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If you lead them, they will follow!
Traits today's leaders "must have" to survive and lead without self-destructing
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Meditating Your Way To More Effective Leadership

Meditating Your Way To More Effective Leadership | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

 

The Drucker School of Management and Wharton Business School both offer courses in mindfulness meditation. Virginia Tech is sponsoring "contemplative practices for a technological society," a conference for engineers who integrate contemplative disciplines into their work. Google offers courses in meditation and yoga

 

Aetna, Merck, General Mills--the list goes on--all are exploring how meditation can help their leaders and employees agilely thrive in today's fast-paced business environment. And the benefits are widely publicized: sustained attention span, improved multi-tasking abilities, strengthened immune system, increased emotional intelligence, improved listening skills...And there is science behind such claims.


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Jem Muldoon's curator insight, February 15, 2013 1:15 PM

When top business schools highlight the importance of mindfulness with courses for future leaders, we now have precedence for including it in educational leadership training.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 15, 2013 4:01 PM

I like the ideas that mindfulness is combined with Peter Drucker's work and that large companies are looking at meditation as something that will benefit employees.

Lauran Star's curator insight, March 19, 2013 8:43 AM

What really happens when we meditate? How can such a simple act of sitting still actually cultivate agile, talented leaders? Read this article to learn more.

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Adapting to Change, Leader Lessons From Jeff Weiner, CEO of LinkedIn - Forbes

Adapting to Change, Leader Lessons From Jeff Weiner, CEO of LinkedIn - Forbes | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

Jeff’s leadership style keeps the company focused on growing at the rate of two new members every second  while reducing the business mantra to just two words: “Next Play.”


Leadership lessons lists abound on-line.  Jeff's list of 10 lessons, however, is tied to a large, successful virtual platform company with real staying power, connected to jobs and career growth - LinkedIn.  


He's obviously trending in the right direction as his inspires his "Next Plays" among his staff.  ~  Deb


Excerpts:


_____________________________

Today, 16 months after the LinkedIn IPO, employees continue to talk about their Next Play and stay focused on delivering results.

_____________________________


Weiner described how powerful the phrase, "Next Play" has been for the company.

 

On the day LinkedIn became a public company, employees received a black T shirt with the company’s name and stock ticker written across the front and Next Play emblazoned on the back of the shirt. Even today 16 months after the LinkedIn IPO, employees continue to talk about their Next Play and stay focused on delivering results.
1) Define leadership : At LinkedIn, Leadership is the ability to inspire others and achieve shared results. ...to create economic opportunity for the 3.3 billion people in the global workplace by matching skills with job opportunities.
3) Prioritize your business goals: ...if we could only do one thing, what would it be? This is a lesson Weiner learned from Steve Jobs and practices every day. 

6) Customers first: ... anytime the LinkedIn product team considers new enhancements the first question revolves around: Is this putting our members first, or is this putting the company first? “If it benefits members, it will ultimately benefit the company.


7) Remember To laugh: ...Weiner says he values his team members’ sense of humor and sometimes, on a tough day, that can trump their talent and expertise!


Read the full post here.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, September 19, 2012 8:42 PM
Thanks Lynn!
Manish Puranik's curator insight, July 9, 2013 9:25 PM

Few more lessons on Leadership...!

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Elite Leadership Tweets and the $1.3 Trillion Price Of Not Tweeting At Work -

Elite Leadership Tweets and the $1.3 Trillion Price Of Not Tweeting At Work - | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"Recently, the CEO of Oracle, one of the largest and most advanced computer tech corporations in the world, tweeted for the very first time and joined a club that remains surprisingly elite."


DN:  Twitter is peerless in its current, to the moment sensing of what is going on in the world and the ease with which connections happen.  Leadership + social, however, moves slowly, as attested by the CEO of HootSuite.  HootSuite has been my favorite twitter management tool, by the way.  

 

Leader reluctance to fully understand the impact and usefulness of social media may be to their company's detriment, via new findings released by McKinsey as well as learning which big companies are investing in social now.


