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If you lead them, they will follow!
Traits today's leaders "must have" to survive and lead without self-destructing
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Sustainability is about Impact! The Double Bottom Line > Letting Go to Let Come

Sustainability is about Impact!  The Double Bottom Line > Letting Go to Let Come | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"It's the double bottom line, baby!  ESPECIALLY if you are in non-profit leadership today."

  

I just heard Jeanne Bell, CEO and author of NonProfit Sustainability talk honestly about the double bottom line in her own business as well as in her consulting engagements.  Her fresh, tested perspective rings true.

  

In a nutshell:

  

...in the mythic past it was possible to think first about strategic impact goals, and then about how to raise the money. ...today...you can't talk about what you're going to do without talking about how to get the money. And, you can't talk about how to get money without talking about what you're going to do.    _______________________
  
Cultivate direction, identify sacred cows. Name it. CHANGE it. _______________________      Here are some gems from her presentation today in Flint, Michigan as well as a great Scooped article by her.  Flint is an appropriate setting; it's a place that has seen hard times and where the BEST Funders Collaborative brings in stellar talent to keep non-profits doing what they do best.       Declare change as constant. Model change by turning down money not headed in the right direction.  We have some agency over this – don’t have to jump to funders. " Cultivate direction, identify sacred cows. Name it. CHANGE it. Use good tools, frameworks. DO NOT confuse strategy and planning.    _______________________
     What is sustainable today may be unsustainable tomorrow. _______________________             Excerpted gems from the article:     If the financial goal in a for-profit company is to maximize profit, should our goal as a nonprofit be to have $0 profit? Or should the goal be to grow an endowment of $10 million, or to have a surplus of 5%, or a deficit of no more than $50,000?       The financial goal of a nonprofit is to ensure that it has adequate working capital; that is, its financial goal is to have enough money to do its work over the long term. Today we often use the term sustainability...        What is sustainable today may be unsustainable tomorrow. ...We never arrive at a mix of programs and revenue streams that can be described as permanently sustainable. But we can always be heading in the right direction.        Photo above:  Jeanne Bell, Steve Zimmerman and Jan Masaoka (left to right in photo) are all former nonprofit CFOs and they all appreciate the environmental aspects of sustainability as well. Jeanne is now CEO of CompassPoint Nonprofit Services.     Read more here.        Now I'm hearing Paul Saginaw, co-founder of the very successful Zingermans community of businesses in Ann Arbor talk about founding Food Gatherers, feeding the hungry in Ann Arbor.  Quite the point.
Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Leading in a VUCA change world - Are you ready for the volatile, uncertain, complex & ambiguous?

Leading in a VUCA change world - Are you ready for the volatile, uncertain, complex & ambiguous? | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"How’s your leadership working on in your VUCA world (Volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous)? "

 

Liz Guthridge has written a great post on leading in a VUCA world; VCUA stands for volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous, a term coined by the US Army War College in the weeks before September 11, 2001.  

 

Liz & I discussed the need for collaboration and community across disciplines to succeed in a VUCA world in connection with our recent panel + Open Space presentation we did for a global change conference on Success Secrets of Trusted Change Advisors.

 

__________________________

 

VUCA can provide threats [and] offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.” ~ Dr. Bob Johansen

__________________________

 

Here are some excerpts of her take on the insightful presentation by one of our keynote presenters:

 

"Leading in a VUCA world" is a popular phrase with Bob Johansen, a distinguished fellow and former president of Institute for the Future.

 

According to Dr. Johansen, who shared his 2020 forecast at the Association of Change Management Professionals global conference this week, our VUCA world is not going away. In fact it’s just going to spin faster during the next decade.

 

In his talk “External Future Forces That Will Disrupt the Practice of Change Management,” Dr. Johansen noted that VUCA is not necessarily doom and gloom. While VUCA can provide threats, it also can offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.”

 

As for his two big 2022 predictions for organizational change agents, they are:

 

1. “The digital natives (now 16 years or younger) will create new practices to make change through gaming.” (The other key phrase besides gaming in this sentence is “make.” Dr. Johansen predicts that a culture of makers will drive the next generation of change. And as a result, leaders need to show the “maker instinct” trait.)

