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Time-Space Compression

Time-Space Compression | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it
In this age of fast travel and instant digital communications, we tend to forget that not so long ago, distances were subjectively very different.

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geofoodgraz's curator insight, December 15, 2012 4:35 AM
Seth Dixon, Ph.D.'s insight:

"This series of maps shows the great leaps and bounds that were made during the 19th century in transportation technology in the United States.  This impacted population settlement, economic interactions and functionally made the great distances seem smaller.  This is what many call the time-space compression; the friction of distance is diminished as communication and transportation technologies improve.  

 

Questions to Ponder: When someone says they live "10 minutes away," what does that say about how we think about distance, transportation infrastructure and time?  How is geography still relevant in a world where distance appears to becoming less of a factor?  "

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 1, 2014 7:54 PM

With the development of modern equipment useful in maneuvering around the world, the time it took those living in the 1800's has been reduced to getting anywhere around the world with time spanning from 30- 24hrs. This of course has been made possible due to the development of roads, better boating constructions and air travel.

Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 10, 2014 8:12 PM

Since 1800 the rate of travel has increased exponentially through the years. From the very beginning of travel, it would take close to a week just to get from the east coast to the middle of the United States. Through the use of railroads we have overcome the "time" factor and essentially eliminated it from playing a role in the way we travel. Today's advances in transportation has made seeing others much easier and most importantly it has developed a connected world that allows for transport of goods and services possible to such an extent that as citizens of the United states we are able to access almost anything we need from a day to day basis. A technology like this will continue to expand and grow to make the life of people that much easier.

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Amazing Statistics

This mind blowing information shows how the virtual and online world is changing so rapidly. Did you know there are 31 billion searches on Google every singl...

 

Globalization, education and the changing technological landscape are all major themes in this video. 


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Language on Twitter

Language on Twitter | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it
API Cartographer Eric Fischer plots language shapefiles of Twitter.

 

Some other images show how social media cuts across place, time and culture and communications have 'defeated' geography to unite the world.  This image (besides looking pretty) shows that culture and place still matter within our increasingly interconnected globalized communications.  There are some very real creating obstacles to diffusion and even if the technology exists for "one huge conversation," there are non-intersecting conversations because of cultural and community differences. 


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Emily Bian's curator insight, October 3, 2014 5:13 PM

This is a thematic map showing the different languages spoken on Twitter in Europe. This Europe thematic is really neat to look at, but it also shows globalization in that Twitter is everywhere, and people are more connected because of it. This increases interactions between people living in different countries, and even different continents. 

            3) language and communication

This will help future APHUG students, because Twitter is relatable to a lot of teens and it will open their eyes to the different languages spoken across Europe and the world, and it's not just English. It connects them to the rest of the world. 

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How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live

How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it
The rapid increase in the number of cities home to more than 10 million people will bring huge challenges … and opportunities... 

 

It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.        

 


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:26 AM

It is a good thing that there is more megacities being created because you can see more people move in which will help the city function better economics wise. When it comes down to the population that is a different story because there is more people to worry and deal with. The increase of people could go both ways because it can be good but at the same time it can go bad because people will start arguing in which it can get physical which means city ratings going down.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 5:58 PM

Great info graphic on mega cities. 

Corine Ramos's curator insight, January 22, 12:03 PM

 It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.       

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The world map of chocolate (made out of chocolate)

The world map of chocolate (made out of chocolate) | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it
You may be focussing on chocolate over the weekend - but where does it come from? A global trade analysed. In chocolate (this is what maps are made for!

 

What is the geography of chocolate like?  There is a dark side (no pun intended) to the production of cocoa in many places such as West Africa. 


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ethne staniland's curator insight, May 16, 2013 11:33 AM

Interesting for our KS1 chocolate topic.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:43 PM

We all love chocolate.  We all love diamonds and jewels.  In western worlds, these items are easily come by in grocery stores and elsewhere, but what got them there was a challenge.  People in poorer tropical regions around the world worked to get the raw goods of these delicate items we all enjoy.  The payout difference is immense from cocoa to chocolate.  It is sometimes a very crooked market where if it wasn't for the hard working people who get the raw ingredients, chocolate as we know it wouldn't be the same.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:06 AM

I hope the production keep growing up. We need more chocolate and specially in Africa. 

