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The Global Food Waste Scandal

TED Talks Western countries throw out nearly half of their food, not because it’s inedible -- but because it doesn’t look appealing. Tristram Stuart delves into the shocking data of wasted food, calling for a more responsible use of global resources.

 

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perpective on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 6:13 PM

Ted explains it well how we all waste perfectly good food that people would like to eat. Also it was amazing how much food was in the dumpsters that was just a day or week old. That meat could feed hundreds of people that are struggling to eat and all that meet to waste. 

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:51 AM

Ted talks about just how wasteful our planet is. How we just ignore the issue and act like it will  not affect us in the future. When he shows you video and pictures of massive piles of the ends of a loaf of bread or all the food that Stop and Shop throws out because it does not "look" good for the customer. How every little bit of help counts you can try to make a little bit of an effort to be less wasteful. We have so much unnecessary waste. Like when he uses the example of how many people throw away the ends of a loaf of bread then he shows the waste of the ends of bread in massive piles it makes you sick. Especially with all of the hungry people in the world we need to be more resourceful.

 

 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 2014 2:13 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Rescooped by Dot MacKenzie from Geography Education
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7 Billion, National Geographic Magazine

See photos from 7 Billion: http://bit.ly/hhYz3m With the worldwide population expected to exceed seven billion in 2011, National Geographic magazine offers a...

 

This video provides excellent material for discussing population growth, space and sustainability.


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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:03 PM

The increase in global population is definitely a hot button topic in today's world. Many wonder if the planet will be able to really sustain so many new people, and if it can truly sustain our current number of humans. This video does a good job of addressing these problems and presenting how things will likely come to be. Our planet is capable of producing great amounts of food and material the real hurdle comes down to how well nations will cooperate. Unfortunately politics and money seem to be the real snagging point in the distribution of aid and resources to many.  

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 2015 4:25 PM

The rapid growth occurring is staggering.  I believe we do need to start thinking about the future in generations.  Where will we be in 50-100 years and where do we need to be.  So basically you need to start thinking about your childrens' childrens' future.  We need to make changes to sustain the increase in population.  

Erin McLeod's curator insight, August 6, 2015 10:55 PM

Geography - Human Population in senior school

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What does it feel like to fly over planet Earth?

A time-lapse taken from the front of the International Space Station as it orbits our planet at night. This movie begins over the Pacific Ocean and continues...

 

This is an extraordinary view of the Earth that captivates students and often gives them a sense of awe and wonder for the planet we call home. 


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Video: MOVE

3 guys, 44 days, 11 countries, 18 flights, 38 thousand miles, an exploding volcano, 2 cameras and almost a terabyte of footage...

 

Here is an excellent video that inspires students to see the world and learn about the people and cultures from far of places. 


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Frédéric Pouget's comment, October 29, 2011 3:42 AM
You can check the older Matt's video on the same topic: http://www.scoop.it/t/geomatique/p/598907977/where-the-hell-is-matt-2008
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Historypin

This is a video introduction to www.historypin.com which might just prove to be a very useful and important project.  It's historical geography powered by collaborative mapping that is infused with social media dynamics.  Backed by Google, they are geo-tagging old photos to recreate the historical geographies of all places and comparing them with current street view images.  You can search by topic, place or date...this has the potential to be very big.   


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4995songs's comment, November 16, 2011 4:13 PM
Absolutely brilliant! The possibilities that this offers are staggering. If museums, galleries, and archives all got on board with this, they could create an incredible database that would allow teachers to add so much more depth to their lessons. I feel like having a visual timeline paired with geographic references in this capacity would give students (and everyone else!) a stronger understanding of how deeply history and geography are connected.
Seth Dixon's comment, November 16, 2011 6:40 PM
Agreed, this is conceptually amazing...but what a vast undertaking. I'm half-tempted to upload some pictures but I know that I've got too many pet projects at the moment and think that this one has the potential to overwhelm me time-wise.
GIS student's comment, November 17, 2011 3:37 PM
Awesome site! As an aspiring teacher, this website can be great for then and now projects. When explaining different eras or time periods this not only shows where certain things took place, but what they looked like as well. Definitely something that will become more popular in the social media aspect of society. Definitely a site I can spend hours on.
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Nat'l Geographic Video -- Hurricanes 101

Nat'l Geographic Video -- Hurricanes 101 | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it
Find out how hurricanes can be so destructive.