___________________________

   

Social technologies [can] free up expertise trapped in departmental silos. High-skill workers can now be tapped company-wide

___________________________


Excerpts:

 

Among CEOs of the world’s Fortune 500 companies, a mere 20 have Twitter accounts. Larry Ellison, the Oracle CEO, by the way, hasn’t tweeted since.

 

A new report from McKinsey Global Institute, however, makes yet another business case for social media:

  

According to an analysis of 4,200 companies by the business consulting giant, social technologies stand to unlock from $900 billion to $1.3 trillion in value.   At the high end, that approaches Australia’s annual GDP.   Two-thirds of the value ...rests in “improved communications and collaboration within and across enterprises...”     Any human interaction in the workplace can be "socialized"--endowed with the speed, scale, and disruptive economics of the Internet.

 

___________________________

   

In the last year...Google, Microsoft, Salesforce, Adobe and even Oracle, spent about $2.5 billion snatching up social media tools.
___________________________

  

...R&D teams brainstorm products, HR vets applicants, sales fosters leads, and operations ...forecasts and monitors supply chains.

  

Social technologies [can] free up expertise trapped in departmental silos. High-skill workers can now be tapped company-wide.

  

...social sharing translates to a productivity windfall as "enterprise information becomes accessible and searchable, rather than locked up as ‘dark matter’ in inboxes.”

 

In the last year, the world’s largest enterprise software companies--Google, Microsoft, Salesforce, Adobe, and even Ellison’s own Oracle--have spent upward of $2.5 billion snatching up social media tools to add to their enterprise suites.

 

Even Twitter-phobic CEOs may have a hard time ignoring that business case.

 

Read the full article by Author Ryan Holmes, the CEO of HootSuite here.  Hootsuite is a social media management system with 4 million users, including 79 of the Fortune 100 companies.


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“Double Down” Women, Leaders & Careers, Kudos and Ire » You Can't Have it All?

“Double Down” Women, Leaders & Careers, Kudos and Ire » You Can't Have it All? | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"The executive work/life dilemma for women and men includes Steve Jobs' contributions while seriously ill - a provocative thought piece by the Glass Hammer."

 

Change leaders are culture leaders. The American leader work ethic for women and men is featured here, in controversy about growing leaders, both women and men. It's a long term, evolving change & leadership issue with shifting impact for both genders. ~ Deb

 

Excerpts:  

 

There’s increasing polarization on the subject of how to handle work-life’s ever-escalating challenges for women.

   

___________________________

   

“Work-life balance is not some nice idea that isn’t achievable or important. It is important to all of us for sustainable mental and physical health & well-being. The key word is sustainable.”

___________________________


The friction is visible in the varied media responses to news that incoming Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer will be the first female CEO to take the top spot while pregnant, and to Anne-Marie Slaughter’s controversial cover story for The Atlantic, Why Women Still Can’t Have It All.

 

Part of the dilemma revolves around a concept coined by Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s COO: “leaning in” versus “leaning back.”

Sandberg describes how failing to “lean in” inadvertently leads many women to leave the workforce:

“Women almost never make one decision to leave the workforce,” said Sandberg. ...Maybe it’s the last year of med school when they say, I’ll take a slightly less interesting specialty because I’m going to want more balance one day. Maybe it’s the fifth year in a law firm when they say, I’m not even sure I should go for partner, because I know I’m going to want kids eventually. ...And from that moment, they start quietly leaning back. The problem is, often they don’t even realize it.”     “During the last years of his life, [Steve Jobs] created the iPhone, the iPad, he was moving into television.  ...He was very sick...in the last years of life when he didn’t have time.”

  

“Work-life balance is not some nice idea that isn’t achievable or important. It is important to all of us for sustainable mental and physical health and well-being. The key word is sustainable, ” says Teri Johnson.  

 

She suggests the analogy a long distance runner versus a relay racer.

 

“Any of us can push hard in a relay, but the distance runner knows to pace herself, to make rest days as important as training days and to take excellent care of herself to avoid injury. She saves the real push for the race, when it is important.”

   

Read the full post here.

