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If you lead them, they will follow!
Traits today's leaders "must have" to survive and lead without self-destructing
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Tyranny of the Queen Bee

Tyranny of the Queen Bee | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"Is something is amiss in the professional sisterhood?"

The term "queen bee syndrome" was coined in the 1970s, following a study led by researchers at the University of Michigan...who examined promotion rates and the impact of the women's movement on the workplace.

 

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...the patriarchal culture of work encouraged the few women who rose to the top to become obsessed with maintaining their authority.

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...They found that women who achieved success in male-dominated environments were at times likely to oppose the rise of other women.

 

 

Four decades later, the syndrome still thrives... The very women who have complained for decades about unequal treatment now perpetuate many of the same problems by turning on their own.

 

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...female bullies directed their hostilities toward other women 80% of the time—up 9% since 2007.

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In 2010, the Workplace Bullying Institute, a national education and advocacy group, reported that female bullies directed their hostilities toward other women 80% of the time—up 9% since 2007.

 

Male bullies, by contrast, were generally equal-opportunity tormentors.




Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 16, 2013 4:56 AM

There was syncronicity here:  that the term "Queen Bee" originated at my alma mater, University of Michigan, where I ALSO experienced the term in use, as a young-un in my 20s in my first professional position.


It's the stories and commentary here that move this post to Change Leader Watch.


In the comments Susan Nierenberg writes:  “Leaders Pay It Forward,” debunks the Queen Bee myth. The findings show that women do indeed help other women get ahead.   In fact, the study found that women leaders are more likely to develop new female talent than men are!


65% percent of women who received career development support are now developing new talent, compared to 56% percent of men—and 73% of the women developing new talent are developing other women, compared to 30 percent of men!   


I still see the syndrome and bullying as a problem today from other sources.   However, Susan's references are worth a look.


~  Deb 

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Female muscle, the Changing Politics & Economy of Gender, Women in Leadership

Female muscle, the Changing Politics & Economy of Gender, Women in Leadership | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"Insights into Leadership & the Politics of Gender via the book, The End of Men: And the Rise of Women by Hanna Rosin to be published in Britain in October"

 

At the local Women's Exchange of Washtenaw Forum 2012, one of our Open Space group discussions was on the Politics of Gender.  This intriguing book brings up good points about the shifts & changes in our disruptive, social media charged, globally connected world.    

   

The photo set, including several public photos, is here:  Women, Empowerment at WXW Open Space Exchange Forum2012   ~  Deb

  

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“All the things we need to be good at to thrive in the world…are things that my female friends and competitors are better at than me.”

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Excerpted - from the Economist, Sept. 2012:

   

Women dominate university attendance around the world.

   

In South Korea more women than men pass the foreign-service exam, which has sparked the foreign ministry to implement a minimum quota for men.      In Brazil nearly a third of women earn more than their husbands, a phenomenon that has caused men to form church support-groups calling themselves “Men of Tears”.     Ms Rosin, an editor at Atlantic, whose book grew out of an article she wrote for the magazine in 2010, highlights how women today are excelling, while men founder.     As part of her research, she travelled to many corners of America, including Auburn-Opelika, Alabama, where women’s median income is 40% higher than men’s.       

The financial crisis has been especially unkind to men: three-quarters of the 7.5m American jobs lost in the recession belonged to men and were in traditionally masculine industries, such as construction, manufacturing and finance.

   

“Probably no one has had their wife move up the ladder as far as I’ve moved down,” says one man.     Another, who is annoyed that his girlfriend earns more than he does, complains, “All the things we need to be good at to thrive in the world…are things that my female friends and competitors are better at than me.”

  

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The new service-based economy rewards communication and adaptation, qualities that women are more likely to have.

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Ms Rosin highlights the deterioration of the male-in-the-workplace condition.

    

The new service-based economy rewards communication and adaptation, qualities that women are more likely to have.       Only about 3% of men have taken over raising children full-time while their wives support their families.       Instead, many men, especially young ones, have retreated into a world of video games, drinking and prolonged adolescence—a phenomenon identified in “Guyland”, a 2008 book by an American sociologist, Michael Kimmel.

 

Read the full post here.


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Yahoo's Marissa Mayer Is No Fool

Yahoo's Marissa Mayer Is No Fool | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"Like any good leader, she knows who creates real value, and how, in her company." She's seen and is acting on the performance results.

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...she was predisposed to consider physical (co)presence as essential to digital innovation success...

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Blog author Michael Schrage says,

 

"Mayer's Google background (and impact) suggested that she was predisposed to consider physical (co)presence as essential to digital innovation success as computational/design brilliance.

 

…the Googleplex for its employees wasn't health food benevolence, it was to keep people on campus working together."


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 5, 2013 4:27 PM

This is an opposing view to the last ScoopIt post.    Seven (7) months is still a short term view in light of this HBR blogger's view that Ms. Mayer is on the right track.


Previous culture can also be a blind spot.  One culture's success does not always paste onto another's key needs.

Change colleague Liz Guthridge, who specializes in change communication, suggests that leaders Avoid “taser” asks to get others to act, referencing Mayer's style of communicating the change.  I tend to agree with Liz.  Yet, there are bigger issues than communication mistakes.    


Time will tell.  ~ Deb

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“Double Down” Women, Leaders & Careers, Kudos and Ire » You Can't Have it All?

“Double Down” Women, Leaders & Careers, Kudos and Ire » You Can't Have it All? | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"The executive work/life dilemma for women and men includes Steve Jobs' contributions while seriously ill - a provocative thought piece by the Glass Hammer."

 

Change leaders are culture leaders. The American leader work ethic for women and men is featured here, in controversy about growing leaders, both women and men. It's a long term, evolving change & leadership issue with shifting impact for both genders. ~ Deb

 

Excerpts:  

 

There’s increasing polarization on the subject of how to handle work-life’s ever-escalating challenges for women.

   

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“Work-life balance is not some nice idea that isn’t achievable or important. It is important to all of us for sustainable mental and physical health & well-being. The key word is sustainable.”

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The friction is visible in the varied media responses to news that incoming Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer will be the first female CEO to take the top spot while pregnant, and to Anne-Marie Slaughter’s controversial cover story for The Atlantic, Why Women Still Can’t Have It All.

 

Part of the dilemma revolves around a concept coined by Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s COO: “leaning in” versus “leaning back.”

Sandberg describes how failing to “lean in” inadvertently leads many women to leave the workforce:

“Women almost never make one decision to leave the workforce,” said Sandberg. ...Maybe it’s the last year of med school when they say, I’ll take a slightly less interesting specialty because I’m going to want more balance one day. Maybe it’s the fifth year in a law firm when they say, I’m not even sure I should go for partner, because I know I’m going to want kids eventually. ...And from that moment, they start quietly leaning back. The problem is, often they don’t even realize it.”     “During the last years of his life, [Steve Jobs] created the iPhone, the iPad, he was moving into television.  ...He was very sick...in the last years of life when he didn’t have time.”

  

“Work-life balance is not some nice idea that isn’t achievable or important. It is important to all of us for sustainable mental and physical health and well-being. The key word is sustainable, ” says Teri Johnson.  

 

She suggests the analogy a long distance runner versus a relay racer.

 

“Any of us can push hard in a relay, but the distance runner knows to pace herself, to make rest days as important as training days and to take excellent care of herself to avoid injury. She saves the real push for the race, when it is important.”

   

Read the full post here.

 

Photo credit:  JD Hancock


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