 

Not only will you learn about hurricanes but you can also watch videos about lighting, tornadoes, volcanoes, and overall everything about the weather. These are great videos to use in class when teaching units about natural disasters. These videos are full of great engaging facts.


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Carly Griffiths's curator insight, May 17, 1:04 AM

I absolutely loved watching these videos. I believe they would be a fantastic resource to show students or for students to use for research when exploring natural disasters. This site provides multiple videos on multiple different disasters. Each video provides great information and facts including, causes, when and where they are most likely to happen, the amount of damage, different sizes and speed and past examples. Each video provides such great visuals and explanation for these natural disasters. Students would be able to gain deep knowledge and understandings to support their research and/or investigation. I am currently in the middle of creating a task for my students using digital technologies such as this and incorporating collaboration through Wikis and blog. I plan to use these videos to further my students knowledge and encourage further exploration on these videos for their research.

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Sustainability explained through animation

Watch this short animated movie explaining sustainability created for RealEyes by Igloo Animations...

 


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Welcome to the Anthropocene

A 3-minute journey through the last 250 years of our history, from the start of the Industrial Revolution to the Rio+20 Summit. The film charts the growth of...

 

This video is a great primer for discussing human and environmental interactions as related to industrialization, globalization and climate change. 


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This is Our Planet

The best thing about the space program is all the satellite imagery we receive to better understand our home planet. 


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Hayley Allen's comment, September 2, 2012 7:30 PM
This video was amazing because it showed the earth in a way that many people have rarely seen it. I have never seen the earth in this way and I think it is wonderful that our technology today allows us to see the world from this perspective. I hope we get to watch more videos similar to this one, during class this year.
Jennifer Keyorian's comment, September 2, 2012 9:26 PM
This video is really entertaining . You can see a lot of the lights from the cities and the mountains . The cameras they put on the satellites are amazing . Its cool to see what the world looks like from outer space with the amazing technology humans have created .
Haley Wayland's comment, September 3, 2012 12:32 AM
This video is so interesting. It really shows how advanced technology has become to be able to take a video of Earth from space. It is amazing how far we have come and how much we are capable of doing in our lifetime and beyond. It would be interesting to see how advanced technology will become over the next decades.
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2600 years of history in one object

TED Talks A clay cylinder covered in Akkadian cuneiform script, damaged and broken, the Cyrus Cylinder is a powerful symbol of religious tolerance and multi-culturalism.

 

At first glance this TED Talk appears to be more about ancient history, archaeology and biblical studies that anything modern.  Yet as Neil MacGregor, the Director of the British Museum continues his discussion of the Cyrus Cylinder (A clay cylinder covered in Akkadian cuneiform script), it becomes clear that this historical artifact is vital in understanding how modern states conceive of their heritage, cultural legacy and role within the Middle East today (such as Israel, Iraq, Iran and even the U.K.).  As such the Cyrus Cylinder is a powerful symbol of religious tolerance and multi-culturalism and plays a role in shaping Middle Eastern cultural and political institutions. 


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Don Brown Jr's comment, October 1, 2012 9:18 PM
Objects, ideas and land can have multi overlapping meanings that are constantly being reinterpreted by each succeeding generation creating new symbolic understandings that overlap into many societies and cultures.
Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 8, 2013 9:16 AM

Neil MacGregor, the Director of the British Museum, explains Middle Eastern history using the Cyrus Cylinder.  His first point in this TED talk is especially interesting because he explains that people age and perish and objects do the same, but objects such as this cylinder survive and are able to tell important stories of history for a much longer time than people normally can.

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Pangaea

Pangaea - the idea of Pangaea and some of the evidence behind it... 

 

This is a video produced by Khan Academy, which is a key resource and proponent for the 'flipped classroom.'  While they do not have many human geography resources (math is their specialty) they do have several video designed for teaching physical geography including this one that covers


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Michelle Winemiller's curator insight, January 22, 2015 2:22 PM

great source with the video information and fossil evidence for students to get good reinforcement

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Video: The history of technology in education

A quick look at how advancements in technology have impacted teaching and learning over time...

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Caitlin Maher's curator insight, October 9, 2013 8:48 PM

This is a cute cartoon which shows the advancements in technology. Children would like this little cartoon as it visually represents the changes. 

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Making Sense of Maps

TED Talks Map designer Aris Venetikidis is fascinated by the maps we draw in our minds as we move around a city -- less like street maps, more like schematics or wiring diagrams, abstract images of relationships between places.

