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If you lead them, they will follow!
Traits today's leaders "must have" to survive and lead without self-destructing
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Trending Down for years: Yahoo Investors Need to Worry About Marissa Mayer

Trending Down for years:  Yahoo Investors Need to Worry About Marissa Mayer | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

"By fighting trends, like telecommuting, Ms. Mayer's focus on tactics further damages Yahoo - which desperately needs a CEO with vision to create a new strategy."


Excerpts:

 

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Yahoo has been a struggling company for several years.

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...Yahoo has lacked an effective strategy for a decade.  ..It has no technology advantage, no product advantage and no market advantage.  It is so weak in all markets that its only value has been as a second competitor that keeps the market leader from being attacked as a monopolist!

 

A series of CEOs have been unable to develop a new strategy for Yahoo to make it more like Amazon or Apple and less like – well, Yahoo. 

 

...Ms. Mayer was brought into the flailing company from Google, which is a market leader, to turn around Yahoo.  But she’s been on the job 7 months, and there still is no apparent strategy to return Yahoo to greatness.

 

Related posts by Deb:


 There’s No Such Thing as Leadership? Pull, Influence and “Open Space” vs. Power     Status Quo Shakedown Meets Right Action

   

Knowledge, Passion & Power: 3 Simple Change Principles to Release It

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 4, 2013 12:11 PM

Yahoo's spotlight in the news seems to now be a cautionary tale about how not to change. 


Mayer's success at Google seems as if it is not translating into vision and right action (first steps), even after 7 months, at Yahoo.

Leadership IS about followers and inspiration to adapt.  Yahoo seems to have chosen conventional communication (email) as well as traditional management techniques in a company that seems more and more old school in adapting to change. 


If nothing else, Yahoo, note, the medium is the message, a quote from Marshall McLuhan.

~  Deb 

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Russell Goldsmith of City National, on Storytelling’s Power in a Powerful, Positive Culture

Russell Goldsmith of City National, on Storytelling’s Power in a Powerful, Positive Culture | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

The power of a story to teach, reinforce culture, and reward behavior, is central for how this bank executive leads at City National Bank in Los Angeles.

 

This reminds me of the power of the story by consulting colleague, Dr. Rick Fenwick, of Fenwick-Koller Associates.  We recently completed another round of Team Concept training for the UAW workers at GM Powertrain.  Our 4 day session is nuanced by story, Rick's colorful examples as well as stories shared by team members, learning about managing team experiences, including tools to help.

 

Goldsmith's example below embeds recognition and reward of the story into the culture of City National Bank.

 

 

Excerpt:

Russell Goldsmith is chairman and chief executive of City National Bank in Los Angeles. In its “Story Idol” competition, he says, employees talk about “what they did that promoted teamwork or helped a client by going the extra mile.”

 

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We [taught] people how to share stories [including] something called “Story Idol,” and every quarter there’s a competition...

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...we have a lot of great stories to tell. If you look up City National, one of the stories you will see is the story of Frank Sinatra’s son who was kidnapped. The first C.E.O., Al Hart, was a real friend of Frank Sinatra’s and famously opened the vault on a Saturday and got the ransom money. That happened in the early ’60s, but people are still telling that story. It’s a source of pride.

 

We brought in consultants to teach people how to share stories in a more organized way that underscored the culture. We do something called “Story Idol,” and every quarter there’s a competition among our 79 offices.

 

It’s a way to give colleagues a pat on the back and a moment in the sun for doing the right thing, and it democratizes and decentralizes positive reinforcement.

 

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...what matters most is the recognition, and the respect from your peers as you stand on the stage in front of 300 people.

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The people who submit the winning stories [Story Idol competition] all get iPads. The winners themselves ...get significant cash awards. But what matters most is the recognition, and the respect from your peers as you stand on the stage in front of 300 people.

 

Read the full post via the New York Times by author ADAM BRYANT here.

