 4 day session is nuanced by story, Rick's colorful examples as well as stories shared by team members, learning about managing team experiences, including tools to help.

 

Goldsmith's example below embeds recognition and reward of the story into the culture of City National Bank.

 

 

Excerpt:

Russell Goldsmith is chairman and chief executive of City National Bank in Los Angeles. In its “Story Idol” competition, he says, employees talk about “what they did that promoted teamwork or helped a client by going the extra mile.”

 

_____________________________

 

We [taught] people how to share stories [including] something called “Story Idol,” and every quarter there’s a competition...

_____________________________

 

 

...we have a lot of great stories to tell. If you look up City National, one of the stories you will see is the story of Frank Sinatra’s son who was kidnapped. The first C.E.O., Al Hart, was a real friend of Frank Sinatra’s and famously opened the vault on a Saturday and got the ransom money. That happened in the early ’60s, but people are still telling that story. It’s a source of pride.

 

We brought in consultants to teach people how to share stories in a more organized way that underscored the culture. We do something called “Story Idol,” and every quarter there’s a competition among our 79 offices.

 

It’s a way to give colleagues a pat on the back and a moment in the sun for doing the right thing, and it democratizes and decentralizes positive reinforcement.

 

_____________________________

 

...what matters most is the recognition, and the respect from your peers as you stand on the stage in front of 300 people.

_____________________________

 

The people who submit the winning stories [Story Idol competition] all get iPads. The winners themselves ...get significant cash awards. But what matters most is the recognition, and the respect from your peers as you stand on the stage in front of 300 people.

 

Read the full post via the New York Times by author ADAM BRYANT here.

 

===

 

Thanks to my change colleague, Liz Guthridge, @LizGuthridge, for the heads up. If you have a change leader that merits a look via this curation stream, let me know via DebNystrom@Reveln.com or suggest it as a curation post in ScoopIt.

 

More about us, on the Fenwick Koller Associates team with Reveln Consulting is here.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

Leadership Teams: Success Factors! Where Teamwork Thrives in the Money Management Industry

Leadership Teams:  Success Factors! Where Teamwork Thrives in the Money Management Industry | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

Factors that truly differentiate top firms. It's the leader teams!

Recently, the Focus Consulting Group surveyed more than 100 asset management firms around the world, testing both for the strength of their cultures and for the effectiveness of their leadership teams....

 

Excerpts:

 

Of the investment professionals we surveyed, fully 94% agree with the statement: "Culture is important to our firm's success." Why do they think so? For them, the key benefit is "effective decision making." Both are interesting findings from an industry often seen as celebrating lone geniuses and superstars.

 

The same "elite" six firms that demonstrated superior cultures also posted senior leadership teamwork scores that are significantly higher than average. In particular, they distinguished themselves from the rest of the investment industry on five dimensions.

 

Source:  http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2012/04/where_teamwork_thrives_in_the.html?awid=9186393578493521766-3271

 

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

UnConventional ~ Josh James, CEO, Hiring the Underqualified & Angry, Learning on the Job

UnConventional ~ Josh James, CEO, Hiring the Underqualified & Angry, Learning on the Job | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

Josh James, Founder and CEO of Domo; Author of Startup Rules responds to ~ The Case for Hiring “Under Qualified" by digging deeper into his hiring philosophy & success.  He's also the all-star executive who also co-founded Omniture and took it from inception to IPO to sale for $1.8B to Adobe

 

Assessments don't catch what Josh James is talking about, the renegades, the untested, as well as the angry ones who have something to prove.  In that light, Josh James proves how one of his rules shows the limits of the others. - Deb

______________________________

  

#45:  No Unemployed Candidates. Always an Excuse. Too Risky. Top-Rated, currently employed candidates who won’t leave… PERFECT.”