 

This video touches on numerous themes that are crucial to geographers including: 1) how our minds arrange spatial information, 2) how to best graphically represent spatial information in a useful manner for your audience and 3) how mapping a place can be the impetus for changing outdated systems. This is the story of how a cartographer working to improve a local transportation system map, which in turn, started city projects to improve the infrastructure and public utilities in Dublin, Ireland. This cartographer argues that the best map design for a transport system needs to conform to how on cognitive mental mapping works more so than geographic accuracy (like so many subway maps do).

 

Tags: transportation, urban, mapping, cartography, planning, TED, video, unit 7 cities.


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 14, 2012 3:42 PM
When trying to graphically represent spatial information in a useful manner for your particular audience, you will have a lot to take into consideration. How familiar are the travelers with the area you map out? Are there visuals to precisely mark on the map so that will they accurately correspond to the area?
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Amazing Statistics

This mind blowing information shows how the virtual and online world is changing so rapidly. Did you know there are 31 billion searches on Google every singl...

 

Globalization, education and the changing technological landscape are all major themes in this video. 


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NYTimes Video: City of Endangered Languages

NYTimes Video: City of Endangered Languages | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it
New York has long been a city of immigrants, but linguists now consider it a laboratory for studying and preserving languages in rapid decline elsewhere in the world.

 

This is an excellent video for showing the diffusion of languages in the era of migration to major urban centers.  It also shows the factors that lead to the decline of indigenous languages that are on the fringe of the global economy and the importance of language to cultural traditions.   Article related to the video available at: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/29/nyregion/29lost.html?adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1317132029-I36HNrdg4+dXkbgUQXnK6w


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 29, 2014 10:25 AM

This article and video were very interesting.  They point out how a city full of immigrants can help preserver a dying language.  The work being done to learn about and preserve these obscure languages is great.  The fact that in New York you will hear language spoken more there than in their home country is astounding to me and very interesting.  This fact is key to preserving these language as they are from areas of the world were the technology level is much lower and less likely to be preserved.  It is also interesting as it shows where people are coming from to live in NY.  The city draws immigrants like a sponge draws in water and this adds to the cultural mosaic that is NY city.

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LEARN

"3 guys, 44 days, 11 countries, 18 flights, 38 thousand miles, an exploding volcano, 2 cameras and almost a terabyte of footage." 

This video beautifully encapsulates the spirit of a globalized educational experience and the value of geographic understanding in an ever-interconnected world.   Geography is about broadening our minds to other places, other cultures and other ways of doing things.  In a three part series including 'Eat' and 'Move.' 


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 27, 2011 10:04 PM
I agree completely with geography is about broadening our minds to other places, other cultures, and other ways of doing things. You need to be apart of other cultures, and other country norms in order to truly respect them and learn about them. Overall you need to explore other places, and cultures with all your five senses. You need to be able to see the beauty of the place, taste the foods of the culture, listen to the sounds arounds you, smell the the distinctive scents, and touch and feel the concrete piece of land.
Seth Dixon's comment, November 29, 2011 5:49 PM
I'm a sucker for these video clips since they embody the joy of experiencing the new and the different.
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 12:30 PM

This is great because it shows people are round the world what great people and cultures are available for people to explore. It also shows that great spirit that people are exposed to. It also shows that people are outgoing and do not let nothing bring them down.

 

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Food, Nutrition and Geography

Peter Menzel's beautiful photography and our Hungry Planet...

 

This video is a fascinating portal into global food systems and how globalization is impacting local foods.  He traveled around the world to see what families eat in a given week, and how much all the food cost and where it can from.  Many wealthy countries exhibit poor nutritional habits (eating food high in fat, sugar and salt) while some in poorer people have a very balanced diet.  This leads him to describe the 'Nutritional Transition.'  Warning before showing in class: there are brief instances of non-sexualized nudity in the video. 


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Geography Movies List

Geography Movies List | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it

If you are looking for suggestions for movies that have some geographic content, this is one teachers list (offered as an extra credit option) that is grouped by regions.  Some of these might best be shown as clips rather than the whole movie, but as always, these resources are designed for you to adapt to your own classroom needs as you deem necessary.  What are your favorite movies to show or recommend? 


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Watch 131 Years of Global Warming in 26 Seconds

Watch 131 Years of Global Warming in 26 Seconds | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it
An amazing 26-second video depicting how temperatures around the globe have warmed since 1880.

This quick visualization is a excellent summary of the data of anthropogenic climate change.


