If you lead them, they will follow!
2.0K views | +0 today
Follow
If you lead them, they will follow!
Traits today's leaders "must have" to survive and lead without self-destructing
Curated by Robin Martin
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Robin Martin from The Science and Art of Motivation
Scoop.it!

FINALLY, Scrapping Performance Appraisals for What Motivates!

FINALLY, Scrapping Performance Appraisals for What Motivates! | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it
Something big is going on. More and more companies have decided to radically change their performance appraisal process.



...Adobe, Juniper, Kelly Services, and a variety of other companies ...have decided to do away with traditional performance ratings and dramatically change the annual appraisal process.

Excerpts

 

The new keys to success:

 

Develop a “feedback-rich” culture and set of tools (often online, sometimes formal, often informal) that encourages all employees to give each other feedback.      Talk about performance regularly and let employees create their own goals on a regular basis.    [Ensure] managers provide ongoing feedback and teach them how to have honest conversations.    Assume that employees already know something about their own performance, and [help them] them self-assess. ...That starts the dialogue about expectations and the match between their self-assessment and that of the organization.
Related posts by Deb:
Creator, Challenger, Coach through Change: Getting out of the Drama  The Impact of a Challenging Goal, Parasailing in Key West              Change, Innovators, Creativity and Community, Will it Blend?


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 6, 2013 11:15 AM

IS this slow moving change finally taking hold?!  From a Chris Lee article on problematic appraisal in the 90's ot Coen's & Jenkins "Abolishing Appraisals" book in 2002, finally the death bell may be ringing.


More than a decade later, there is hope for corporations abandoning this deeply flawed corporate millstone in exchange for a healthier, feedback rich and goal/challenge driven culture.   ~  Deb

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 10, 2013 1:58 PM

It's time for performance management to fade and for positive talent development systems to move forward.  As an example of this, Skillrater.com has arrived on the scene, integrated into social media and positive feedback practices.  More news and scoops to follow.  ~  Deb

Rescooped by Robin Martin from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
Scoop.it!

Improvisation May Be the Key to Successfully Managing Change, MIT

Improvisation May Be the Key to Successfully Managing Change, MIT | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"Key attributes for almost any organization, and SO CHALLENGING to implement: agility , flexibility, improvisation – a company’s ability to quickly change is crucial to its long-term success."

 

 MIT's Leadership Center weighs in via an article by professor Wanda J. Orlikowski that equates a successful company to an orchestra.   Yes, I've heard this before.  Benjamin Zander is quite compelling in his leadership videos on this very note, pun intended.

 

_______________________________

 

...to allow for improvisation, CEOs need to release some control and allow employees to experiment.
_______________________________

 

What is helpful in the article is yet another example of "letting go" as in, "sometimes, however, the conductor needs to let go and let its skilled and creative musicians lead."  Well now, MIT, yes.  And Orpheus, the conductor-less orchestra, has taught us as much.  Releasing "some control" as quoted below, is the magic sauce, in my opinion, and adding in some feedback and perspective, on lessons learned, is a part of it.

 

_______________________________

 

"sometimes, however, the conductor needs to let go and let its skilled and creative musicians lead."

 

Yes, Orpheus, the conductor-less orchestra, has taught us as much. 

 

_______________________________

 

It is always, helpful, however to review suggestions for how to create and sustain an agile, flexible, improvisational culture.  

 

Here are Orlikowski's tips for creating such an organization, excerpted:

 

Plan to improvise - sometimes you can anticipate change, and if you can do that, you should plan to address that change in a flexible way Adapt when you cannot foresee – as business rules are changing, adapt and test on a smaller, departmental scale before making company-wide changes Create a learning environment – encourage communication between your employees in different locations and departments, push everyone to learn from each other Encourage flexibility – to allow for improvisation, CEOs need to release some control and allow employees to experiment Improvise today for success tomorrow – create a culture of experimentation and improvisation even when you’re not experiencing extreme change in practice for when you do need to change

 

 

A companion article and video to this one is how Asst. Professor Steve Leybourne, Boston University experiences improv connected with the finance industry, creating a model and citing risk, reward in managers who surreptitiously improvise.   In his video, you'll see evidence of the "let go of micromanaging" and still how it is tentative in corporate culture.  It seems we have a long way to go to let go, but writing about those who research it is a start.  

 

Source:  http://www.scoop.it/t/innovation-institutions-will-it-blend/p/1715217458/moving-beyond-surreptitious-manager-improv-risk-reward-emerging-best-practice-in-your-org-steve-leybourne

 

What is your experience with creating a culture that is agile , flexible, and especially improvisational?

 

 

Photo credit:   ePi.Longo  Article source:  Chief Executive Magazine


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
No comment yet.