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If you lead them, they will follow!
Traits today's leaders "must have" to survive and lead without self-destructing
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Being Leader-ish: When You’re Not Quite a Leader

Being Leader-ish: When You’re Not Quite a Leader | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it
  ish. This is the word we use when something is stuck between being and not being. Between is and is not. For example, we might say, ...

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donhornsby's curator insight, October 25, 2013 4:02 AM

(From the article): Every leader, at one time or another, has probably done something leader-ish. Because leadership is not always easy, and sometimes we instinctively seek convenience.

 

But true character-based leadership emerges through discomfort. Ours, and others. It requires focusing our attention on how we can make others shine. Making mindful judgment calls. Getting things done through others, and winning their hearts and minds in the process. Handling people as unique individuals. Looking beyond our positions to the behaviors and choices that are best for our employees, for the team, for the organization, and its customer.

 

Are you a leader, or leader-ish?

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, October 26, 2013 2:47 PM

Every leader, at one time or another, has probably done something leader-ish. Because leadership is not always easy, and sometimes we instinctively seek convenience.

Zian Peak's curator insight, May 6, 7:29 AM

Now there is a word for those inbetweeners-  'Leader-ish'.  

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Yahoo's Marissa Mayer Is No Fool

Yahoo's Marissa Mayer Is No Fool | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"Like any good leader, she knows who creates real value, and how, in her company." She's seen and is acting on the performance results.

___________________

...she was predisposed to consider physical (co)presence as essential to digital innovation success...

___________________

 

Blog author Michael Schrage says,

 

"Mayer's Google background (and impact) suggested that she was predisposed to consider physical (co)presence as essential to digital innovation success as computational/design brilliance.

 

…the Googleplex for its employees wasn't health food benevolence, it was to keep people on campus working together."


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 5, 2013 1:27 PM

This is an opposing view to the last ScoopIt post.    Seven (7) months is still a short term view in light of this HBR blogger's view that Ms. Mayer is on the right track.


Previous culture can also be a blind spot.  One culture's success does not always paste onto another's key needs.

Change colleague Liz Guthridge, who specializes in change communication, suggests that leaders Avoid “taser” asks to get others to act, referencing Mayer's style of communicating the change.  I tend to agree with Liz.  Yet, there are bigger issues than communication mistakes.    


Time will tell.  ~ Deb

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Adapting to Change, Leader Lessons From Jeff Weiner, CEO of LinkedIn - Forbes

Adapting to Change, Leader Lessons From Jeff Weiner, CEO of LinkedIn - Forbes | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

Jeff’s leadership style keeps the company focused on growing at the rate of two new members every second  while reducing the business mantra to just two words: “Next Play.”


Leadership lessons lists abound on-line.  Jeff's list of 10 lessons, however, is tied to a large, successful virtual platform company with real staying power, connected to jobs and career growth - LinkedIn.  


He's obviously trending in the right direction as his inspires his "Next Plays" among his staff.  ~  Deb


Excerpts:


_____________________________

Today, 16 months after the LinkedIn IPO, employees continue to talk about their Next Play and stay focused on delivering results.

_____________________________


Weiner described how powerful the phrase, "Next Play" has been for the company.

 

On the day LinkedIn became a public company, employees received a black T shirt with the company’s name and stock ticker written across the front and Next Play emblazoned on the back of the shirt. Even today 16 months after the LinkedIn IPO, employees continue to talk about their Next Play and stay focused on delivering results.
1) Define leadership : At LinkedIn, Leadership is the ability to inspire others and achieve shared results. ...to create economic opportunity for the 3.3 billion people in the global workplace by matching skills with job opportunities.
3) Prioritize your business goals: ...if we could only do one thing, what would it be? This is a lesson Weiner learned from Steve Jobs and practices every day. 

6) Customers first: ... anytime the LinkedIn product team considers new enhancements the first question revolves around: Is this putting our members first, or is this putting the company first? “If it benefits members, it will ultimately benefit the company.


7) Remember To laugh: ...Weiner says he values his team members’ sense of humor and sometimes, on a tough day, that can trump their talent and expertise!


Read the full post here.


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, September 19, 2012 8:42 PM
Thanks Lynn!
Manish Puranik's curator insight, July 9, 2013 9:25 PM

Few more lessons on Leadership...!

