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If you lead them, they will follow!
Traits today's leaders "must have" to survive and lead without self-destructing
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Why Apple, Academia, Tesla & VCs May Die, Disruption Guru Christensen Talks

Why Apple, Academia, Tesla & VCs May Die, Disruption Guru Christensen Talks | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"Harvard business professor Clayton Christensen literally wrote the book on technology disruption...and he thinks Apple, Tesla Motors, venture capitalists and most of the nation’s colleges and universities should be afraid."

  

The author of The Innovator’s Dilemma said Wednesday that all of them could be killed by less advanced competitors in the same way that many once dominant technology companies have been in the past.

  

...He believes that and the commoditization of smartphones threaten Apple in the long run.

  

...“For 300 years, higher education was not disruptable because there was no technological core."

  

“But now online learning brings to higher education this technological core, and people who are very complacent are in deep trouble.'

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...people who are very complacent are in deep trouble.

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...“there is a different business model that is disrupting this in addition to online learning. It’s on-the-job education. ...you come in for a week and we’ll teach you about strategy and you go off and develop a strategy.  


...You learn it and you use it. These are very different business models and that’s what’s killing us.”


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 11, 2013 8:50 AM

I've posted this to BOTH Change Leader Watch & here.  On the Innovations & Institutions stream, I'll be adding examples of organizations that are adapting to this disruption in academe and the other industries mentioned.  ~  Deb

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, February 17, 2013 1:30 PM
Thanks for your comments Marie. Knowledge Management is quite an industry, with various opinions of the traction it holds in business. I am most curious as to where it is headed.
Patrick J Scanlon's curator insight, March 12, 2013 2:58 PM

If you don't like change.  You will like irrelevance even less #media #higherEd #VC

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Why Innovation Dies, Disruption, not Deans: Higher Ed's long, winding Road to Online Education, Forbes

Why Innovation Dies, Disruption, not Deans: Higher Ed's long, winding Road to Online Education, Forbes | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

Here's the companion post to the previous article that features the long & winding road in dealing with online education, and confronts disruption head-on.

 

Author:  Steve Blank   Source:  http://www.forbes.com/sites/groupthink/2012/05/01/why-innovation-dies/2/


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Managing Leadership Change: the Transition to a Social Business, New Experts May Emerge

Managing Leadership Change: the Transition to a Social Business, New Experts May Emerge | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"What's working in social business in 2012? Tech sales, marketing and the speakers circuits are doing well. Implementation and organizational change are lagging behind.  New leader & experts may be emerging in the gap."

 

There's helpful context in this piece in understanding social business in 2012, now that social media is becoming mainstream.   Transparency reigns.  Traditional organizational structures will not be able to keep up.

 

Excerpts:

 

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...new leaders and experts may emerge, as it takes different leadership and an understanding of networks to support a social business.

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...Pervasive connectivity changes organizational power structures, though the full effects of this take time to become visible. From a transparent environment new leaders and experts may emerge, as it takes different leadership and an understanding of networks to support a social business.

 

...Interconnected people and interlinked information flows, and these will bypass established structures and services. Work gets more democratic as it becomes visible to all.

 

Agile social businesses need people who can work in concert on solving problems, not waiting for direction from above. Management must ask: how can we help you work in this transparent environment? 

 

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Changing to more social behaviors takes time, but most of all, it takes trust.

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In social networks we often learn from each other; modelling behaviors, telling stories and sharing what we know.  While not highly efficient, this is very effective for learning.

 

There is a need to model the new behaviors of being transparent and narrating one’s work.

 

Social business also requires power-sharing; for how long will workers collaborate and share if they cannot take action with their new knowledge and connectivity?

 

Changing to more social behaviors takes time, but most of all, it takes trust.

 

Once social technologies have been installed, modelling new work behaviors becomes the main organizational challenge.

 

Sources:   By @hjarche via @charlesjennings


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Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » 2 Billion Jobs to Disappear by 2030

Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » 2 Billion Jobs to Disappear by 2030 | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

2 billion jobs disappearing (approx. 50% of the world's jobs) it was intended as a wakeup call about how quickly things are about to change.  Academia ~ the battle ahead will be taking place at YOUR doorstep.

 

A search for comments on The End of Work: The Decline of the Global Labor Force and the Dawn of the Post-Market Era, a non-fiction book by American economist Jeremy Rifkin reminded me of Bob Johansen, Futurist and also led me to another Futurist, Thomas Frey.