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The Endangered Languages Project

The Endangered Languages Project is a website for people to find and share the most up-to-date and comprehensive information about the over 3,000 endangered ...

 

This short video is a great primer for understanding the importance of linguistic diversity.  Why the loss of linguistic diversity (a global phenomenon) related to other themes  on geography, such as political and economic autonomy for minority groups?  Why are so many languages vanishing today?  What forces are creating these emerging cultural patterns?  For more on the project, see: http://www.endangeredlanguages.com/


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Matt Nardone's comment, September 2, 2012 3:52 PM
I learned a lot from this video/article. I can not believe out of 7000 languages today only about half will survive by the new century. I never thought of language loss as a result of injustice and oppression of a culture. I think that it is very interesting that to save a language means to restore a cultures ideals, ideology, and norms. I think that it is pretty cool Google is trying to help perserve some of the languages that may be fading. It is neat to think that one of the largest social media/communication companies has a great interest not in a universal language BUT a great interest in maintaining differences and uniquenesses about languages.
Adrian Francisco's comment, September 3, 2012 11:04 AM
I like this project and how it preserves languages that are about to die. It's not good when a language dies because there might be some information written in the language and in the future when we look at books we would not know what it is saying.
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 11:59 AM

This is a great website in which everyone should look at because it shows how everyone can come together and help preserve all these languages we all hear today. Day by day languages are becoming extinct because they are speaking English one of the most spoken languages in the world and everyone speaks it or speaks little of it that people can understand. More languages are becoming extinct day by day.

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Production in the New Global Economy

Production in the New Global Economy | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it
Executives have long said America can’t compete in building electronic devices. But the migration of carmaking from Japan is a case study in the most unlikely of transformations.

 

"The iEconomy: Nissan’s Move to U.S. Offers Lessons for Tech Industry."  This is an excellent article on how the car and tech industries are changing the global economy.  Numerous foreign car companies are now investing in US; so is a Nissan produced in Tennessee a foreign car or a domestic?  The global economy is blurring many of the traditional ways in which we view production   and affecting the United States in particular. The interactive feature linked to the article provides some excellent data and resources.   This would be a great background to prepare students before taking a sample test AP Human Geography test (like Question #3 from 2011).


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5 Ideas That Are Changing the World: The Case For Optimism

5 Ideas That Are Changing the World: The Case For Optimism | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it
From technology to equality, five ways the world is getting better all the time...

 

This article by former President of the United States Bill Clinton, outlines numerous ways that globalization can improve the world, especially in developing regions.  He uses examples from around the world and includes numerous geographic themes. 

 

Technology-Phones mean freedom Health-Healthy communities prosper Economy-Green energy equals good business Equality-Women rule Justice-The fight for the future is now

 

Tags: technology, medical, economic, gender, class, globalization, development, worldwide.   


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Shake the Dust

This trailer for the documentary 'Shake the Dust' shows the globalization of youth culture and the diffusion of the creative art known as break dancing. This film challenges its developed-world viewers to reconceptualize how they perceive the lives of people living in the developing world as more than just poverty and misery, but to see the humanity and joy. In this 12 minute clip, you'll see portrayals of teenagers in Uganda and Yemen who are a part of cultural institutions and can be agents for change within their society and even political forces.  For more information about the documentary, visit: http://www.shakethedust.org


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English language facts | Visual.ly

English language facts | Visual.ly | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it

English language has become a global means of communication, it is not only the most widely written (counting scientific articles, periodical and the...


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Tunneling through Andes to speed global trade

Tunneling through Andes to speed global trade | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — South American engineers are trying to tackle one of the continent's greatest natural challenges: the towering Andes mountain chain that creates a costly physical barrier for...

 

At the NCGE conference, noted author Harm De Blij mentioned a daring project that would link Eastern South America with the Pacific as engineers were planning to tunnel under the Andes mountains.  Here is a link to an article on this intermodal transportation project that would lower the shipping costs from East Asia to the Southern Atlantic.  Government officials in both Argentina and Brazil have described the  project as a matter of "national interest."  

 

Tags: transportation, LatinAmerica, globalization, industry, economic, development, unit 6 industry.


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Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 7, 2015 12:54 PM

This is a great idea for a region that has the need to travel so much through such a tough area. Even if it will cost a lot of money to accomplish, in the long run it will save more than it costs to build.  This could change so much, and really boost their economies. Not only would it speed up shipping time and lower shipping costs, but it would allow more shipping to be done which means more business throughout the entire year as opposed to the situation now with snow getting in the way. Not only would it effect that aspect of the economy but it would also produce jobs for the time of the work being done, which is never a bad thing.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 8:19 AM

If this project can be accomplished, it would truly be one of the greatest engineering feats in human history. To build a railroad tunnel through the Andes mountains seems impossible, but in all likelihood with the right amount of funding, it can be done. The tunnel would have great economic benefits for both Brazil and Argentina. Goods from both countries could be shipped in both directions with out any issues. The larger world would also benefit from the train tunnel. It is estimated that the tunnel would lower the shipping costs from East Asia to the Southern Atlantic. The entire global trading market would benefit from this development.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 12:44 PM
Doing something such as this is a brilliant move in engineering. Making a tunnel through the Andes will connect countries together, make shipping much easier and doing so may cut the cost of goods being shipped and received. Just like the Panama Canal increased the cargo freight lining industry for shipping, this will also increase an industry for railways,.
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The Evolution of Western Dance Music

The Evolution of Western Dance Music | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it

"An Interactive Graphic Showing The Evolution of Western Dance Music Over The Last 100 Years in Under 20 seconds..."

 

Excellent visualization of diffusion as well as cultural syncretism in the pop cultures affiliated with globalization.  


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 4, 2011 4:36 PM
Thanks to one of my favorite people at my table at the APHG reading in Cincy for posting this link on FB.
Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 8, 2011 10:12 PM
This is a great visual to demonstrate the connection between cultures. We are such a diverse society and I think it is very important to be interconnected with other cultures and be aware of them. Looking at that visual it demonstrates with each year going by more and more pop culture gets connected with other countries.
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Linguistic diversity dwindling

Linguistic diversity dwindling | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it

"80% of all web communication is in ten languages, yet 95% of humanity speaks roughly 300 languages.  Could Apple Siri and Google Voice help save the world's languages?"

 

This graph stunningly displays the result of dwindling linguistic diversity in this era of globalization and technological innovation.  Why have so many languages been dwindling?  Why are an important few growing? What is the future of the majority of the world's languages that have so few native speakers?   


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GIS student's comment, September 18, 2012 10:57 AM
I think there is a lot of emphasis in this article based on help. The only way certain languages are going to survive is if people help promote them. I feel that most Americans are blind to the substantial amount of languages that exist because everywhere we look people are tuning English as there primary language. Global advertisements are commonly seen in English. The Olympics had an incredible amount as well. I think the root of this problem starts with education of new languages, especially in America. Language is definitely something that needs to be embraced especially at a younger age.
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The sun never sets... on the Facebook Empire

The sun never sets... on the Facebook Empire | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it
How Facebook connections mirror old empires EIGHT years ago Facebook launched as an online social network connecting a small college community from a dorm room at Harvard University.

 

These graphics show how in a post-colonial world, former colonies are still socially intertwined in a cultural network that mirrors the empires of yesteryear. Why are these modern social networks so similar to imperial patterns? What economic explanations are there for these patterns? What is the cultural impact?


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Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:38 AM

How fb has made physical distance obsolete, connecting cultures to different cultures on a global scale.

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Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010

Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010 | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it

Globalization has hit...hard and fast. 


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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 4:19 PM

Shanghai China, a global transportatio hub has grown tremendously into a megaity within 20 years. This is due to the high imports and the location on the river. This created a high import rate and a low wage rate. Because of this they were able to build this city into a megacity.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:22 PM
Wow! All I can say is Wow! Shanghai overall in every way is highly indistinguishable from what it was in 1990. On the far side it is minimally developed and on the close side it has what looks to be a fairly modern city for the 90s. Take a jump twenty years and it is as if it was built the way it looks currently Even the side closest that was developed in the 90s, looks like it was scrapped and rebuilt to be even more modern, a mega city. Because of its strategic location and has a river for transportation, it is a transportation hub, which is why it has the money to do what it does.
Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:46 AM

These two images are perhaps a goo example of how globalization has developed over Shanghai in just 20 years. The images show how once greener and more spacious the region looked before in 1990, and the other image shows how technology has developed and become an important priority to the people. There are huge tall buildings located in the area and the other natural source seen is the body of water surrounding some of the tallest buildings in the area. There is no longer any trees which is also a sign of how un-important or how simple to was for the Shanghai to knock them down to simply make more buildings. The concept shows how business has developed in the region but also shows the potentially jobs located here as well. Overall, this part of Shanghai is very economically stable but it is also important to see outside of the heart of the buildings. 

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Five of Asia's Most Endangered Languages

Five of Asia's Most Endangered Languages | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it
Meet the "hairy Ainu" of Japan, Taiwan's Saaroa, the Kusunda of Nepal, the last Manchus and the Jarawa of India's Andaman Islands.

 

The rapid spread of  Mandarin, English, Spanish, Hindi-Urdu and Arabic as the 5 largest languages (most native speakers) is connected to the spread of globalization and the cultural aspects of that phenomenon.  These 5 declining languages represent the flip side of those cultural patterns.  


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Global Closet Calculator

Global Closet Calculator | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it

The Global Closet Calculator aggregates the contents of your closet by origin to generate a map showing your unique global footprint, and puts you in charge of the global journey your stuff takes to get to you.

 

As I've worked now with the Rhode Island Geography Education Alliance, I've had the good fortune to interact with the folks at National Geographic.  They are preparing for Geography Awareness Week (Nov 11-17th) with the theme "Declare your Interdependence!"  This newly released interactive feature allows students of all ages to see the global interconnections in their lives.   By analyzing the items in our closets (or any of the items that we consume), we can easily see that  our own personal geographies create a web of global interconnectedness.

 

Tags: NationalGeographic, GeographyEducation, K12, consumption, globalization. 


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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:16 PM

A fun way for people to interact with there online closet and see how the world ties into our clothes!!

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Africa Next

Africa Next | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it
For the first time in generations, more investment than foreign aid is pouring into Africa. But is that growth enough to change its future?

 

This is the first article in six-part series designed to investigate the changing economic and developmental possibilities that are facing the African continent.  As more foreign investors are exploring potential windfalls in Africa, it is making places that were on the margins of a global economy more directly tied to the process of globalization. 

 

Tags: Africa, development, globalization, economic, NGOs, unit 6 industry. 


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Rich's comment, September 24, 2012 2:12 PM
So why is it that only one village has been recieving funding and jobs while the other is being left in the dust (almost literally) with barely any water? It is no wonder why the village that is getting left behind is resistant to the change, they have recieved nothing in return compared to the others who are recieving funding aswell as jobs. This company is endangering the lives of those people, they are poor enough as it is without their food/water sources.
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 9:01 AM
Africa is a rich country with so many problems. If you consider the fact how rich is Africa when it comes to their natural resources, then you will realize that there is a deeper problem. The investments that are pouring into Africa, hopefully will solve a lot of problems. God save Africa!
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Bilingual teaching – globalization, regional Geography and English integration

Edited by
Przemysław Charzyński, Nicolaus Copernicus University
Karl Donert, President, European Association of Geographers
Zbigniew Podgórski, Nicolaus Copernicus University


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