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Elite Leadership Tweets and the $1.3 Trillion Price Of Not Tweeting At Work -

Elite Leadership Tweets and the $1.3 Trillion Price Of Not Tweeting At Work - | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"Recently, the CEO of Oracle, one of the largest and most advanced computer tech corporations in the world, tweeted for the very first time and joined a club that remains surprisingly elite."


DN:  Twitter is peerless in its current, to the moment sensing of what is going on in the world and the ease with which connections happen.  Leadership + social, however, moves slowly, as attested by the CEO of HootSuite.  HootSuite has been my favorite twitter management tool, by the way.  

 

Leader reluctance to fully understand the impact and usefulness of social media may be to their company's detriment, via new findings released by McKinsey as well as learning which big companies are investing in social now.


___________________________

   

Social technologies [can] free up expertise trapped in departmental silos. High-skill workers can now be tapped company-wide

___________________________


Excerpts:

 

Among CEOs of the world’s Fortune 500 companies, a mere 20 have Twitter accounts. Larry Ellison, the Oracle CEO, by the way, hasn’t tweeted since.

 

A new report from McKinsey Global Institute, however, makes yet another business case for social media:

  

According to an analysis of 4,200 companies by the business consulting giant, social technologies stand to unlock from $900 billion to $1.3 trillion in value.   At the high end, that approaches Australia’s annual GDP.   Two-thirds of the value ...rests in “improved communications and collaboration within and across enterprises...”     Any human interaction in the workplace can be "socialized"--endowed with the speed, scale, and disruptive economics of the Internet.

 

___________________________

   

In the last year...Google, Microsoft, Salesforce, Adobe and even Oracle, spent about $2.5 billion snatching up social media tools.
___________________________

  

...R&D teams brainstorm products, HR vets applicants, sales fosters leads, and operations ...forecasts and monitors supply chains.

  

Social technologies [can] free up expertise trapped in departmental silos. High-skill workers can now be tapped company-wide.

  

...social sharing translates to a productivity windfall as "enterprise information becomes accessible and searchable, rather than locked up as ‘dark matter’ in inboxes.”

 

In the last year, the world’s largest enterprise software companies--Google, Microsoft, Salesforce, Adobe, and even Ellison’s own Oracle--have spent upward of $2.5 billion snatching up social media tools to add to their enterprise suites.

 

Even Twitter-phobic CEOs may have a hard time ignoring that business case.

 

Read the full article by Author Ryan Holmes, the CEO of HootSuite here.  Hootsuite is a social media management system with 4 million users, including 79 of the Fortune 100 companies.


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“Double Down” Women, Leaders & Careers, Kudos and Ire » You Can't Have it All?

“Double Down” Women, Leaders & Careers, Kudos and Ire » You Can't Have it All? | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"The executive work/life dilemma for women and men includes Steve Jobs' contributions while seriously ill - a provocative thought piece by the Glass Hammer."

 

Change leaders are culture leaders. The American leader work ethic for women and men is featured here, in controversy about growing leaders, both women and men. It's a long term, evolving change & leadership issue with shifting impact for both genders. ~ Deb

 

Excerpts:  

 

There’s increasing polarization on the subject of how to handle work-life’s ever-escalating challenges for women.

   

___________________________

   

“Work-life balance is not some nice idea that isn’t achievable or important. It is important to all of us for sustainable mental and physical health & well-being. The key word is sustainable.”

___________________________


The friction is visible in the varied media responses to news that incoming Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer will be the first female CEO to take the top spot while pregnant, and to Anne-Marie Slaughter’s controversial cover story for The Atlantic, Why Women Still Can’t Have It All.

 

Part of the dilemma revolves around a concept coined by Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s COO: “leaning in” versus “leaning back.”

Sandberg describes how failing to “lean in” inadvertently leads many women to leave the workforce:

“Women almost never make one decision to leave the workforce,” said Sandberg. ...Maybe it’s the last year of med school when they say, I’ll take a slightly less interesting specialty because I’m going to want more balance one day. Maybe it’s the fifth year in a law firm when they say, I’m not even sure I should go for partner, because I know I’m going to want kids eventually. ...And from that moment, they start quietly leaning back. The problem is, often they don’t even realize it.”     “During the last years of his life, [Steve Jobs] created the iPhone, the iPad, he was moving into television.  ...He was very sick...in the last years of life when he didn’t have time.”