 

Here are excerpts from Frey's TEDx talk:

 

The article includes a brief overview of five (5) industries – where the jobs will be going away and the jobs that will likely replace at least some of them – over the coming decades.


1) Power Industry

 

Jobs Going Away

Power generation plants will begin to close down. Coal plants will begin to close down. Many railroad and transportation workers will no longer be needed. Even wind farms, natural gas, and bio-fuel generators will begin to close down. Ethanol plants will be phased out or repurposed. Utility company engineers, gone. Line repairmen, gone.

 

New Jobs Created

Manufacturing power generation units the size of ac units will go into full production. Installation crews will begin to work around the clock. The entire national grid will need to be taken down (a 20 year project). Much of it will be recycled and the recycling process alone will employ many thousands of people. Micro-grid operations will open in every community requiring a new breed of engineers, managers, and regulators.      

2) Automobile Transportation – Going Driverless

  

Over the next 10 years we will see the first wave of autonomous vehicles hit the roads, with some of the first inroads made by vehicles that deliver packages, groceries, and fast-mail envelopes.

    

3) Education

...courses are becoming a commodity. Teachers only need to teach once, record it, and then move on to another topic or something else. ...we are transitioning from a teaching model to a learning model. Why do we need to wait for a teacher to take the stage in the front of the room when we can learn whatever is of interest to us at any moment?

   

Teaching requires experts. Learning only requires coaches.

   

Jobs Going Away

Teachers. Trainers. Professors.

  

New Jobs Created

Coaches. Course designers. Learning camps     4) 3D Printers
Three-dimensional printing makes it as cheap to create single items as it is to produce thousands of items and thus undermines economies of scale. It may have as profound an impact on the world as the coming of the factory did during the Henry Ford era.

    5) Bots
We are moving quickly past the robotic vacuum cleaner stage to far more complex machines.

   
Read more, Thomas Frey - Futurist Speaker (http://s.tt/1imN0)


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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, October 6, 2012 9:19 PM
The worst is yet to come. Hopefully,we will still survive with this prediction. Indeed, the inventions of human beings are not totally beneficial to human beings. It is amazing, but sad to consider....
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, October 7, 2012 6:36 PM
@Victoria, we will adapt, but we will not ALL adapt. Hopefully education in some areas will catch up sooner, rather than later, to help us make the changes we need, learning the skills at the right time.
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How to Build the 100-Year Company - Michigan Steelcase, Ideas & Endless Innovation

How to Build the 100-Year Company - Michigan Steelcase, Ideas  &  Endless Innovation | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"Steelcase, the long-time maker of innovative workplace furniture, celebrated its 100th anniversary this year, and defines itself not as an office furniture company, rather as a company of ideas."

 

Catch a company that does it right.  Besides IBM and several other rare centarians, Steelcase stands out, in Michigan, in particular.

 

Excerpted:

 

The 100-year company is the rarest of all organizations in Corporate America – a survivor of multiple business cycles, the appearance of radically disruptive technologies and the changing tastes of entirely different generations.

 

In Michigan. Steelcase, doesn't define itself as an office furniture company, but rather, as a company of ideas:

 

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"Companies don't survive for a century, ideas do."

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(Fittingly, Steelcase is a sponsor of the TED Conference). The company, which began by making steel metal wastebaskets back in 1912, thrived during the great post-war Baby Boomer work generation that saw the transition to fixed workplaces and the rise of the modern cubicle worker.

 

Jim Hackett, the CEO of Steelcase, uses a deceptively simple idea to guide the company in this transition to a new mobile economy. He refers to this Big Idea as the movement from the "I/Fixed" paradigm to the "We/Mobile" paradigm.

 

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Steelcase is no longer selling products, it is selling experiences.

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Companies are shifting away from fixed office environments to mobile, collaborative workforces and flexible workspace arrangements that go beyond desks and chairs.

 

One of the company's recently launched product lines is media:scape, which is essentially a blend of furniture and technology to create collaborative workplace environments. At a certain level, Steelcase is no longer selling products, it is selling experiences.

 

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how [will] mobile change everything about your industry?

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So how do you build the next 100-year company? You first need to ask yourself how the ascendance of mobile will change everything about your industry.

 

Just as Steelcase got its start making metal wastebaskets, the next 100-year-company may be currently engaged in the creation of something so mundane, yet so practical, that we may not know how to recognize it yet as a future innovator.

 

Read the full post here.


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