If you lead them,...
Follow
Find tag "culture"
1.9K views | +0 today
If you lead them, they will follow!
Traits today's leaders "must have" to survive and lead without self-destructing
Curated by Robin Martin
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Talent and Performance Development
Scoop.it!

Peer Performance Reviews - Reviewed

Peer Performance Reviews - Reviewed | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it
Some companies are doing away with traditional top-down, manager-led performance reviews and relying on the rank-and-file for employee evaluations.

 

The system provides more valuable information about each worker's performance than a review by just one person would, Mr. Garrity says. That's particularly true at Hearsay Social, because it has very few formal managers, most employees work across multiple teams, and leadership changes from project to project.

 

___________________

"We are decentralizing as much decision making as we can, so we also need to decentralize reviews..." 

___________________

 

"We are decentralizing as much decision making as we can, so we also need to decentralize reviews," says Steve Garrity, the chief technology officer.  at Hearsay Social Inc., a San Francisco-based social-media software company with some 90 employees.

 

But the process, which the firm plans to do twice a year, is also time-consuming and complicated, he says, and it may not work as the employee count grows. 

 

___________________


...crowdsourced feedback may not provide better data....feedback may gravitate toward positive and negative extremes...

 

___________________

 

 

 

...Crowdsourced evaluations go a step beyond traditional 360-degree reviews, which are generally more structured and often involve lengthy surveys.   

 

___________________

 

 

 "...Another potential downside is "rating fatigue" and lower quality information..."

___________________

 

 

But critics argue that crowdsourced feedback may not provide better data. Like online restaurant or product reviews, feedback may gravitate toward positive and negative extremes, says Tracy Maylett, chief executive of DecisionWise.   ...Another potential downside is "rating fatigue" and lower quality information, he adds.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Robin Martin's insight:

Just think of how productive and beneficial this could be for a small team. After all, no one knows more about a team member better than another member of the team! 

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 14, 2013 11:57 AM

Assessing the "why" of these processes are key.  For example, the goals of peer review may fit the type of work that happens in  team oriented cultures of a certain size.  360 feedback is also best for newer to mid-level managers, open to development.  ~  D

David Hain's curator insight, July 16, 2013 1:11 AM

Fascinating experiment - hope it works!

Rescooped by Robin Martin from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

Yahoo's Marissa Mayer Is No Fool

Yahoo's Marissa Mayer Is No Fool | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"Like any good leader, she knows who creates real value, and how, in her company." She's seen and is acting on the performance results.

___________________

...she was predisposed to consider physical (co)presence as essential to digital innovation success...

___________________

 

Blog author Michael Schrage says,

 

"Mayer's Google background (and impact) suggested that she was predisposed to consider physical (co)presence as essential to digital innovation success as computational/design brilliance.

 

…the Googleplex for its employees wasn't health food benevolence, it was to keep people on campus working together."


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 5, 2013 1:27 PM

This is an opposing view to the last ScoopIt post.    Seven (7) months is still a short term view in light of this HBR blogger's view that Ms. Mayer is on the right track.


Previous culture can also be a blind spot.  One culture's success does not always paste onto another's key needs.

Change colleague Liz Guthridge, who specializes in change communication, suggests that leaders Avoid “taser” asks to get others to act, referencing Mayer's style of communicating the change.  I tend to agree with Liz.  Yet, there are bigger issues than communication mistakes.    


Time will tell.  ~ Deb

Rescooped by Robin Martin from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

High Quality Connections, Short, Deeply Fortifying, Dr. Jane Dutton Video

High Quality Connections, Short, Deeply Fortifying, Dr. Jane Dutton Video | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"People are more instantaneously alive in healthy in High Quality Connections."


Listen here (brief 4 min. video) as Professor Jane Dutton unlocks the importance of high quality connections and four ways how to make them.  


It is NOT the same as developing positive relationships.


Dr. Dutton is a co-founder of the Univ. of Michigan's Ross Business Schools growing domain of expertise called Positive Organizational Scholarship www.bus.umich.edu/Positive. ;

Her past research has explored processes of organizational adaptation, focusing on how strategic issues are interpreted and managed in organizations, as well as issues of organizational identity and change.

 

Imagine the impact on a culture if this became a people investment value.


Photo credit:  http://www.erb.umich.edu/


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 8, 2013 10:43 AM

Moving attention from negative deviance to positive deviance (as there is MUCH research on failure and what doesn't work) is what brings this resource to a change leadership watch listing instead of change management resources.

From the first time that I've met Jane Dutton, I've been struck by her openness and deep focus on the scholarship of high quality connections and the impacts they have within organizations.  

A chapter on the subject is here:  High Quality Connections

Let me know what you think.  ~  Deb 

Rescooped by Robin Martin from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

Cultural awareness 80% of Change Management Success, Lean Change, Internationally

Cultural awareness 80% of Change Management Success, Lean Change, Internationally | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

Culture consciousness and people management present challenges greater than those related to cost trimming when implementing change, via Lebanese-born Dr. Joe Khoury.

  

Deep change expertise, communication & inclusion in goal achievement lean process is key to this review. ~  Deb

 

Excerpted:

 

__________________

 

...people were working 12- to 13-hour days unnecessarily – they were, after all, only paid for eight.

 

__________________

   

Dr. Khoury was one of three engineers lined up to relate success stories of lean principles’ implementation.

 

“Never underestimate the importance of culture,” Dr. Khoury cautioned.  "...Understanding your people will take you a long way towards reaching your lean goals.”

 

__________________

   

Through ...illustrating where teams were at in reaching their targets ...people were able to take corrective action sooner.

__________________

   

Dr. Khoury and others from the wider Methode family, including former manager Edward Chetcuti, now a lean adviser and coach, devised the VAVE (value added, value engineering) process to deliver value more efficiently.

 

The process was implemented successfully in China, where labor costs are traditionally lower, and later in the US.

 

The team also created customized software, able to provide a snapshot of the movements of major contributors to raw material cost. The software was later patented.

 

In Mr. Chetcuti earlier project, he examined behavior and processes and found that people were working 12- to 13-hour days unnecessarily – they were, after all, only paid for eight.

 

__________________

 

   

“Information must be cascaded so that everyone within the organisation is aware of the goals,” ~ Antoine Bonello

 

_________________________

 

After classroom training & simulation, Mr Chetcuti and the team took the principles to the shopfloor. People learned to see waste and took ownership of the mission to reduce it and to get things right first time.

 

Through ...illustrating where teams were at in reaching their targets ...people were able to take corrective action sooner. Creative flow of value to the customer began soon after the company stabilised. Within eight months, profits improved significantly.

  
“Information must be cascaded so that everyone within the organisation is aware of the goals,” Betfair’s global head of process improvement Antoine Bonello, explained.

 

   

“We expect people to learn by themselves, but even in the best companies, employees can score very low on knowledge of what they are doing. Value engineering prevents mistakes from being replicated. ”

 

Read the full article here.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

To Supercharge Growth, Start By Tearing Down Silos, Case: IRIS International

To Supercharge Growth, Start By Tearing Down Silos, Case:  IRIS International | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"How IRIS International treated its toxic company culture to achieve dramatic growth."

Learn How IRIS International became a company that is setting the bar in innovation, collaboration, and growth.

Excerpts:

When César García came to IRIS International 10 years ago, the company was on the ropes. The manufacturer of medical diagnostic products had a stale product line, flat revenues, and mounting debt.

_______________

 

Annual revenue [lept] from $28 million in 2002 to $118 million last year.

_______________

   

 

García welcomed the challenge of a turnaround and in 2003, he became president and CEO of IRIS (International Remote Imaging Systems). He brought in a new management team. Secured debt refinancing. Pushed hard for new product development.

But García quickly concluded that the real problem was IRIS’s toxic company culture. It was a culture that kept its employees locked in silos and prevented the organization from seizing external opportunities.

The transformation at IRIS under García’s leadership has been extraordinary. The company has launched 15 new products in the last 10 years. Annual revenue has leaped from $28 million in 2002 to $118 million last year, with $129 million projected for 2012. 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

Leadership Teams: Success Factors! Where Teamwork Thrives in the Money Management Industry

Leadership Teams:  Success Factors! Where Teamwork Thrives in the Money Management Industry | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

Factors that truly differentiate top firms. It's the leader teams!

Recently, the Focus Consulting Group surveyed more than 100 asset management firms around the world, testing both for the strength of their cultures and for the effectiveness of their leadership teams....

