If you lead them, they will follow!
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If you lead them, they will follow!
Traits today's leaders "must have" to survive and lead without self-destructing
Curated by Robin Martin
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Rescooped by Robin Martin from Talent and Performance Development
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Peer Performance Reviews - Reviewed

Peer Performance Reviews - Reviewed | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it
Some companies are doing away with traditional top-down, manager-led performance reviews and relying on the rank-and-file for employee evaluations.

 

The system provides more valuable information about each worker's performance than a review by just one person would, Mr. Garrity says. That's particularly true at Hearsay Social, because it has very few formal managers, most employees work across multiple teams, and leadership changes from project to project.

 

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"We are decentralizing as much decision making as we can, so we also need to decentralize reviews..." 

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"We are decentralizing as much decision making as we can, so we also need to decentralize reviews," says Steve Garrity, the chief technology officer.  at Hearsay Social Inc., a San Francisco-based social-media software company with some 90 employees.

 

But the process, which the firm plans to do twice a year, is also time-consuming and complicated, he says, and it may not work as the employee count grows. 

 

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...crowdsourced feedback may not provide better data....feedback may gravitate toward positive and negative extremes...

 

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...Crowdsourced evaluations go a step beyond traditional 360-degree reviews, which are generally more structured and often involve lengthy surveys.   

 

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 "...Another potential downside is "rating fatigue" and lower quality information..."

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But critics argue that crowdsourced feedback may not provide better data. Like online restaurant or product reviews, feedback may gravitate toward positive and negative extremes, says Tracy Maylett, chief executive of DecisionWise.   ...Another potential downside is "rating fatigue" and lower quality information, he adds.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Robin Martin's insight:

Just think of how productive and beneficial this could be for a small team. After all, no one knows more about a team member better than another member of the team! 

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 14, 2013 2:57 PM

Assessing the "why" of these processes are key.  For example, the goals of peer review may fit the type of work that happens in  team oriented cultures of a certain size.  360 feedback is also best for newer to mid-level managers, open to development.  ~  D

David Hain's curator insight, July 16, 2013 4:11 AM

Fascinating experiment - hope it works!

Rescooped by Robin Martin from Change Leadership Watch
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Change leadership investment pays off in big income boost, case study

Change leadership investment pays off in big income boost, case study | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"Change success:  Putting leadership development at the heart of a major operations-improvement effort paid off in BIG boost in income for a global industrial company."

 

Once again, a smart leadership investment pays off during a major change implementation boosting income by about $1.5 billion a year.

 

Excerpts from the case example:

 

Too often senior executives overlook the “softer” skills their leaders will need to disseminate changes throughout the organization and make them stick. These skills include:

keeping managers and workers inspired when they feel overwhelmed,  promoting collaboration across organizational boundaries,  helping managers embrace change programs through dialogue, not dictation ______________________________ The senior team had to look beyond technical improvements and focus on helping the company’s leaders... ______________________________
In this case example, drives for improvement carried a stigma of incompetence, current performance was considered “good enough”, and conflict tended to be passive-aggressive.  There was also a pervasive fear of making mistakes—reinforced by the company’s strong culture of safety and of risk aversion.

The senior team had to look beyond technical improvements and focus on helping the company’s leaders to master the personal behavioral changes needed to support the operational ones.

 

The company mounted an intense, immersive, and individualized leadership program.  The results are still unfolding, but after three years the company estimates that the improvement program has already boosted annual pretax operating income by about $1.5 billion a year. Furthermore, executives see the new leadership behavior as crucial to that ongoing success.

 

Read the full story here.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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