  

“Work-life balance is not some nice idea that isn’t achievable or important. It is important to all of us for sustainable mental and physical health and well-being. The key word is sustainable, ” says Teri Johnson.  

 

She suggests the analogy a long distance runner versus a relay racer.

 

“Any of us can push hard in a relay, but the distance runner knows to pace herself, to make rest days as important as training days and to take excellent care of herself to avoid injury. She saves the real push for the race, when it is important.”

   

Read the full post here.

 

Photo credit:  JD Hancock


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Russell Goldsmith of City National, on Storytelling’s Power in a Powerful, Positive Culture

Russell Goldsmith of City National, on Storytelling’s Power in a Powerful, Positive Culture | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

The power of a story to teach, reinforce culture, and reward behavior, is central for how this bank executive leads at City National Bank in Los Angeles.

 

This reminds me of the power of the story by consulting colleague, Dr. Rick Fenwick, of Fenwick-Koller Associates.  We recently completed another round of Team Concept training for the UAW workers at GM Powertrain.  Our 4 day session is nuanced by story, Rick's colorful examples as well as stories shared by team members, learning about managing team experiences, including tools to help.

 

Goldsmith's example below embeds recognition and reward of the story into the culture of City National Bank.

 

 

Excerpt:

Russell Goldsmith is chairman and chief executive of City National Bank in Los Angeles. In its “Story Idol” competition, he says, employees talk about “what they did that promoted teamwork or helped a client by going the extra mile.”

 

_____________________________

 

We [taught] people how to share stories [including] something called “Story Idol,” and every quarter there’s a competition...

_____________________________

 

 

...we have a lot of great stories to tell. If you look up City National, one of the stories you will see is the story of Frank Sinatra’s son who was kidnapped. The first C.E.O., Al Hart, was a real friend of Frank Sinatra’s and famously opened the vault on a Saturday and got the ransom money. That happened in the early ’60s, but people are still telling that story. It’s a source of pride.

 

We brought in consultants to teach people how to share stories in a more organized way that underscored the culture. We do something called “Story Idol,” and every quarter there’s a competition among our 79 offices.

 

It’s a way to give colleagues a pat on the back and a moment in the sun for doing the right thing, and it democratizes and decentralizes positive reinforcement.

 

_____________________________

 

...what matters most is the recognition, and the respect from your peers as you stand on the stage in front of 300 people.

_____________________________

 

The people who submit the winning stories [Story Idol competition] all get iPads. The winners themselves ...get significant cash awards. But what matters most is the recognition, and the respect from your peers as you stand on the stage in front of 300 people.

 

Read the full post via the New York Times by author ADAM BRYANT here.

 

===

 

Thanks to my change colleague, Liz Guthridge, @LizGuthridge, for the heads up. If you have a change leader that merits a look via this curation stream, let me know via DebNystrom@Reveln.com or suggest it as a curation post in ScoopIt.

 

More about us, on the Fenwick Koller Associates team with Reveln Consulting is here.


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The End of "Results Only" at Best Buy, Theory X Returns?

The End of "Results Only" at Best Buy, Theory X Returns? | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"Best Buy CEO Hubert Joly axes flexible work. the original "Results-Only Work Environment" and why it is worse news than Yahoo's remote-worker roundup."  

That is, if this Theory X style change ends up being  judged as short-sighted leadership decision.

 

Excerpts via Professor Monique Valcour's post :

 

Best Buy's flexible work program is ...the groundbreaking Results Only Work Environment (ROWE), one of the most innovative and celebrated examples of a company redesigning work to focus on results and boost performance through motivation-enhancing trust and autonomy.

_______________________

     
"In a turnaround transformation, you need to feel disposable as opposed to indispensable."

 

_______________________

 

     

The ROWE method has since been implemented in more than 40 companies.

 

The culture of work-life support in a company is the most powerful predictor of employee work-life balance as well as a key element in job performance, organizational commitment, and intention to remain with the company.

But top management exerts the strongest influence on culture...

 

 

CEO Joly made a very revealing comment following an investors' meeting in November.

 

"In a turnaround transformation, you need to feel disposable as opposed to indispensable." 
He is far from the only "Theory X" leader who believes that stressing employees makes them perform better. 
This underlying belief persists despite enormous research evidence to the contrary ...
Related posts by Deb:There’s No Such Thing as Leadership? Pull, Influence and “Open Space” vs. Power   Change Leaders: Why Should Anyone Trust Your Vision? John Kotter & Harvard Business Review   Control Issues in Teams: How Do You Take Charge?
Photo by by matteson.norman


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Bad move. We shall see!

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 9, 2013 1:40 PM
  • This provocative piece on ending flex work arrangements provides YIN to the YANG of change leadership watch.  We can watch to see what happens next at Best Buy on how effective this is in turning things around or, perhaps putting an end to things.  ~  D
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, March 9, 2013 8:19 PM
Indeed, Robin. Science is not on their side, CEOs Joly & Mayer.
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Trending Down for years: Yahoo Investors Need to Worry About Marissa Mayer

Trending Down for years:  Yahoo Investors Need to Worry About Marissa Mayer | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"By fighting trends, like telecommuting, Ms. Mayer's focus on tactics further damages Yahoo - which desperately needs a CEO with vision to create a new strategy."


Excerpts:

 

__________________

Yahoo has been a struggling company for several years.

__________________

 

...Yahoo has lacked an effective strategy for a decade.  ..It has no technology advantage, no product advantage and no market advantage.  It is so weak in all markets that its only value has been as a second competitor that keeps the market leader from being attacked as a monopolist!

 

A series of CEOs have been unable to develop a new strategy for Yahoo to make it more like Amazon or Apple and less like – well, Yahoo. 

 

...Ms. Mayer was brought into the flailing company from Google, which is a market leader, to turn around Yahoo.  But she’s been on the job 7 months, and there still is no apparent strategy to return Yahoo to greatness.

 

Related posts by Deb:


 There’s No Such Thing as Leadership? Pull, Influence and “Open Space” vs. Power     Status Quo Shakedown Meets Right Action

   

Knowledge, Passion & Power: 3 Simple Change Principles to Release It

 


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 4, 2013 9:11 AM

Yahoo's spotlight in the news seems to now be a cautionary tale about how not to change. 


Mayer's success at Google seems as if it is not translating into vision and right action (first steps), even after 7 months, at Yahoo.

Leadership IS about followers and inspiration to adapt.  Yahoo seems to have chosen conventional communication (email) as well as traditional management techniques in a company that seems more and more old school in adapting to change. 


If nothing else, Yahoo, note, the medium is the message, a quote from Marshall McLuhan.

~  Deb 

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Leadership Challenges: Embrace paradoxes to move forward

Leadership Challenges: Embrace paradoxes to move forward | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"This provocative post highlights current business paradoxes challenging leaders:  change or remain stable, complexity versus simplicity, growth and sustainability and more."


After seeing evidence of our increasingly VUCA world, one that is growing in its Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous characteristics, this useful list of paradoxes resonates.  Does it resonate to your experience?

 

___________________________

  

Leaders must find ways to deal with this complexity and embrace and manage it to achieve simplicity.

___________________________

   


Excerpted:

  

Paradox 1: growth versus sustainability

Growth as it is currently defined tends to result in an unquestioned and unchecked consumption of resources. Sustainability considerations are generally considered to put a major strain on growth ambitions.


The way forward is innovation, but another paradox present itself:

  

Paradox 2: innovating versus operating

Innovation is increasingly about service, process, business model and social innovation.

However, focusing on innovation does not mean ignoring operations. The trick is that what allows operations to thrive can seriously get in the way of innovation and vice versa.

  

Paradox 3:  change versus continuity

If you try to innovate too many things at once you will end up with chaos, if you do not change at all your organisation will decline. What is the right balance?

  

Paradox 4: collaboration versus competition

Business is inherently competitive yet today, collaboration is common, with most companies having collaborated with their suppliers and their customers. Leading companies are promoting collaboration through crowdsourcing or with competitors.

  

Paradox 5: complexity versus simplicity

Demands on leaders result in increasing levels of complexity, arising from the number of possible, unpredictable interactions between collaborate, compete; change, remain stable; innovation or operational excellence; growth or sustainability. Leaders must find ways to deal with this complexity and embrace and manage it to achieve simplicity.

  

Paradox 6: Heart versus mind

Decisions need to be made in the face of incomplete analysis, unpredictable outcomes and changing circumstances. The foundations for analysis and factual arguments differ from emotional and visionary engagement; people who excel at one are not necessarily particularly good at the other and yet both are needed.

  

Read the full article by Dr Bettina von Stamm here.


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There is no such thing as leadership – Peter Drucker classic, Change Leadership?