 

Photo credit:  JD Hancock


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Committing to Feedback on the Specifics: How Senior Leaders Actually Can Change

Committing to Feedback on the Specifics:  How Senior Leaders Actually Can Change | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

Senior executives have a bottleneck in the "doing" of change.  Specifics targeting of what to change make all the difference.

 

Jumping through the Knowing-Doing Gap is key - referencing Jeffrey Pfeffer and Robert I Sutton, authors of a book by the same name.

.

Excerpts:

 

Scott Keller talks about research findings for the book, Beyond Performance, and says most executives don't see themselves as part of the problem. 

.

He says that most people also have an unwarranted optimism in relation to their own behavior. …In many behavior-related areas, human beings consistently think they are better than they are — a phenomenon referred to in psychology as a "self-serving bias." 

 

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Whereas conventional change management approaches surmise that top team role modeling is a matter of will or skill, the inconvenient truth is that the real bottleneck to role modeling is knowing what to change at a personal level.

 

 

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Typically, insight into what to change can be created by concrete 360-degree feedback techniques, either via surveys, conversations or both. This 360-degree feedback should not be against generic HR leadership competency models, but should instead be against the specific behaviors related to the desired changes that will drive business performance. 

 

.

Three Examples:

Amgen CEO Kevin Sharer uses the approach of asking each of his top 75, "What should I do differently?" and sharing his development needs and commitment publicly with them. 

.

 

A top team of a national insurance company routinely uses a "circle of feedback" during their change program: Every participant receives feedback live in the room, directly from their colleagues on "What are your strengths?" in relation to "being the change" as well as "Where can you improve?" 

 

.

A leadership coalition (top 25) of a multi-regional bank who, after each major event in their change program, conducted a short, targeted 360-degree feedback survey regarding how well their behaviors role-modeled the desired behaviors during the event, ensuring that feedback was timely, relevant and practical.

 

The full post is here.


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Managing Leadership Change: the Transition to a Social Business, New Experts May Emerge

Managing Leadership Change: the Transition to a Social Business, New Experts May Emerge | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"What's working in social business in 2012? Tech sales, marketing and the speakers circuits are doing well. Implementation and organizational change are lagging behind.  New leader & experts may be emerging in the gap."

 

There's helpful context in this piece in understanding social business in 2012, now that social media is becoming mainstream.   Transparency reigns.  Traditional organizational structures will not be able to keep up.

 

Excerpts:

 

______________________

 

...new leaders and experts may emerge, as it takes different leadership and an understanding of networks to support a social business.

______________________

 

 

...Pervasive connectivity changes organizational power structures, though the full effects of this take time to become visible. From a transparent environment new leaders and experts may emerge, as it takes different leadership and an understanding of networks to support a social business.

 

...Interconnected people and interlinked information flows, and these will bypass established structures and services. Work gets more democratic as it becomes visible to all.

 

Agile social businesses need people who can work in concert on solving problems, not waiting for direction from above. Management must ask: how can we help you work in this transparent environment? 

 

______________________

 

Changing to more social behaviors takes time, but most of all, it takes trust.

______________________

 

 

In social networks we often learn from each other; modelling behaviors, telling stories and sharing what we know.  While not highly efficient, this is very effective for learning.

 

There is a need to model the new behaviors of being transparent and narrating one’s work.

 

Social business also requires power-sharing; for how long will workers collaborate and share if they cannot take action with their new knowledge and connectivity?

 

Changing to more social behaviors takes time, but most of all, it takes trust.

 

Once social technologies have been installed, modelling new work behaviors becomes the main organizational challenge.

 

Sources:   By @hjarche via @charlesjennings


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Russell Goldsmith of City National, on Storytelling’s Power in a Powerful, Positive Culture

Russell Goldsmith of City National, on Storytelling’s Power in a Powerful, Positive Culture | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

The power of a story to teach, reinforce culture, and reward behavior, is central for how this bank executive leads at City National Bank in Los Angeles.

 

This reminds me of the power of the story by consulting colleague, Dr. Rick Fenwick, of Fenwick-Koller Associates.  We recently completed another round of Team Concept training for the UAW workers at GM Powertrain.  Our 4 day session is nuanced by story, Rick's colorful examples as well as stories shared by team members, learning about managing team experiences, including tools to help.

 

Goldsmith's example below embeds recognition and reward of the story into the culture of City National Bank.

 

 

Excerpt:

Russell Goldsmith is chairman and chief executive of City National Bank in Los Angeles. In its “Story Idol” competition, he says, employees talk about “what they did that promoted teamwork or helped a client by going the extra mile.”

 

_____________________________

 

We [taught] people how to share stories [including] something called “Story Idol,” and every quarter there’s a competition...

_____________________________

 

 

...we have a lot of great stories to tell. If you look up City National, one of the stories you will see is the story of Frank Sinatra’s son who was kidnapped. The first C.E.O., Al Hart, was a real friend of Frank Sinatra’s and famously opened the vault on a Saturday and got the ransom money. That happened in the early ’60s, but people are still telling that story. It’s a source of pride.

 

We brought in consultants to teach people how to share stories in a more organized way that underscored the culture. We do something called “Story Idol,” and every quarter there’s a competition among our 79 offices.

 

It’s a way to give colleagues a pat on the back and a moment in the sun for doing the right thing, and it democratizes and decentralizes positive reinforcement.

 

_____________________________

 

...what matters most is the recognition, and the respect from your peers as you stand on the stage in front of 300 people.

_____________________________

 

The people who submit the winning stories [Story Idol competition] all get iPads. The winners themselves ...get significant cash awards. But what matters most is the recognition, and the respect from your peers as you stand on the stage in front of 300 people.

 

Read the full post via the New York Times by author ADAM BRYANT here.

 

===

 

Thanks to my change colleague, Liz Guthridge, @LizGuthridge, for the heads up. If you have a change leader that merits a look via this curation stream, let me know via DebNystrom@Reveln.com or suggest it as a curation post in ScoopIt.

 

More about us, on the Fenwick Koller Associates team with Reveln Consulting is here.


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Accessible Leadership: Why the CEO needs to drive communication & culture change to improve customer experience

Accessible Leadership: Why the CEO needs to drive communication & culture change to improve customer experience | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it
Leadership Required: Why the CEO needs to drive communication and culture change to improve customer experience.

 

A simple but not simplistic 3 point list of a leader's role in communicating with all hands in culture change. From Experience Required™

 

Excerpted:

 

 

The CEO’s role must be one of brand champion...[to] ensure that the company’s brand strategy is implemented, instead of becoming just another “thing” that everyone should do.

 

Here are three things leaders can start to do today to ensure greater success:

 

#1. Be visible.
Employees need to see you (literally) leading the effort ...[to] know that you truly believe in its value and its impact. Get out and develop relationships with your employees. ...[and] hear what’s really going on from those that directly interact with your customers.

 

#2. Give feedback regularly.
Recognize employees often with specific feedback on what they did well. Help them connect to the purpose and how their individual efforts fit in with the big picture.

 

Giving their work greater meaning helps them realize they’re working for a company they can be proud of. 

 

#3. Demonstrate quick wins.
Make it a point to regularly update employees on progress. Show them how their feedback led to actionable improvements in process, employee, and customer experiences.

 

You have to walk the talk and show you’re prepared to make changes that improve the experience. Once your employees realize their input is valued, they’ll open up more and be more motivated to follow your example.


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Sustainability is about Impact! The Double Bottom Line > Letting Go to Let Come

Sustainability is about Impact!  The Double Bottom Line > Letting Go to Let Come | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"It's the double bottom line, baby!  ESPECIALLY if you are in non-profit leadership today."

  

I just heard Jeanne Bell, CEO and author of NonProfit Sustainability talk honestly about the double bottom line in her own business as well as in her consulting engagements.  Her fresh, tested perspective rings true.