______________________________


Excerpts:

Josh James's response to "Dave, Dave, Dave..." in Forbes focusing on his Rule 45: "No Unemployed Candidates. Always an Excuse. Too Risky. Top-Rated, Currently Employed Candidates Who Won’t Leave… PERFECT.”

______________________________

 

...a handful of my executives ...had been fired from their previous job. They were so angry and motivated to prove the world wrong...that I couldn’t resist.

______________________________

 

I’ve always believed that hiring people with untapped potential can serve as a tremendous accelerant to your business. This is something I learned very early on in my career and has been a staple of my hiring and promoting decisions throughout the course of running my businesses. 

______________________________

  

...hire orphans, picked-on people, or people who have been fired for that exact reason—they are motivated...

______________________________

 

[However], if you were faced with hiring 10 employees who were terminated for one reason or another, or hiring 10 employees who were top-rated, currently employed individuals who didn’t want to initially even interview, then I think the latter group would prove to contain dramatically more successful individuals 90% of the time.

That said, a handful of my executives at Omniture who had been fired from their previous job.  

They were so angry and motivated to prove the world wrong (another one of my rules: hire orphans, picked-on people, or people who have been fired for that exact reason—they are motivated), that I couldn’t resist.  


...We have an obligation to the rest of our employees and their families to ensure we have a world-class, globally competitive company.  In order to do that, I want to stack the cards in our favor as much as possible.  Capitalism isn’t always nice.

If you look at my other rules, (DN:  In his list of 55 Start-Up Rules) you’ll notice number 46:

  

There are exceptions to every rule and to the extent you make the exceptions, you accept greater risk, but you can also receive greater reward.  

   
In that vein, my startup rule number 20 (also found at http://www.joshjames.com) speaks to that, about hiring the underprivileged and undeserved, who, although they haven’t had the best chances yet, they have the gumption, desire, and enthusiasm and are just waiting for the right person to believe in them.

Half of my management team at Omniture and already half of the leaders who have received promotions at Domo are people who were or are learning on the job.  

We are chock full of people whom I have my eye on and who are killing it in their positions. 

They will deserve and receive promotions down the road despite their lack of a been-there-done-that resume. They have the intangibles.  (DN: That don't show up on assessments, necessarily.)

And by the way, we’re hiring.  - Josh James


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from The 21st Century
Scoop.it!

Deschool Yourself: 4 Reasons to Change the Way We View Education

Deschool Yourself: 4 Reasons to Change the Way We View Education | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

The way in which we view education has a lot to do with our past; how we grew up, societal influences, and the way we were schooled ourselves. It is the legacy that we pass on to our children. Tragically, the current way our education system is engineered, it appears our children seem doomed to be unsuccessful.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
more...
Charles Sampson's comment, July 17, 2012 8:58 AM
Thank you!
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
Scoop.it!

Improvisation May Be the Key to Successfully Managing Change, MIT

Improvisation May Be the Key to Successfully Managing Change, MIT | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"Key attributes for almost any organization, and SO CHALLENGING to implement: agility , flexibility, improvisation – a company’s ability to quickly change is crucial to its long-term success."

 

 MIT's Leadership Center weighs in via an article by professor Wanda J. Orlikowski that equates a successful company to an orchestra.   Yes, I've heard this before.  Benjamin Zander is quite compelling in his leadership videos on this very note, pun intended.

 

_______________________________

 

...to allow for improvisation, CEOs need to release some control and allow employees to experiment.
_______________________________

 

What is helpful in the article is yet another example of "letting go" as in, "sometimes, however, the conductor needs to let go and let its skilled and creative musicians lead."  Well now, MIT, yes.  And Orpheus, the conductor-less orchestra, has taught us as much.  Releasing "some control" as quoted below, is the magic sauce, in my opinion, and adding in some feedback and perspective, on lessons learned, is a part of it.

 

_______________________________

 

"sometimes, however, the conductor needs to let go and let its skilled and creative musicians lead."

 

Yes, Orpheus, the conductor-less orchestra, has taught us as much. 