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:09 AM

I wonder why the climate is changing so much it seems to be devastating. It can probably affect a lot of people because many people depend on a certain type of weather to grow food or do anything else that involves the weather like going for a swim in a pool or lake. The weather is something that many people need and depend on. Many people want the heat because they cant be in a cold area or vise versa. 

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 12, 2013 7:13 PM

A great visual dispay showing how tempetures have flucuated over the past 130 years and the futer implications of climate change today. Thoughout the video it shows how the tempeture is chaging (rising and falling) all acorss the board. However you cleary see at the end that tempeture stop flucuating and only contiues to rise. While over all it is only a 1 or 2 dagree differnce, its clear that if we go 80 years with a stable tempture and then it starts to only get warmer that weve got a climate change problam on our hands. 

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How Big is my World?

This type of mapping project is a fantastic way to teach scale to elementary school students. 


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The Endangered Languages Project

The Endangered Languages Project is a website for people to find and share the most up-to-date and comprehensive information about the over 3,000 endangered ...

 

This short video is a great primer for understanding the importance of linguistic diversity.  Why the loss of linguistic diversity (a global phenomenon) related to other themes  on geography, such as political and economic autonomy for minority groups?  Why are so many languages vanishing today?  What forces are creating these emerging cultural patterns?  For more on the project, see: http://www.endangeredlanguages.com/


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Matt Nardone's comment, September 2, 2012 3:52 PM
I learned a lot from this video/article. I can not believe out of 7000 languages today only about half will survive by the new century. I never thought of language loss as a result of injustice and oppression of a culture. I think that it is very interesting that to save a language means to restore a cultures ideals, ideology, and norms. I think that it is pretty cool Google is trying to help perserve some of the languages that may be fading. It is neat to think that one of the largest social media/communication companies has a great interest not in a universal language BUT a great interest in maintaining differences and uniquenesses about languages.
Adrian Francisco's comment, September 3, 2012 11:04 AM
I like this project and how it preserves languages that are about to die. It's not good when a language dies because there might be some information written in the language and in the future when we look at books we would not know what it is saying.
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 11:59 AM

This is a great website in which everyone should look at because it shows how everyone can come together and help preserve all these languages we all hear today. Day by day languages are becoming extinct because they are speaking English one of the most spoken languages in the world and everyone speaks it or speaks little of it that people can understand. More languages are becoming extinct day by day.

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Geography is Key

This video is a class introduction to the Advanced Placement course in Human Geography, which is intended to give high-ability students the opportunity to ea...

 

This is an excellent promotional video for geography as a whole, but the AP Human Geography course specifically.  For more from this great Florida teacher, visit his course website which has some incredible resources. 


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Kenzie Hohman's comment, September 11, 2012 9:13 PM
I liked how in this video it gave the viewer a preview of what you will learn in AP Human Geography. When I signed up for this class i thought I was going to have to memorize every country, its location and capital. This video let me really know what I was going to learn over this year.
John_Clark's comment, September 11, 2012 11:08 PM
This got me really excited to take this class. The music stirred somthing in me. I've always really enjoyed taking geography classes. And this, this was beautiful
Palyce Jeveron's comment, August 21, 2013 3:23 PM
Ive always been curious and eager to learn about various places in the world. In fact, one of my goals in life is to travel around the world to see what it has to offer and expierience new and different things from which im accustomed to. Watching this made me excited for class to begin, :)
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Tour the States - Music Video

Full album: http://www.marblesthebrainstore.com/brain-beats Music by Renald Francoeur Drawing by Craighton Berman "Tour the States" is track #1 from Brain Beats, a mnemonic CD...

 

It’s so often stated that geography education is so much more than just learning states and capitals. I wholeheartedly endorse that sentiment, but there is still some rudimentary importance to learning about where places are. I see it as analogous for English majors needing to learn basic grammar. You can’t write a masterpiece if you are still fumbling around with the alphabet. In geography, we can't have a nuanced discussion of place and interconnectedness if we have no sense of where any place actually is.

 

Tags: USA, K12, video, GeographyEducation.


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Gillian & Alexis's curator insight, November 27, 2013 5:11 PM

A great, to-the-point video showing the political geography of the United States. Quick and fast facts on the 50 states and capitals made into a catchy song! Chosen for poltical geography content. TOPIC: Geography-Location

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8 Great TED Talks About The Future Of Education And Teaching | Emerging Education Technology

8 Great TED Talks About The Future Of Education And Teaching | Emerging Education Technology | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it
These talks offer insights, concerns, and inspiration while discussing today's educational practices and shortcomings, from a variety of perspectives.

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