  

In a nutshell:

  

...in the mythic past it was possible to think first about strategic impact goals, and then about how to raise the money. ...today...you can't talk about what you're going to do without talking about how to get the money. And, you can't talk about how to get money without talking about what you're going to do.    _______________________
  
Cultivate direction, identify sacred cows. Name it. CHANGE it. _______________________      Here are some gems from her presentation today in Flint, Michigan as well as a great Scooped article by her.  Flint is an appropriate setting; it's a place that has seen hard times and where the BEST Funders Collaborative brings in stellar talent to keep non-profits doing what they do best.       Declare change as constant. Model change by turning down money not headed in the right direction.  We have some agency over this – don’t have to jump to funders. " Cultivate direction, identify sacred cows. Name it. CHANGE it. Use good tools, frameworks. DO NOT confuse strategy and planning.    _______________________
     What is sustainable today may be unsustainable tomorrow. _______________________             Excerpted gems from the article:     If the financial goal in a for-profit company is to maximize profit, should our goal as a nonprofit be to have $0 profit? Or should the goal be to grow an endowment of $10 million, or to have a surplus of 5%, or a deficit of no more than $50,000?       The financial goal of a nonprofit is to ensure that it has adequate working capital; that is, its financial goal is to have enough money to do its work over the long term. Today we often use the term sustainability...        What is sustainable today may be unsustainable tomorrow. ...We never arrive at a mix of programs and revenue streams that can be described as permanently sustainable. But we can always be heading in the right direction.        Photo above:  Jeanne Bell, Steve Zimmerman and Jan Masaoka (left to right in photo) are all former nonprofit CFOs and they all appreciate the environmental aspects of sustainability as well. Jeanne is now CEO of CompassPoint Nonprofit Services.     Read more here.        Now I'm hearing Paul Saginaw, co-founder of the very successful Zingermans community of businesses in Ann Arbor talk about founding Food Gatherers, feeding the hungry in Ann Arbor.  Quite the point.
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Leadership Challenges: Embrace paradoxes to move forward

Leadership Challenges: Embrace paradoxes to move forward | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"This provocative post highlights current business paradoxes challenging leaders:  change or remain stable, complexity versus simplicity, growth and sustainability and more."


After seeing evidence of our increasingly VUCA world, one that is growing in its Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous characteristics, this useful list of paradoxes resonates.  Does it resonate to your experience?

 

___________________________

  

Leaders must find ways to deal with this complexity and embrace and manage it to achieve simplicity.

___________________________

   


Excerpted:

  

Paradox 1: growth versus sustainability

Growth as it is currently defined tends to result in an unquestioned and unchecked consumption of resources. Sustainability considerations are generally considered to put a major strain on growth ambitions.


The way forward is innovation, but another paradox present itself:

  

Paradox 2: innovating versus operating

Innovation is increasingly about service, process, business model and social innovation.

However, focusing on innovation does not mean ignoring operations. The trick is that what allows operations to thrive can seriously get in the way of innovation and vice versa.

  

Paradox 3:  change versus continuity

If you try to innovate too many things at once you will end up with chaos, if you do not change at all your organisation will decline. What is the right balance?

  

Paradox 4: collaboration versus competition

Business is inherently competitive yet today, collaboration is common, with most companies having collaborated with their suppliers and their customers. Leading companies are promoting collaboration through crowdsourcing or with competitors.

  

Paradox 5: complexity versus simplicity

Demands on leaders result in increasing levels of complexity, arising from the number of possible, unpredictable interactions between collaborate, compete; change, remain stable; innovation or operational excellence; growth or sustainability. Leaders must find ways to deal with this complexity and embrace and manage it to achieve simplicity.

  

Paradox 6: Heart versus mind

Decisions need to be made in the face of incomplete analysis, unpredictable outcomes and changing circumstances. The foundations for analysis and factual arguments differ from emotional and visionary engagement; people who excel at one are not necessarily particularly good at the other and yet both are needed.

  

Read the full article by Dr Bettina von Stamm here.


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Cautionary Change Leader Tales: Seven Habits of Spectacularly Unsuccessful Executives | Forbes

Cautionary Change Leader Tales:  Seven Habits of Spectacularly Unsuccessful Executives | Forbes | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

Sydney Finkelstein, the Steven Roth Professor of Management at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College, published “Why Smart Executives Fail” 8 years ago.