 

_______________________________

 

It is always, helpful, however to review suggestions for how to create and sustain an agile, flexible, improvisational culture.  

 

Here are Orlikowski's tips for creating such an organization, excerpted:

 

Plan to improvise - sometimes you can anticipate change, and if you can do that, you should plan to address that change in a flexible way Adapt when you cannot foresee – as business rules are changing, adapt and test on a smaller, departmental scale before making company-wide changes Create a learning environment – encourage communication between your employees in different locations and departments, push everyone to learn from each other Encourage flexibility – to allow for improvisation, CEOs need to release some control and allow employees to experiment Improvise today for success tomorrow – create a culture of experimentation and improvisation even when you’re not experiencing extreme change in practice for when you do need to change

 

 

A companion article and video to this one is how Asst. Professor Steve Leybourne, Boston University experiences improv connected with the finance industry, creating a model and citing risk, reward in managers who surreptitiously improvise.   In his video, you'll see evidence of the "let go of micromanaging" and still how it is tentative in corporate culture.  It seems we have a long way to go to let go, but writing about those who research it is a start.  

 

Source:  http://www.scoop.it/t/innovation-institutions-will-it-blend/p/1715217458/moving-beyond-surreptitious-manager-improv-risk-reward-emerging-best-practice-in-your-org-steve-leybourne

 

What is your experience with creating a culture that is agile , flexible, and especially improvisational?

 

 

Photo credit:   ePi.Longo  Article source:  Chief Executive Magazine


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
Scoop.it!

Faster and more creative when solving OTHER people's problems

Faster and more creative when solving OTHER people's problems | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it
Recent research reveals that people are more capable of mental novelty when thinking on behalf of others than for themselves.

 

Great piece on enriching the field of view and other perspectives, something we also encourage in executive coaching.  

 

________________________

 

...abstract thinking leads to greater creativity. ...But in our businesses and our lives, we often do the opposite.

________________________

 

Excerpts:

 

Over the years, social scientists have found that abstract thinking leads to greater creativity. That means that if we care about innovation we need to be more abstract and therefore more distant. But in our businesses and our lives, we often do the opposite. We intensify our focus rather than widen our view. We draw closer rather than step back.

 

That's a mistake, Polman and Emich suggest. "That decisions for others are more creative than decisions for the self... should prove of considerable interest to negotiators, managers, product designers, marketers and advertisers, among many others," they write.

 

Dan Pink's suggestions, excerpted:

  

• Recruit more independent directors.   Begin with corporate governance. 

~ having independent directors on the boards of public companies. 

 

• Rethink the structure of your firm.

Perhaps loose alliances of distantly connected people

 

• Harness the power of peers.

....assemble a small group of peers – all from different industries – and gather periodically to exchange ideas and offer solutions from new perspectives.

 

• Find a problem-swapping partner.

Find a friend or colleague with whom you can occasionally swap problems...

 

• Disasssociate yourself.

Imagine you're doing it for someone else...

 

Full article here


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Connectivism
Scoop.it!

Aaron Hansen's Blog of eLearning and Wonderment: Connectivism in the Gifted Classroom

Aaron Hansen's Blog of eLearning and Wonderment: Connectivism in the Gifted Classroom | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

Connectivism...it's all the rage these days!  But what does it mean? Is it learning theory? A pedagogy? What does it look like? What are it's implications for learning?  Would it apply to gifted learners too?


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Connectivism
Scoop.it!

‘I can’t count the reasons I should stay, one by one they all just fade away’ – The power of community in higher education and work | Peter Bryant

‘I can’t count the reasons I should stay, one by one they all just fade away’ – The power of community in higher education and work | Peter Bryant | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from The Way We Lead
Scoop.it!

Most Common Change Management Mistakes Companies Make | Leader's Beacon

Most Common Change Management Mistakes Companies Make | Leader's Beacon | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it
We are occasionally asked about mistakes that we see companies make related to organizational change management. In reflecting back over several years and many client engagements, below are the most common mistakes that we have seen.