 

===

 

Thanks to my change colleague, Liz Guthridge, @LizGuthridge, for the heads up. If you have a change leader that merits a look via this curation stream, let me know via DebNystrom@Reveln.com or suggest it as a curation post in ScoopIt.

 

More about us, on the Fenwick Koller Associates team with Reveln Consulting is here.


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Cultural awareness 80% of Change Management Success, Lean Change, Internationally

Cultural awareness 80% of Change Management Success, Lean Change, Internationally | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it

Culture consciousness and people management present challenges greater than those related to cost trimming when implementing change, via Lebanese-born Dr. Joe Khoury.

  

Deep change expertise, communication & inclusion in goal achievement lean process is key to this review. ~  Deb

 

Excerpted:

 

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...people were working 12- to 13-hour days unnecessarily – they were, after all, only paid for eight.

 

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Dr. Khoury was one of three engineers lined up to relate success stories of lean principles’ implementation.

 

“Never underestimate the importance of culture,” Dr. Khoury cautioned.  "...Understanding your people will take you a long way towards reaching your lean goals.”

 

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Through ...illustrating where teams were at in reaching their targets ...people were able to take corrective action sooner.

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Dr. Khoury and others from the wider Methode family, including former manager Edward Chetcuti, now a lean adviser and coach, devised the VAVE (value added, value engineering) process to deliver value more efficiently.

 

The process was implemented successfully in China, where labor costs are traditionally lower, and later in the US.

 

The team also created customized software, able to provide a snapshot of the movements of major contributors to raw material cost. The software was later patented.

 

In Mr. Chetcuti earlier project, he examined behavior and processes and found that people were working 12- to 13-hour days unnecessarily – they were, after all, only paid for eight.

 

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“Information must be cascaded so that everyone within the organisation is aware of the goals,” ~ Antoine Bonello

 

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After classroom training & simulation, Mr Chetcuti and the team took the principles to the shopfloor. People learned to see waste and took ownership of the mission to reduce it and to get things right first time.

 

Through ...illustrating where teams were at in reaching their targets ...people were able to take corrective action sooner. Creative flow of value to the customer began soon after the company stabilised. Within eight months, profits improved significantly.

  
“Information must be cascaded so that everyone within the organisation is aware of the goals,” Betfair’s global head of process improvement Antoine Bonello, explained.

 

   

“We expect people to learn by themselves, but even in the best companies, employees can score very low on knowledge of what they are doing. Value engineering prevents mistakes from being replicated. ”

 

Read the full article here.


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Accessible Leadership: Why the CEO needs to drive communication & culture change to improve customer experience

Accessible Leadership: Why the CEO needs to drive communication & culture change to improve customer experience | If you lead them, they will follow! | Scoop.it
Leadership Required: Why the CEO needs to drive communication and culture change to improve customer experience.

 

A simple but not simplistic 3 point list of a leader's role in communicating with all hands in culture change. From Experience Required™

 

Excerpted:

 

 

The CEO’s role must be one of brand champion...[to] ensure that the company’s brand strategy is implemented, instead of becoming just another “thing” that everyone should do.

 

Here are three things leaders can start to do today to ensure greater success:

 

#1. Be visible.
Employees need to see you (literally) leading the effort ...[to] know that you truly believe in its value and its impact. Get out and develop relationships with your employees. ...[and] hear what’s really going on from those that directly interact with your customers.

 

#2. Give feedback regularly.
Recognize employees often with specific feedback on what they did well. Help them connect to the purpose and how their individual efforts fit in with the big picture.

 

Giving their work greater meaning helps them realize they’re working for a company they can be proud of. 

 

#3. Demonstrate quick wins.
Make it a point to regularly update employees on progress. Show them how their feedback led to actionable improvements in process, employee, and customer experiences.

 

You have to walk the talk and show you’re prepared to make changes that improve the experience. Once your employees realize their input is valued, they’ll open up more and be more motivated to follow your example.


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