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If you lead them, they will follow!
Traits today's leaders "must have" to survive and lead without self-destructing
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Leadership Lesson: The Difference Between Google and Apple

Leadership Lesson: The Difference Between Google and Apple | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

Google and Apple - what makes for innovation and what are the lessons learned?

 

...Google could have made the decision to stay solely focused on search, but they had the foresight to move beyond the certainty of what is to pursue new opportunity by focusing on what if.

 

Apple on the other hand, while once the leading innovator in their space, has ceded that position to other more aggressive players like Samsung, HTC , and yes, Google.

 

Where Apple went wrong is they began to confuse version releases and feature improvements with innovation.  


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 17, 2013 4:29 PM

How innovation wasn't, via Mike Myatt, at Apple vs. Google.  Interesting take worth a look.  ~  D

Ante Lauc's curator insight, May 18, 2013 2:56 AM

I would like that a new firm create their synthesis.

Denize Piccolotto Carvalho's curator insight, May 20, 2013 11:15 AM

Interesting...

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Why Apple, Academia, Tesla & VCs May Die, Disruption Guru Christensen Talks

Why Apple, Academia, Tesla & VCs May Die, Disruption Guru Christensen Talks | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"Harvard business professor Clayton Christensen literally wrote the book on technology disruption...and he thinks Apple, Tesla Motors, venture capitalists and most of the nation’s colleges and universities should be afraid."

  

The author of The Innovator’s Dilemma said Wednesday that all of them could be killed by less advanced competitors in the same way that many once dominant technology companies have been in the past.

  

...He believes that and the commoditization of smartphones threaten Apple in the long run.

  

...“For 300 years, higher education was not disruptable because there was no technological core."

  

“But now online learning brings to higher education this technological core, and people who are very complacent are in deep trouble.'

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...people who are very complacent are in deep trouble.

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...“there is a different business model that is disrupting this in addition to online learning. It’s on-the-job education. ...you come in for a week and we’ll teach you about strategy and you go off and develop a strategy.  


...You learn it and you use it. These are very different business models and that’s what’s killing us.”


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 11, 2013 11:50 AM

I've posted this to BOTH Change Leader Watch & here.  On the Innovations & Institutions stream, I'll be adding examples of organizations that are adapting to this disruption in academe and the other industries mentioned.  ~  Deb

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, February 17, 2013 4:30 PM
Thanks for your comments Marie. Knowledge Management is quite an industry, with various opinions of the traction it holds in business. I am most curious as to where it is headed.
Patrick J Scanlon's curator insight, March 12, 2013 5:58 PM

If you don't like change.  You will like irrelevance even less #media #higherEd #VC

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How to Build the 100-Year Company - Michigan Steelcase, Ideas & Endless Innovation

How to Build the 100-Year Company - Michigan Steelcase, Ideas  &  Endless Innovation | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"Steelcase, the long-time maker of innovative workplace furniture, celebrated its 100th anniversary this year, and defines itself not as an office furniture company, rather as a company of ideas."

 

Catch a company that does it right.  Besides IBM and several other rare centarians, Steelcase stands out, in Michigan, in particular.

 

Excerpted:

 

The 100-year company is the rarest of all organizations in Corporate America – a survivor of multiple business cycles, the appearance of radically disruptive technologies and the changing tastes of entirely different generations.

 

In Michigan. Steelcase, doesn't define itself as an office furniture company, but rather, as a company of ideas:

 

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"Companies don't survive for a century, ideas do."

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(Fittingly, Steelcase is a sponsor of the TED Conference). The company, which began by making steel metal wastebaskets back in 1912, thrived during the great post-war Baby Boomer work generation that saw the transition to fixed workplaces and the rise of the modern cubicle worker.

 

Jim Hackett, the CEO of Steelcase, uses a deceptively simple idea to guide the company in this transition to a new mobile economy. He refers to this Big Idea as the movement from the "I/Fixed" paradigm to the "We/Mobile" paradigm.

 

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Steelcase is no longer selling products, it is selling experiences.

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Companies are shifting away from fixed office environments to mobile, collaborative workforces and flexible workspace arrangements that go beyond desks and chairs.

 

One of the company's recently launched product lines is media:scape, which is essentially a blend of furniture and technology to create collaborative workplace environments. At a certain level, Steelcase is no longer selling products, it is selling experiences.