There is no such thing as leadership – Peter Drucker classic, Change Leadership? | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

Wes Balda has written a compelling piece on Peter Drucker and our overwrought attention to defining leadership, which is timely, seeing the new Pew report on negative media and presidental election coverage.

 

Excerpts:


At lunch one day, [Wes] asked Peter to define leadership. He snorted in response, “There is no such thing as leadership.”

 

He defended this by claiming it couldn’t be defined. He stressed that leaders were only labeled thus because they had followers.

 

“At best, leadership may be a dimension of management,” he said, “and leaders could be identified because their actions were predictable, or perhaps trustworthy.”

_________________________


Leading could be how we manage, or make knowledge effective through relationships, in powerless environments.
_________________________

 

 

...Max DePree identified an important concept – the absence of power. Leading could be how we manage, or make knowledge effective through relationships, in powerless environments.


Results are achieved around or beyond the use of power. “Leading without power” may be the only way leadership works. By definition, then, using power in leading is not leading at all.

 

DN:  Perhaps it's just coercion, or intimidation.  From another article excerpted here, from Forbes, note the diagrammed split of leadership and management tools and the placement of "power tools."


So, when Drucker says leaders are only defined by the presence of followers, I believe he means that these followers first exist – and that they are absolutely free from all constraints in choosing to follow.


A well known video on being the first follower helps illustrate this point.

 

Power is absent, and the decision to follow creates the ultimate democracy. (Drucker, incidentally, was even more focused on civil society after Sept. 11, 2001.)


Read the full article here.

 

Photo credit:  by Jeff McNeill, Flickr.com CC


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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 6, 2012 6:28 AM
In any organization, there will always be leaders and followers. It is true that many people hate the fact that they are just simple followers, the main reason why they often time make nasty comments about these leaders.But, despite all these negative comments, a true leader should never be onion-skinned, and should stand firm on what he believes is right and advantageous for the majority, regardless of any negative opinions.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, September 10, 2012 6:54 AM
@Victoria, thanks for your comment. It is true that "leaders" must have thick skins. Drucker's point, I believe, is that followers define the leaders, and that leaders may, in many, even most cases be an artifact of management, rather than the magical status we've given them over the years.

Indeed, where would Gandi, Nelson Mandela, Washington and Lincoln be without their first followers and the followings that emerged to turn the tides of public opinion to make significant changes in our histories.

It's a provocative article and I'm glad that people are rescooping it. ~ Deb
Erika Holthuizen's comment, September 25, 2012 6:58 PM
golden truth
!
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Social Business Culture is winning in the Competitive High Tech Business, Change Leader

Social Business Culture is winning in the Competitive High Tech Business, Change Leader | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"Social business culture wins again in the competitive high tech world, with collaboration and tremendous employee and client loyalty to prove it."

   

This is one of the smarter change/culture pieces of read recently, with good stats and means.  It's a Forbes piece on collaborative culture by Christine Comaford, contributor.  Here collaboration is NOT a myth or buzz word,  rather it appears to be in full practice and working quite well, thank you!  ~  Deb

   

Excerpts:

   

Stats on Enterasys:  One of the fastest growing networking companies in high tech:

 

Produced 3 years of consecutive top-line year-over-year revenue growth Grown 25% of sales from new customers Had less than 5% annual employee attrition Has a Net Promoter Score of 81 – NPS score is not a typo     Their tools used include Salesforce.com’s Chatter, Twitter, Facebook to accelerate business via connection & collaboration.     

_________________________

   

A ‘social’ executive sponsor must be S.O.C.I.A.L. – sincere, open, collaborative, interested, authentic and likeable.

   

_________________________

   

Vala Afshar, Enterasys’ Chief Customer Officer says it is because the company is a social enterprise featuring their collaborative and customer focused culture thriving in this highly competitive market.

   

Samples of the tenents of their culture building & sustaining:

   

1. Define a meaningful purpose

    

Social collaboration is not about social media. It is about the purpose of collaboration and execution. A strong culture is based on tenants of transparency, accountability, execution velocity, and mass collaboration.

   

2. Ensure simplicity and user experience

   

Key:  social technology selection criterion must be “ease of use” for both the employee and customer experience => highly dependent on seamless integration, ease of use, and alignment to existing workflows.