 

Excerpts:

 

Of the investment professionals we surveyed, fully 94% agree with the statement: "Culture is important to our firm's success." Why do they think so? For them, the key benefit is "effective decision making." Both are interesting findings from an industry often seen as celebrating lone geniuses and superstars.

 

The same "elite" six firms that demonstrated superior cultures also posted senior leadership teamwork scores that are significantly higher than average. In particular, they distinguished themselves from the rest of the investment industry on five dimensions.

 

Source:  http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2012/04/where_teamwork_thrives_in_the.html?awid=9186393578493521766-3271

 

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from The Science and Art of Motivation
Scoop.it!

FINALLY, Scrapping Performance Appraisals for What Motivates!

FINALLY, Scrapping Performance Appraisals for What Motivates! | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it
Something big is going on. More and more companies have decided to radically change their performance appraisal process.



...Adobe, Juniper, Kelly Services, and a variety of other companies ...have decided to do away with traditional performance ratings and dramatically change the annual appraisal process.

Excerpts

 

The new keys to success:

 

Develop a “feedback-rich” culture and set of tools (often online, sometimes formal, often informal) that encourages all employees to give each other feedback.      Talk about performance regularly and let employees create their own goals on a regular basis.    [Ensure] managers provide ongoing feedback and teach them how to have honest conversations.    Assume that employees already know something about their own performance, and [help them] them self-assess. ...That starts the dialogue about expectations and the match between their self-assessment and that of the organization.
Related posts by Deb:
Creator, Challenger, Coach through Change: Getting out of the Drama  The Impact of a Challenging Goal, Parasailing in Key West              Change, Innovators, Creativity and Community, Will it Blend?


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 6, 2013 8:15 AM

IS this slow moving change finally taking hold?!  From a Chris Lee article on problematic appraisal in the 90's ot Coen's & Jenkins "Abolishing Appraisals" book in 2002, finally the death bell may be ringing.


More than a decade later, there is hope for corporations abandoning this deeply flawed corporate millstone in exchange for a healthier, feedback rich and goal/challenge driven culture.   ~  Deb

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 10, 2013 10:58 AM

It's time for performance management to fade and for positive talent development systems to move forward.  As an example of this, Skillrater.com has arrived on the scene, integrated into social media and positive feedback practices.  More news and scoops to follow.  ~  Deb

Rescooped by Robin Martin from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

Trending Down for years: Yahoo Investors Need to Worry About Marissa Mayer

Trending Down for years:  Yahoo Investors Need to Worry About Marissa Mayer | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"By fighting trends, like telecommuting, Ms. Mayer's focus on tactics further damages Yahoo - which desperately needs a CEO with vision to create a new strategy."


Excerpts:

 

__________________

Yahoo has been a struggling company for several years.

__________________

 

...Yahoo has lacked an effective strategy for a decade.  ..It has no technology advantage, no product advantage and no market advantage.  It is so weak in all markets that its only value has been as a second competitor that keeps the market leader from being attacked as a monopolist!

 

A series of CEOs have been unable to develop a new strategy for Yahoo to make it more like Amazon or Apple and less like – well, Yahoo. 

 

...Ms. Mayer was brought into the flailing company from Google, which is a market leader, to turn around Yahoo.  But she’s been on the job 7 months, and there still is no apparent strategy to return Yahoo to greatness.

 

Related posts by Deb:


 There’s No Such Thing as Leadership? Pull, Influence and “Open Space” vs. Power     Status Quo Shakedown Meets Right Action

   

Knowledge, Passion & Power: 3 Simple Change Principles to Release It

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 4, 2013 9:11 AM

Yahoo's spotlight in the news seems to now be a cautionary tale about how not to change. 


Mayer's success at Google seems as if it is not translating into vision and right action (first steps), even after 7 months, at Yahoo.

Leadership IS about followers and inspiration to adapt.  Yahoo seems to have chosen conventional communication (email) as well as traditional management techniques in a company that seems more and more old school in adapting to change. 


If nothing else, Yahoo, note, the medium is the message, a quote from Marshall McLuhan.

~  Deb 

Rescooped by Robin Martin from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

Adapting to Change, Leader Lessons From Jeff Weiner, CEO of LinkedIn - Forbes

Adapting to Change, Leader Lessons From Jeff Weiner, CEO of LinkedIn - Forbes | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

Jeff’s leadership style keeps the company focused on growing at the rate of two new members every second  while reducing the business mantra to just two words: “Next Play.”