Via Charney Coaching & Consulting
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from The Way We Lead
Scoop.it!

7 Habits of Extraordinary Teams

7 Habits of Extraordinary Teams | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it
Want better teamwork and greater success? Make sure your employees are following these easy guidelines.

 

Everybody agrees that "teamwork" is crucial to business success--but few people bother define what "teamwork" really is.

 

A few years ago, Phil Geldart (author of the classic In Your Hands, the Behaviors of a World Class Leader) explained to me a set of principles that allow teams to overcome even the most thorny business challenges.

 

Based on that conversation, here are the seven characteristics of truly extraordinary teams:


Via donhornsby, Charney Coaching & Consulting
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

Change Leading: Why Gen Y Could Believe In Your Cause And Your Company

Change Leading:  Why Gen Y Could Believe In Your Cause And Your Company | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"Gen Y notoriously rallies for movements and startups they love.  How can you  reach out Gen Y to lead change in your company?"

This post does a remarkable job of turning conventions around, like parents teaching their children.  Who hasn't learned from their own kids about how to use social media better, as one example?  How can we listen into generations to help change happen & stick?

 

_________________

   

 

To those who say we're the lazy generation, the entitled generation, the arrogant generation, you're right. We're “lazy” because we work smarter. - Yael Cohen, The 100 Most Creative People In Business

_________________

 

   

Excerpts:

 

Here's how to recruit Gen Y to your side:


1. Define your space: Build for a specific demographic and build remarkably for them.  Be proud of what you do, and it'll show.


2. Be completely authentic: Our generation knows how to find a fraudulent needle in a digital haystack, so stay true to your space and the audience you intend to serve.


3. Ask for action: Ask! If your campaign, movement, or organization doesn't have a call to action, how can you expect a response? Impressions are wasted without a call to action. Even if it's a simple "Read More" or "Go Here," you need to have a goal with every interaction.


To those who say we're the lazy generation, the entitled generation, the arrogant generation, you're right. We're “lazy” because we work smarter.

 

We're the arrogant "kids" who will change the world for the better, who will start fixing the world instead of just breaking it, who will streamline banalities, and who will exploit joy.

 

 

Source:  Yael Cohen, The 100 Most Creative People In Business

 

Yael founded Fuck Cancer in 2009 after her mother was diagnosed with breast cancer. Determined to make a real impact within the cancer space, she created an organization that activates Generation Y to engage with their parents about early detection, and teaches supporters how to look for cancer instead of just find it.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 22, 2012 1:48 AM
Our generation has moved forward because of technology. But it is true that many aged individuals could hardly accept the fact and they are extremely confused on how the younger people act the way they do. It is actually a matter of acceptance and respect so as to avoid clash with the younger generation. We also have to accept that this is their time, and they should be allowed to enjoy their era.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, September 23, 2012 10:32 AM
@Victoria, so true. Thanks for the comments. Fast Company (also Scooped on one of my curations streams, covers "Generation Flux," which is ageless. In general, though, I agree with "We also have to accept that this is their time, and they should be allowed to enjoy their era." ~ Deb
Emeric Nectoux's curator insight, February 11, 2014 11:52 PM

This post does a remarkable job of turning conventions around, like parents teaching their children.  Who hasn't learned from their own kids about how to use social media better, as one example?  How can we listen into generations to help change happen & stick?

 

_________________

 

"To those who say we are the lazy generation, the entitled generation, the arrogant generation, you're right. We're “lazy” because we work smarter." - Yael Cohen, The 100 Most Creative People In Business

_________________

 

   

Excerpts:

 

Here's how to recruit Gen Y to your side:


1. Define your space: Build for a specific demographic and build remarkably for them.  Be proud of what you do, and it'll show.


2. Be completely authentic: Our generation knows how to find a fraudulent needle in a digital haystack, so stay true to your space and the audience you intend to serve.


3. Ask for action: Ask! If your campaign, movement, or organization doesn't have a call to action, how can you expect a response? Impressions are wasted without a call to action. Even if it's a simple "Read More" or "Go Here," you need to have a goal with every interaction.


To those who say we're the lazy generation, the entitled generation, the arrogant generation, you're right. We're “lazy” because we work smarter.

 

We're the arrogant "kids" who will change the world for the better, who will start fixing the world instead of just breaking it, who will streamline banalities, and who will exploit joy.

 

Rescooped by Robin Martin from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

To Supercharge Growth, Start By Tearing Down Silos, Case: IRIS International

To Supercharge Growth, Start By Tearing Down Silos, Case:  IRIS International | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"How IRIS International treated its toxic company culture to achieve dramatic growth."

Learn How IRIS International became a company that is setting the bar in innovation, collaboration, and growth.

Excerpts:

When César García came to IRIS International 10 years ago, the company was on the ropes. The manufacturer of medical diagnostic products had a stale product line, flat revenues, and mounting debt.

_______________

 

Annual revenue [lept] from $28 million in 2002 to $118 million last year.

_______________

   

 

García welcomed the challenge of a turnaround and in 2003, he became president and CEO of IRIS (International Remote Imaging Systems). He brought in a new management team. Secured debt refinancing. Pushed hard for new product development.

But García quickly concluded that the real problem was IRIS’s toxic company culture. It was a culture that kept its employees locked in silos and prevented the organization from seizing external opportunities.

The transformation at IRIS under García’s leadership has been extraordinary. The company has launched 15 new products in the last 10 years. Annual revenue has leaped from $28 million in 2002 to $118 million last year, with $129 million projected for 2012. 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

Change leadership investment pays off in big income boost, case study

Change leadership investment pays off in big income boost, case study | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"Change success:  Putting leadership development at the heart of a major operations-improvement effort paid off in BIG boost in income for a global industrial company."

 

Once again, a smart leadership investment pays off during a major change implementation boosting income by about $1.5 billion a year.

 

Excerpts from the case example:

 

Too often senior executives overlook the “softer” skills their leaders will need to disseminate changes throughout the organization and make them stick. These skills include:

keeping managers and workers inspired when they feel overwhelmed,  promoting collaboration across organizational boundaries,  helping managers embrace change programs through dialogue, not dictation ______________________________ The senior team had to look beyond technical improvements and focus on helping the company’s leaders... ______________________________
In this case example, drives for improvement carried a stigma of incompetence, current performance was considered “good enough”, and conflict tended to be passive-aggressive.  There was also a pervasive fear of making mistakes—reinforced by the company’s strong culture of safety and of risk aversion.

The senior team had to look beyond technical improvements and focus on helping the company’s leaders to master the personal behavioral changes needed to support the operational ones.

 

The company mounted an intense, immersive, and individualized leadership program.  The results are still unfolding, but after three years the company estimates that the improvement program has already boosted annual pretax operating income by about $1.5 billion a year. Furthermore, executives see the new leadership behavior as crucial to that ongoing success.

 

Read the full story here.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

Leading in a VUCA change world - Are you ready for the volatile, uncertain, complex & ambiguous?

Leading in a VUCA change world - Are you ready for the volatile, uncertain, complex & ambiguous? | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"How’s your leadership working on in your VUCA world (Volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous)? "

 

Liz Guthridge has written a great post on leading in a VUCA world; VCUA stands for volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous, a term coined by the US Army War College in the weeks before September 11, 2001.  

 

Liz & I discussed the need for collaboration and community across disciplines to succeed in a VUCA world in connection with our recent panel + Open Space presentation we did for a global change conference on Success Secrets of Trusted Change Advisors.