 

 

In it, he shared some of his research on what over 50 former high-flying companies – like Enron, Tyco, WorldCom, Rubbermaid, and Schwinn – did to become complete failures. It turns out that the senior executives at the companies all had 7 Habits in common. Finkelstein calls them the Seven Habits of Spectacularly Unsuccessful Executives.

.............

 

They are also cautionary tales for currently unbeatable firms like Apple (AAPL), Google (GOOG), and Amazon.com (AMZN).

 

Consider the change implications and hubris of these traits:

 

Habit # 1: They see themselves and their companies as dominating their environment    

 

Habit #2: They identify so completely with the company that there is no clear boundary between their personal interests and their corporation’s interests

 

Habit #3: They think they have all the answers

 

Habit #4: They ruthlessly eliminate anyone who isn’t completely behind them

 

.............. 


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Cultural awareness 80% of Change Management Success, Lean Change, Internationally

Cultural awareness 80% of Change Management Success, Lean Change, Internationally | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

Culture consciousness and people management present challenges greater than those related to cost trimming when implementing change, via Lebanese-born Dr. Joe Khoury.

  

Deep change expertise, communication & inclusion in goal achievement lean process is key to this review. ~  Deb

 

Excerpted:

 

__________________

 

...people were working 12- to 13-hour days unnecessarily – they were, after all, only paid for eight.

 

__________________

   

Dr. Khoury was one of three engineers lined up to relate success stories of lean principles’ implementation.

 

“Never underestimate the importance of culture,” Dr. Khoury cautioned.  "...Understanding your people will take you a long way towards reaching your lean goals.”

 

__________________

   

Through ...illustrating where teams were at in reaching their targets ...people were able to take corrective action sooner.

__________________

   

Dr. Khoury and others from the wider Methode family, including former manager Edward Chetcuti, now a lean adviser and coach, devised the VAVE (value added, value engineering) process to deliver value more efficiently.

 

The process was implemented successfully in China, where labor costs are traditionally lower, and later in the US.

 

The team also created customized software, able to provide a snapshot of the movements of major contributors to raw material cost. The software was later patented.

 

In Mr. Chetcuti earlier project, he examined behavior and processes and found that people were working 12- to 13-hour days unnecessarily – they were, after all, only paid for eight.

 

__________________

 

   

“Information must be cascaded so that everyone within the organisation is aware of the goals,” ~ Antoine Bonello

 

_________________________

 

After classroom training & simulation, Mr Chetcuti and the team took the principles to the shopfloor. People learned to see waste and took ownership of the mission to reduce it and to get things right first time.

 

Through ...illustrating where teams were at in reaching their targets ...people were able to take corrective action sooner. Creative flow of value to the customer began soon after the company stabilised. Within eight months, profits improved significantly.

  
“Information must be cascaded so that everyone within the organisation is aware of the goals,” Betfair’s global head of process improvement Antoine Bonello, explained.

 

   

“We expect people to learn by themselves, but even in the best companies, employees can score very low on knowledge of what they are doing. Value engineering prevents mistakes from being replicated. ”

 

Read the full article here.


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To Supercharge Growth, Start By Tearing Down Silos, Case: IRIS International

To Supercharge Growth, Start By Tearing Down Silos, Case:  IRIS International | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"How IRIS International treated its toxic company culture to achieve dramatic growth."

Learn How IRIS International became a company that is setting the bar in innovation, collaboration, and growth.

Excerpts:

When César García came to IRIS International 10 years ago, the company was on the ropes. The manufacturer of medical diagnostic products had a stale product line, flat revenues, and mounting debt.

_______________

 

Annual revenue [lept] from $28 million in 2002 to $118 million last year.

_______________

   

 

García welcomed the challenge of a turnaround and in 2003, he became president and CEO of IRIS (International Remote Imaging Systems). He brought in a new management team. Secured debt refinancing. Pushed hard for new product development.

But García quickly concluded that the real problem was IRIS’s toxic company culture. It was a culture that kept its employees locked in silos and prevented the organization from seizing external opportunities.