   

3. Have a ‘social’ executive sponsor

   

The executive must be S.O.C.I.A.L. – sincere, open, collaborative, interested, authentic and likeable. The executive sponsor must be actively engaged and enthusiastically willing to promote inter-departmental collaboration. Influence and likeability are key success factors.

   

_________________________

  

[Don't] force collaboration, [instead offer] encouragement and invitation to growth.

   

_________________________

   

6. Create social collaboration functional groups

   

Pre-establish a group representing various functions - a social collaboration team, including a Social ELT members (marketing, sales, services, IT, engineering – extended leadership team), who represent various functions, can do this at the beginning. Within lines of business, it is more likely that employees will collaborate.

 

Once comfortable collaborating internally, connections will begin to establish outside the lines of business.

   

8. Measure adoption

   

Celebrate and recognize power collaborators and how they are positively impacting business objectives. Recognize the most followed, the most posts and even potential for training opportunities. [Don't] force collaboration, instead offer encouragement and invitation to growth.

   

10. Passionately embrace change and have fun

  

Social collaboration is ...most of all it is about enjoying the people your work with and the work that you do. Have fun growing mindshare and your business.

    

Source:  http://www.forbes.com/sites/christinecomaford/2012/06/19/if-you-are-not-social-you-will-shrink-10-steps-to-becoming-a-social-business/

 

 


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UnConventional ~ Josh James, CEO, Hiring the Underqualified & Angry, Learning on the Job

UnConventional ~ Josh James, CEO, Hiring the Underqualified & Angry, Learning on the Job | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

Josh James, Founder and CEO of Domo; Author of Startup Rules responds to ~ The Case for Hiring “Under Qualified" by digging deeper into his hiring philosophy & success.  He's also the all-star executive who also co-founded Omniture and took it from inception to IPO to sale for $1.8B to Adobe

 

Assessments don't catch what Josh James is talking about, the renegades, the untested, as well as the angry ones who have something to prove.  In that light, Josh James proves how one of his rules shows the limits of the others. - Deb

______________________________

  

#45:  No Unemployed Candidates. Always an Excuse. Too Risky. Top-Rated, currently employed candidates who won’t leave… PERFECT.”

______________________________


Excerpts:

Josh James's response to "Dave, Dave, Dave..." in Forbes focusing on his Rule 45: "No Unemployed Candidates. Always an Excuse. Too Risky. Top-Rated, Currently Employed Candidates Who Won’t Leave… PERFECT.”

______________________________

 

...a handful of my executives ...had been fired from their previous job. They were so angry and motivated to prove the world wrong...that I couldn’t resist.

______________________________

 

I’ve always believed that hiring people with untapped potential can serve as a tremendous accelerant to your business. This is something I learned very early on in my career and has been a staple of my hiring and promoting decisions throughout the course of running my businesses. 

______________________________

  

...hire orphans, picked-on people, or people who have been fired for that exact reason—they are motivated...

______________________________

 

[However], if you were faced with hiring 10 employees who were terminated for one reason or another, or hiring 10 employees who were top-rated, currently employed individuals who didn’t want to initially even interview, then I think the latter group would prove to contain dramatically more successful individuals 90% of the time.

That said, a handful of my executives at Omniture who had been fired from their previous job.  

They were so angry and motivated to prove the world wrong (another one of my rules: hire orphans, picked-on people, or people who have been fired for that exact reason—they are motivated), that I couldn’t resist.  


...We have an obligation to the rest of our employees and their families to ensure we have a world-class, globally competitive company.  In order to do that, I want to stack the cards in our favor as much as possible.  Capitalism isn’t always nice.

If you look at my other rules, (DN:  In his list of 55 Start-Up Rules) you’ll notice number 46:

  

There are exceptions to every rule and to the extent you make the exceptions, you accept greater risk, but you can also receive greater reward.  

   
In that vein, my startup rule number 20 (also found at http://www.joshjames.com) speaks to that, about hiring the underprivileged and undeserved, who, although they haven’t had the best chances yet, they have the gumption, desire, and enthusiasm and are just waiting for the right person to believe in them.

Half of my management team at Omniture and already half of the leaders who have received promotions at Domo are people who were or are learning on the job.  

We are chock full of people whom I have my eye on and who are killing it in their positions. 

They will deserve and receive promotions down the road despite their lack of a been-there-done-that resume. They have the intangibles.  (DN: That don't show up on assessments, necessarily.)

And by the way, we’re hiring.  - Josh James


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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