 

__________________________

 

VUCA can provide threats [and] offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.” ~ Dr. Bob Johansen

__________________________

 

Here are some excerpts of her take on the insightful presentation by one of our keynote presenters:

 

"Leading in a VUCA world" is a popular phrase with Bob Johansen, a distinguished fellow and former president of Institute for the Future.

 

According to Dr. Johansen, who shared his 2020 forecast at the Association of Change Management Professionals global conference this week, our VUCA world is not going away. In fact it’s just going to spin faster during the next decade.

 

In his talk “External Future Forces That Will Disrupt the Practice of Change Management,” Dr. Johansen noted that VUCA is not necessarily doom and gloom. While VUCA can provide threats, it also can offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.”

 

As for his two big 2022 predictions for organizational change agents, they are:

 

1. “The digital natives (now 16 years or younger) will create new practices to make change through gaming.” (The other key phrase besides gaming in this sentence is “make.” Dr. Johansen predicts that a culture of makers will drive the next generation of change. And as a result, leaders need to show the “maker instinct” trait.)

 

2. “Reciprocity-based innovation will focus on the economic, social and psychological value of reciprocity.” (Two important traits for leaders are smart-mob organizing and commons creating. Think Creative Commons.)

 

Dr. Johansen challenged the 825 of us in attendance to figure out how to help people and organizations adapt to these changes and others.

 

To do this, we should watch our terms and our questions.  Read Liz's full post here.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
Tom Hood's curator insight, April 6, 2013 5:16 PM

We just covered this in our townhall this past Monday. Arelene Thomas (AICPA/CGMA) talked about VUCA related to CPAs in Biz/Industry.


VUCA can provide threats [and] offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.” ~ Dr. Bob Johansen

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 6, 2013 5:26 PM

We need to consider VUCA

Rescooped by Robin Martin from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

Accessible Leadership: Why the CEO needs to drive communication & culture change to improve customer experience

Accessible Leadership: Why the CEO needs to drive communication & culture change to improve customer experience | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it
Leadership Required: Why the CEO needs to drive communication and culture change to improve customer experience.

 

A simple but not simplistic 3 point list of a leader's role in communicating with all hands in culture change. From Experience Required™

 

Excerpted:

 

 

The CEO’s role must be one of brand champion...[to] ensure that the company’s brand strategy is implemented, instead of becoming just another “thing” that everyone should do.

 

Here are three things leaders can start to do today to ensure greater success:

 

#1. Be visible.
Employees need to see you (literally) leading the effort ...[to] know that you truly believe in its value and its impact. Get out and develop relationships with your employees. ...[and] hear what’s really going on from those that directly interact with your customers.

 

#2. Give feedback regularly.
Recognize employees often with specific feedback on what they did well. Help them connect to the purpose and how their individual efforts fit in with the big picture.

 

Giving their work greater meaning helps them realize they’re working for a company they can be proud of. 

 

#3. Demonstrate quick wins.
Make it a point to regularly update employees on progress. Show them how their feedback led to actionable improvements in process, employee, and customer experiences.

 

You have to walk the talk and show you’re prepared to make changes that improve the experience. Once your employees realize their input is valued, they’ll open up more and be more motivated to follow your example.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

Leading via Smart Delay, Pro-cras-ti-nation Power

Leading via Smart Delay, Pro-cras-ti-nation Power | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

Is it wise to be so obsessed with speed? Businesses are forever saying that they need more creativity. Dithering & tinkering can help. 

   

In praise of smart procrastination:

   

..."slowing down makes us more ethical. When confronted with a clear choice between right and wrong, people are five times more likely to do the right thing if they have time to think about it than if they are forced to make a snap decision.
   
Organisations with a “fast pulse” (such as banks) are more likely to suffer from ethical problems than those that move more slowly.
   
More context in the original article here:

 

 

Source:  http://www.economist.com/node/21558218?goback=%2Egde_1935110_member_133370249

 

 

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
No comment yet.