 

2. “Reciprocity-based innovation will focus on the economic, social and psychological value of reciprocity.” (Two important traits for leaders are smart-mob organizing and commons creating. Think Creative Commons.)

 

Dr. Johansen challenged the 825 of us in attendance to figure out how to help people and organizations adapt to these changes and others.

 

To do this, we should watch our terms and our questions.  Read Liz's full post here.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Tom Hood's curator insight, April 6, 2013 5:16 PM

We just covered this in our townhall this past Monday. Arelene Thomas (AICPA/CGMA) talked about VUCA related to CPAs in Biz/Industry.


VUCA can provide threats [and] offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.” ~ Dr. Bob Johansen

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 6, 2013 5:26 PM

We need to consider VUCA

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Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » 2 Billion Jobs to Disappear by 2030

Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » 2 Billion Jobs to Disappear by 2030 | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

2 billion jobs disappearing (approx. 50% of the world's jobs) it was intended as a wakeup call about how quickly things are about to change.  Academia ~ the battle ahead will be taking place at YOUR doorstep.

 

A search for comments on The End of Work: The Decline of the Global Labor Force and the Dawn of the Post-Market Era, a non-fiction book by American economist Jeremy Rifkin reminded me of Bob Johansen, Futurist and also led me to another Futurist, Thomas Frey.

 

Here are excerpts from Frey's TEDx talk:

 

The article includes a brief overview of five (5) industries – where the jobs will be going away and the jobs that will likely replace at least some of them – over the coming decades.


1) Power Industry

 

Jobs Going Away

Power generation plants will begin to close down. Coal plants will begin to close down. Many railroad and transportation workers will no longer be needed. Even wind farms, natural gas, and bio-fuel generators will begin to close down. Ethanol plants will be phased out or repurposed. Utility company engineers, gone. Line repairmen, gone.

 

New Jobs Created

Manufacturing power generation units the size of ac units will go into full production. Installation crews will begin to work around the clock. The entire national grid will need to be taken down (a 20 year project). Much of it will be recycled and the recycling process alone will employ many thousands of people. Micro-grid operations will open in every community requiring a new breed of engineers, managers, and regulators.      

2) Automobile Transportation – Going Driverless

  

Over the next 10 years we will see the first wave of autonomous vehicles hit the roads, with some of the first inroads made by vehicles that deliver packages, groceries, and fast-mail envelopes.

    

3) Education

...courses are becoming a commodity. Teachers only need to teach once, record it, and then move on to another topic or something else. ...we are transitioning from a teaching model to a learning model. Why do we need to wait for a teacher to take the stage in the front of the room when we can learn whatever is of interest to us at any moment?

   

Teaching requires experts. Learning only requires coaches.

   

Jobs Going Away

Teachers. Trainers. Professors.

  

New Jobs Created

Coaches. Course designers. Learning camps     4) 3D Printers
Three-dimensional printing makes it as cheap to create single items as it is to produce thousands of items and thus undermines economies of scale. It may have as profound an impact on the world as the coming of the factory did during the Henry Ford era.

    5) Bots
We are moving quickly past the robotic vacuum cleaner stage to far more complex machines.

   
Read more, Thomas Frey - Futurist Speaker (http://s.tt/1imN0)


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, October 7, 2012 12:19 AM
The worst is yet to come. Hopefully,we will still survive with this prediction. Indeed, the inventions of human beings are not totally beneficial to human beings. It is amazing, but sad to consider....
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, October 7, 2012 9:36 PM
@Victoria, we will adapt, but we will not ALL adapt. Hopefully education in some areas will catch up sooner, rather than later, to help us make the changes we need, learning the skills at the right time.
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Leading via Smart Delay, Pro-cras-ti-nation Power

Leading via Smart Delay, Pro-cras-ti-nation Power | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

Is it wise to be so obsessed with speed? Businesses are forever saying that they need more creativity. Dithering & tinkering can help. 

   

In praise of smart procrastination:

   

..."slowing down makes us more ethical. When confronted with a clear choice between right and wrong, people are five times more likely to do the right thing if they have time to think about it than if they are forced to make a snap decision.
   
Organisations with a “fast pulse” (such as banks) are more likely to suffer from ethical problems than those that move more slowly.
   
More context in the original article here:

 

 

Source:  http://www.economist.com/node/21558218?goback=%2Egde_1935110_member_133370249

 

 

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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