 

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how [will] mobile change everything about your industry?

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So how do you build the next 100-year company? You first need to ask yourself how the ascendance of mobile will change everything about your industry.

 

Just as Steelcase got its start making metal wastebaskets, the next 100-year-company may be currently engaged in the creation of something so mundane, yet so practical, that we may not know how to recognize it yet as a future innovator.

 

Read the full post here.


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Faster and more creative when solving OTHER people's problems

Faster and more creative when solving OTHER people's problems | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it
Recent research reveals that people are more capable of mental novelty when thinking on behalf of others than for themselves.

 

Great piece on enriching the field of view and other perspectives, something we also encourage in executive coaching.  

 

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...abstract thinking leads to greater creativity. ...But in our businesses and our lives, we often do the opposite.

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Excerpts:

 

Over the years, social scientists have found that abstract thinking leads to greater creativity. That means that if we care about innovation we need to be more abstract and therefore more distant. But in our businesses and our lives, we often do the opposite. We intensify our focus rather than widen our view. We draw closer rather than step back.

 

That's a mistake, Polman and Emich suggest. "That decisions for others are more creative than decisions for the self... should prove of considerable interest to negotiators, managers, product designers, marketers and advertisers, among many others," they write.

 

Dan Pink's suggestions, excerpted:

  

• Recruit more independent directors.   Begin with corporate governance. 

~ having independent directors on the boards of public companies. 

 

• Rethink the structure of your firm.

Perhaps loose alliances of distantly connected people

 

• Harness the power of peers.

....assemble a small group of peers – all from different industries – and gather periodically to exchange ideas and offer solutions from new perspectives.

 

• Find a problem-swapping partner.

Find a friend or colleague with whom you can occasionally swap problems...

 

• Disasssociate yourself.

Imagine you're doing it for someone else...

 

Full article here


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Yahoo's Marissa Mayer Is No Fool

Yahoo's Marissa Mayer Is No Fool | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"Like any good leader, she knows who creates real value, and how, in her company." She's seen and is acting on the performance results.

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...she was predisposed to consider physical (co)presence as essential to digital innovation success...

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Blog author Michael Schrage says,

 

"Mayer's Google background (and impact) suggested that she was predisposed to consider physical (co)presence as essential to digital innovation success as computational/design brilliance.

 

…the Googleplex for its employees wasn't health food benevolence, it was to keep people on campus working together."


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 5, 2013 4:27 PM

This is an opposing view to the last ScoopIt post.    Seven (7) months is still a short term view in light of this HBR blogger's view that Ms. Mayer is on the right track.


Previous culture can also be a blind spot.  One culture's success does not always paste onto another's key needs.

Change colleague Liz Guthridge, who specializes in change communication, suggests that leaders Avoid “taser” asks to get others to act, referencing Mayer's style of communicating the change.  I tend to agree with Liz.  Yet, there are bigger issues than communication mistakes.    


Time will tell.  ~ Deb

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Why Innovation Dies, Disruption, not Deans: Higher Ed's long, winding Road to Online Education, Forbes

Why Innovation Dies, Disruption, not Deans: Higher Ed's long, winding Road to Online Education, Forbes | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

Here's the companion post to the previous article that features the long & winding road in dealing with online education, and confronts disruption head-on.

 

Author:  Steve Blank   Source:  http://www.forbes.com/sites/groupthink/2012/05/01/why-innovation-dies/2/


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Improvisation May Be the Key to Successfully Managing Change, MIT

Improvisation May Be the Key to Successfully Managing Change, MIT | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"Key attributes for almost any organization, and SO CHALLENGING to implement: agility , flexibility, improvisation – a company’s ability to quickly change is crucial to its long-term success."

 

 MIT's Leadership Center weighs in via an article by professor Wanda J. Orlikowski that equates a successful company to an orchestra.   Yes, I've heard this before.  Benjamin Zander is quite compelling in his leadership videos on this very note, pun intended.

 

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...to allow for improvisation, CEOs need to release some control and allow employees to experiment.
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What is helpful in the article is yet another example of "letting go" as in, "sometimes, however, the conductor needs to let go and let its skilled and creative musicians lead."  Well now, MIT, yes.  And Orpheus, the conductor-less orchestra, has taught us as much.  Releasing "some control" as quoted below, is the magic sauce, in my opinion, and adding in some feedback and perspective, on lessons learned, is a part of it.

 

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"sometimes, however, the conductor needs to let go and let its skilled and creative musicians lead."

 

Yes, Orpheus, the conductor-less orchestra, has taught us as much. 

 

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It is always, helpful, however to review suggestions for how to create and sustain an agile, flexible, improvisational culture.  

 

Here are Orlikowski's tips for creating such an organization, excerpted:

 

Plan to improvise - sometimes you can anticipate change, and if you can do that, you should plan to address that change in a flexible way Adapt when you cannot foresee – as business rules are changing, adapt and test on a smaller, departmental scale before making company-wide changes Create a learning environment – encourage communication between your employees in different locations and departments, push everyone to learn from each other Encourage flexibility – to allow for improvisation, CEOs need to release some control and allow employees to experiment Improvise today for success tomorrow – create a culture of experimentation and improvisation even when you’re not experiencing extreme change in practice for when you do need to change

 

 

A companion article and video to this one is how Asst. Professor Steve Leybourne, Boston University experiences improv connected with the finance industry, creating a model and citing risk, reward in managers who surreptitiously improvise.   In his video, you'll see evidence of the "let go of micromanaging" and still how it is tentative in corporate culture.  It seems we have a long way to go to let go, but writing about those who research it is a start.  

 

Source:  http://www.scoop.it/t/innovation-institutions-will-it-blend/p/1715217458/moving-beyond-surreptitious-manager-improv-risk-reward-emerging-best-practice-in-your-org-steve-leybourne

 

What is your experience with creating a culture that is agile , flexible, and especially improvisational?

 

 

Photo credit:   ePi.Longo  Article source:  Chief Executive Magazine


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Leading in a VUCA change world - Are you ready for the volatile, uncertain, complex & ambiguous?

Leading in a VUCA change world - Are you ready for the volatile, uncertain, complex & ambiguous? | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"How’s your leadership working on in your VUCA world (Volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous)? "

 

Liz Guthridge has written a great post on leading in a VUCA world; VCUA stands for volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous, a term coined by the US Army War College in the weeks before September 11, 2001.  

 

Liz & I discussed the need for collaboration and community across disciplines to succeed in a VUCA world in connection with our recent panel + Open Space presentation we did for a global change conference on Success Secrets of Trusted Change Advisors.

 

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VUCA can provide threats [and] offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.” ~ Dr. Bob Johansen

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Here are some excerpts of her take on the insightful presentation by one of our keynote presenters:

 

"Leading in a VUCA world" is a popular phrase with Bob Johansen, a distinguished fellow and former president of Institute for the Future.

 

According to Dr. Johansen, who shared his 2020 forecast at the Association of Change Management Professionals global conference this week, our VUCA world is not going away. In fact it’s just going to spin faster during the next decade.

 

In his talk “External Future Forces That Will Disrupt the Practice of Change Management,” Dr. Johansen noted that VUCA is not necessarily doom and gloom. While VUCA can provide threats, it also can offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.”

 

As for his two big 2022 predictions for organizational change agents, they are:

 

1. “The digital natives (now 16 years or younger) will create new practices to make change through gaming.” (The other key phrase besides gaming in this sentence is “make.” Dr. Johansen predicts that a culture of makers will drive the next generation of change. And as a result, leaders need to show the “maker instinct” trait.)

 

2. “Reciprocity-based innovation will focus on the economic, social and psychological value of reciprocity.” (Two important traits for leaders are smart-mob organizing and commons creating. Think Creative Commons.)

 

Dr. Johansen challenged the 825 of us in attendance to figure out how to help people and organizations adapt to these changes and others.

 

To do this, we should watch our terms and our questions.  Read Liz's full post here.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Tom Hood's curator insight, April 6, 2013 5:16 PM

We just covered this in our townhall this past Monday. Arelene Thomas (AICPA/CGMA) talked about VUCA related to CPAs in Biz/Industry.


VUCA can provide threats [and] offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.” ~ Dr. Bob Johansen

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 6, 2013 5:26 PM

We need to consider VUCA