The transformation at IRIS under García’s leadership has been extraordinary. The company has launched 15 new products in the last 10 years. Annual revenue has leaped from $28 million in 2002 to $118 million last year, with $129 million projected for 2012. 


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Change leadership investment pays off in big income boost, case study

Change leadership investment pays off in big income boost, case study | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"Change success:  Putting leadership development at the heart of a major operations-improvement effort paid off in BIG boost in income for a global industrial company."

 

Once again, a smart leadership investment pays off during a major change implementation boosting income by about $1.5 billion a year.

 

Excerpts from the case example:

 

Too often senior executives overlook the “softer” skills their leaders will need to disseminate changes throughout the organization and make them stick. These skills include:

keeping managers and workers inspired when they feel overwhelmed,  promoting collaboration across organizational boundaries,  helping managers embrace change programs through dialogue, not dictation ______________________________ The senior team had to look beyond technical improvements and focus on helping the company’s leaders... ______________________________
In this case example, drives for improvement carried a stigma of incompetence, current performance was considered “good enough”, and conflict tended to be passive-aggressive.  There was also a pervasive fear of making mistakes—reinforced by the company’s strong culture of safety and of risk aversion.

The senior team had to look beyond technical improvements and focus on helping the company’s leaders to master the personal behavioral changes needed to support the operational ones.

 

The company mounted an intense, immersive, and individualized leadership program.  The results are still unfolding, but after three years the company estimates that the improvement program has already boosted annual pretax operating income by about $1.5 billion a year. Furthermore, executives see the new leadership behavior as crucial to that ongoing success.

 

Read the full story here.


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Leading in a VUCA change world - Are you ready for the volatile, uncertain, complex & ambiguous?

Leading in a VUCA change world - Are you ready for the volatile, uncertain, complex & ambiguous? | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"How’s your leadership working on in your VUCA world (Volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous)? "

 

Liz Guthridge has written a great post on leading in a VUCA world; VCUA stands for volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous, a term coined by the US Army War College in the weeks before September 11, 2001.  

 

Liz & I discussed the need for collaboration and community across disciplines to succeed in a VUCA world in connection with our recent panel + Open Space presentation we did for a global change conference on Success Secrets of Trusted Change Advisors.

 

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VUCA can provide threats [and] offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.” ~ Dr. Bob Johansen

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Here are some excerpts of her take on the insightful presentation by one of our keynote presenters:

 

"Leading in a VUCA world" is a popular phrase with Bob Johansen, a distinguished fellow and former president of Institute for the Future.

 

According to Dr. Johansen, who shared his 2020 forecast at the Association of Change Management Professionals global conference this week, our VUCA world is not going away. In fact it’s just going to spin faster during the next decade.

 

In his talk “External Future Forces That Will Disrupt the Practice of Change Management,” Dr. Johansen noted that VUCA is not necessarily doom and gloom. While VUCA can provide threats, it also can offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.”

 

As for his two big 2022 predictions for organizational change agents, they are:

 

1. “The digital natives (now 16 years or younger) will create new practices to make change through gaming.” (The other key phrase besides gaming in this sentence is “make.” Dr. Johansen predicts that a culture of makers will drive the next generation of change. And as a result, leaders need to show the “maker instinct” trait.)

 

2. “Reciprocity-based innovation will focus on the economic, social and psychological value of reciprocity.” (Two important traits for leaders are smart-mob organizing and commons creating. Think Creative Commons.)

 

Dr. Johansen challenged the 825 of us in attendance to figure out how to help people and organizations adapt to these changes and others.

 

To do this, we should watch our terms and our questions.  Read Liz's full post here.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Tom Hood's curator insight, April 6, 2013 2:16 PM

We just covered this in our townhall this past Monday. Arelene Thomas (AICPA/CGMA) talked about VUCA related to CPAs in Biz/Industry.


VUCA can provide threats [and] offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.” ~ Dr. Bob Johansen

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 6, 2013 2:26 PM

We need to consider VUCA