Leadership lessons lists abound on-line.  Jeff's list of 10 lessons, however, is tied to a large, successful virtual platform company with real staying power, connected to jobs and career growth - LinkedIn.  


He's obviously trending in the right direction as his inspires his "Next Plays" among his staff.  ~  Deb


Excerpts:


_____________________________

Today, 16 months after the LinkedIn IPO, employees continue to talk about their Next Play and stay focused on delivering results.

_____________________________


Weiner described how powerful the phrase, "Next Play" has been for the company.

 

On the day LinkedIn became a public company, employees received a black T shirt with the company’s name and stock ticker written across the front and Next Play emblazoned on the back of the shirt. Even today 16 months after the LinkedIn IPO, employees continue to talk about their Next Play and stay focused on delivering results.
1) Define leadership : At LinkedIn, Leadership is the ability to inspire others and achieve shared results. ...to create economic opportunity for the 3.3 billion people in the global workplace by matching skills with job opportunities.
3) Prioritize your business goals: ...if we could only do one thing, what would it be? This is a lesson Weiner learned from Steve Jobs and practices every day. 

6) Customers first: ... anytime the LinkedIn product team considers new enhancements the first question revolves around: Is this putting our members first, or is this putting the company first? “If it benefits members, it will ultimately benefit the company.


7) Remember To laugh: ...Weiner says he values his team members’ sense of humor and sometimes, on a tough day, that can trump their talent and expertise!


Read the full post here.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, September 19, 2012 8:42 PM
Thanks Lynn!
Manish Puranik's curator insight, July 9, 2013 9:25 PM

Few more lessons on Leadership...!

Rescooped by Robin Martin from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

Social Business Culture is winning in the Competitive High Tech Business, Change Leader

Social Business Culture is winning in the Competitive High Tech Business, Change Leader | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"Social business culture wins again in the competitive high tech world, with collaboration and tremendous employee and client loyalty to prove it."

   

This is one of the smarter change/culture pieces of read recently, with good stats and means.  It's a Forbes piece on collaborative culture by Christine Comaford, contributor.  Here collaboration is NOT a myth or buzz word,  rather it appears to be in full practice and working quite well, thank you!  ~  Deb

   

Excerpts:

   

Stats on Enterasys:  One of the fastest growing networking companies in high tech:

 

Produced 3 years of consecutive top-line year-over-year revenue growth Grown 25% of sales from new customers Had less than 5% annual employee attrition Has a Net Promoter Score of 81 – NPS score is not a typo     Their tools used include Salesforce.com’s Chatter, Twitter, Facebook to accelerate business via connection & collaboration.     

_________________________

   

A ‘social’ executive sponsor must be S.O.C.I.A.L. – sincere, open, collaborative, interested, authentic and likeable.

   

_________________________

   

Vala Afshar, Enterasys’ Chief Customer Officer says it is because the company is a social enterprise featuring their collaborative and customer focused culture thriving in this highly competitive market.

   

Samples of the tenents of their culture building & sustaining:

   

1. Define a meaningful purpose

    

Social collaboration is not about social media. It is about the purpose of collaboration and execution. A strong culture is based on tenants of transparency, accountability, execution velocity, and mass collaboration.

   

2. Ensure simplicity and user experience

   

Key:  social technology selection criterion must be “ease of use” for both the employee and customer experience => highly dependent on seamless integration, ease of use, and alignment to existing workflows.

   

3. Have a ‘social’ executive sponsor

   

The executive must be S.O.C.I.A.L. – sincere, open, collaborative, interested, authentic and likeable. The executive sponsor must be actively engaged and enthusiastically willing to promote inter-departmental collaboration. Influence and likeability are key success factors.

   

_________________________

  

[Don't] force collaboration, [instead offer] encouragement and invitation to growth.

   

_________________________

   

6. Create social collaboration functional groups

   

Pre-establish a group representing various functions - a social collaboration team, including a Social ELT members (marketing, sales, services, IT, engineering – extended leadership team), who represent various functions, can do this at the beginning. Within lines of business, it is more likely that employees will collaborate.

 

Once comfortable collaborating internally, connections will begin to establish outside the lines of business.

   

8. Measure adoption

   

Celebrate and recognize power collaborators and how they are positively impacting business objectives. Recognize the most followed, the most posts and even potential for training opportunities. [Don't] force collaboration, instead offer encouragement and invitation to growth.

   

10. Passionately embrace change and have fun

  

Social collaboration is ...most of all it is about enjoying the people your work with and the work that you do. Have fun growing mindshare and your business.

    

Source:  http://www.forbes.com/sites/christinecomaford/2012/06/19/if-you-are-not-social-you-will-shrink-10-steps-to-becoming-a-social-business/

 

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

Russell Goldsmith of City National, on Storytelling’s Power in a Powerful, Positive Culture

Russell Goldsmith of City National, on Storytelling’s Power in a Powerful, Positive Culture | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

The power of a story to teach, reinforce culture, and reward behavior, is central for how this bank executive leads at City National Bank in Los Angeles.

 

This reminds me of the power of the story by consulting colleague, Dr. Rick Fenwick, of Fenwick-Koller Associates.  We recently completed another round of Team Concept training for the UAW workers at GM Powertrain.  Our 4 day session is nuanced by story, Rick's colorful examples as well as stories shared by team members, learning about managing team experiences, including tools to help.

 

Goldsmith's example below embeds recognition and reward of the story into the culture of City National Bank.

 

 

Excerpt:

Russell Goldsmith is chairman and chief executive of City National Bank in Los Angeles. In its “Story Idol” competition, he says, employees talk about “what they did that promoted teamwork or helped a client by going the extra mile.”

 

_____________________________

 

We [taught] people how to share stories [including] something called “Story Idol,” and every quarter there’s a competition...

_____________________________

 

 

...we have a lot of great stories to tell. If you look up City National, one of the stories you will see is the story of Frank Sinatra’s son who was kidnapped. The first C.E.O., Al Hart, was a real friend of Frank Sinatra’s and famously opened the vault on a Saturday and got the ransom money. That happened in the early ’60s, but people are still telling that story. It’s a source of pride.

 

We brought in consultants to teach people how to share stories in a more organized way that underscored the culture. We do something called “Story Idol,” and every quarter there’s a competition among our 79 offices.

 

It’s a way to give colleagues a pat on the back and a moment in the sun for doing the right thing, and it democratizes and decentralizes positive reinforcement.

 

_____________________________

 

...what matters most is the recognition, and the respect from your peers as you stand on the stage in front of 300 people.

_____________________________

 

The people who submit the winning stories [Story Idol competition] all get iPads. The winners themselves ...get significant cash awards. But what matters most is the recognition, and the respect from your peers as you stand on the stage in front of 300 people.

 

Read the full post via the New York Times by author ADAM BRYANT here.

 

===

 

Thanks to my change colleague, Liz Guthridge, @LizGuthridge, for the heads up. If you have a change leader that merits a look via this curation stream, let me know via DebNystrom@Reveln.com or suggest it as a curation post in ScoopIt.

 

More about us, on the Fenwick Koller Associates team with Reveln Consulting is here.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

Accessible Leadership: Why the CEO needs to drive communication & culture change to improve customer experience

Accessible Leadership: Why the CEO needs to drive communication & culture change to improve customer experience | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it
Leadership Required: Why the CEO needs to drive communication and culture change to improve customer experience.

 

A simple but not simplistic 3 point list of a leader's role in communicating with all hands in culture change. From Experience Required™

 

Excerpted:

 

 

The CEO’s role must be one of brand champion...[to] ensure that the company’s brand strategy is implemented, instead of becoming just another “thing” that everyone should do.

 

Here are three things leaders can start to do today to ensure greater success:

 

#1. Be visible.
Employees need to see you (literally) leading the effort ...[to] know that you truly believe in its value and its impact. Get out and develop relationships with your employees. ...[and] hear what’s really going on from those that directly interact with your customers.

 

#2. Give feedback regularly.
Recognize employees often with specific feedback on what they did well. Help them connect to the purpose and how their individual efforts fit in with the big picture.

 

Giving their work greater meaning helps them realize they’re working for a company they can be proud of. 

 

#3. Demonstrate quick wins.
Make it a point to regularly update employees on progress. Show them how their feedback led to actionable improvements in process, employee, and customer experiences.

 

You have to walk the talk and show you’re prepared to make changes that improve the experience. Once your employees realize their input is valued, they’ll open up more and be more motivated to follow your example.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
No comment yet.