Committing to Feedback on the Specifics:  How Senior Leaders Actually Can Change | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

Senior executives have a bottleneck in the "doing" of change.  Specifics targeting of what to change make all the difference.

 

Jumping through the Knowing-Doing Gap is key - referencing Jeffrey Pfeffer and Robert I Sutton, authors of a book by the same name.

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Excerpts:

 

Scott Keller talks about research findings for the book, Beyond Performance, and says most executives don't see themselves as part of the problem. 

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He says that most people also have an unwarranted optimism in relation to their own behavior. …In many behavior-related areas, human beings consistently think they are better than they are — a phenomenon referred to in psychology as a "self-serving bias." 

 

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Whereas conventional change management approaches surmise that top team role modeling is a matter of will or skill, the inconvenient truth is that the real bottleneck to role modeling is knowing what to change at a personal level.

 

 

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Typically, insight into what to change can be created by concrete 360-degree feedback techniques, either via surveys, conversations or both. This 360-degree feedback should not be against generic HR leadership competency models, but should instead be against the specific behaviors related to the desired changes that will drive business performance. 

 

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Three Examples:

Amgen CEO Kevin Sharer uses the approach of asking each of his top 75, "What should I do differently?" and sharing his development needs and commitment publicly with them. 

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A top team of a national insurance company routinely uses a "circle of feedback" during their change program: Every participant receives feedback live in the room, directly from their colleagues on "What are your strengths?" in relation to "being the change" as well as "Where can you improve?" 

 

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A leadership coalition (top 25) of a multi-regional bank who, after each major event in their change program, conducted a short, targeted 360-degree feedback survey regarding how well their behaviors role-modeled the desired behaviors during the event, ensuring that feedback was timely, relevant and practical.

 

The full post is here.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN