If you lead them, they will follow!
2.0K views | +0 today
Follow
If you lead them, they will follow!
Traits today's leaders "must have" to survive and lead without self-destructing
Curated by Robin Martin
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

How To Use Conflict To Unlock Creativity

How To Use Conflict To Unlock Creativity | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

The average CEO spends 25% of his time coping with conflicts. It’s worth asking how much of that conflict has truly been used for useful purposes, like fostering creativity?

Business mythology is rife with tales of firms that use conflict to rediscover their true purpose. Steve Jobs left Apple after conflicts arose regarding his dual role as VP and board chair. The exile enabled him to return invigorated and with a precise understanding of what the company needed. In a devilish move, IBM Chairman Louis Gerstner brought the behemoth computer manufacturer to its knees by creating conflict between its skilled engineering brain trust and a band of rebels experimenting with the brave new world of superconductivity. The result? IBM left behind bulky mainframes--a declining revenue stream--and moved deftly into networking technology (and later business consulting).


Via The Learning Factor
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
Scoop.it!

Improvisation May Be the Key to Successfully Managing Change, MIT

Improvisation May Be the Key to Successfully Managing Change, MIT | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"Key attributes for almost any organization, and SO CHALLENGING to implement: agility , flexibility, improvisation – a company’s ability to quickly change is crucial to its long-term success."

 

 MIT's Leadership Center weighs in via an article by professor Wanda J. Orlikowski that equates a successful company to an orchestra.   Yes, I've heard this before.  Benjamin Zander is quite compelling in his leadership videos on this very note, pun intended.

 

_______________________________

 

...to allow for improvisation, CEOs need to release some control and allow employees to experiment.
_______________________________

 

What is helpful in the article is yet another example of "letting go" as in, "sometimes, however, the conductor needs to let go and let its skilled and creative musicians lead."  Well now, MIT, yes.  And Orpheus, the conductor-less orchestra, has taught us as much.  Releasing "some control" as quoted below, is the magic sauce, in my opinion, and adding in some feedback and perspective, on lessons learned, is a part of it.

 

_______________________________

 

"sometimes, however, the conductor needs to let go and let its skilled and creative musicians lead."

 

Yes, Orpheus, the conductor-less orchestra, has taught us as much. 

 

_______________________________

 

It is always, helpful, however to review suggestions for how to create and sustain an agile, flexible, improvisational culture.  

 

Here are Orlikowski's tips for creating such an organization, excerpted:

 

Plan to improvise - sometimes you can anticipate change, and if you can do that, you should plan to address that change in a flexible way Adapt when you cannot foresee – as business rules are changing, adapt and test on a smaller, departmental scale before making company-wide changes Create a learning environment – encourage communication between your employees in different locations and departments, push everyone to learn from each other Encourage flexibility – to allow for improvisation, CEOs need to release some control and allow employees to experiment Improvise today for success tomorrow – create a culture of experimentation and improvisation even when you’re not experiencing extreme change in practice for when you do need to change

 

 

A companion article and video to this one is how Asst. Professor Steve Leybourne, Boston University experiences improv connected with the finance industry, creating a model and citing risk, reward in managers who surreptitiously improvise.   In his video, you'll see evidence of the "let go of micromanaging" and still how it is tentative in corporate culture.  It seems we have a long way to go to let go, but writing about those who research it is a start.  

 

Source:  http://www.scoop.it/t/innovation-institutions-will-it-blend/p/1715217458/moving-beyond-surreptitious-manager-improv-risk-reward-emerging-best-practice-in-your-org-steve-leybourne

 

What is your experience with creating a culture that is agile , flexible, and especially improvisational?

 

 

Photo credit:   ePi.Longo  Article source:  Chief Executive Magazine


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Meditation Compassion Mindfulness
Scoop.it!

Companies are embracing meditation to train better leaders, one breath at a time

Companies are embracing meditation to train better leaders, one breath at a time | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

The goal of the Executive Mind class is to teach students to pay attention — to what's happening around them as well as to emotions arising within them — so that they can react more skillfully in any situation. That awareness can help budding managers motivate difficult employees and tackle work challenges without becoming scattered, frustrated or worn down.

 

Although meditation has ancient roots, modern scientific research on its effects has mushroomed over the last decade. There are now hundreds of published studies showing that the adult brain is actually quite malleable and can be rewired for more happiness and calm.

 

Research on the brains of meditators has documented neuron growth in the hippocampus — which is involved in learning, memory and emotional control — and the right anterior insula, believed to be involved in awareness. Studies using functional MRIs have recorded change in other parts of the brain as well after just eight weekly mindfulness classes and daily practice averaging just 27 minutes.

 

That's important, because many scientists have concluded that our brains are largely wired to avoid danger. So a scolding by the boss or getting passed over for a promotion triggers parts of the brain that give rise to fear and anger. Getting to the good stuff like creativity, empathy and teamwork requires engaging other parts of the brain, but that can happen only if employees feel secure.


Via Pamir Kiciman
more...
The Mindful Way's comment, April 13, 2013 3:57 PM
This is such important work to be bringing to the business world!
Pamir Kiciman's comment, April 13, 2013 3:59 PM
I agree. Business seems to endure as a powerful model in society. Since that is so and 'business' is in a leadership position, the more awake it is the better!
Rescooped by Robin Martin from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
Scoop.it!

Faster and more creative when solving OTHER people's problems

Faster and more creative when solving OTHER people's problems | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it
Recent research reveals that people are more capable of mental novelty when thinking on behalf of others than for themselves.

 

Great piece on enriching the field of view and other perspectives, something we also encourage in executive coaching.  

 

________________________

 

...abstract thinking leads to greater creativity. ...But in our businesses and our lives, we often do the opposite.

________________________

 

Excerpts:

 

Over the years, social scientists have found that abstract thinking leads to greater creativity. That means that if we care about innovation we need to be more abstract and therefore more distant. But in our businesses and our lives, we often do the opposite. We intensify our focus rather than widen our view. We draw closer rather than step back.

 

That's a mistake, Polman and Emich suggest. "That decisions for others are more creative than decisions for the self... should prove of considerable interest to negotiators, managers, product designers, marketers and advertisers, among many others," they write.

 

Dan Pink's suggestions, excerpted:

  

• Recruit more independent directors.   Begin with corporate governance. 

~ having independent directors on the boards of public companies. 

 

• Rethink the structure of your firm.

Perhaps loose alliances of distantly connected people

 

• Harness the power of peers.

....assemble a small group of peers – all from different industries – and gather periodically to exchange ideas and offer solutions from new perspectives.

 

• Find a problem-swapping partner.

Find a friend or colleague with whom you can occasionally swap problems...

 

• Disasssociate yourself.

Imagine you're doing it for someone else...

 

Full article here


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
No comment yet.