IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL
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IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL
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World of Geography at your fingertips

World of Geography at your fingertips | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it

Worth exploring...this isn't just a single random link.  Geocube is a portal to numerous topics, regions and themes.  

Having been voted by the American Association of School Librarians as one of the "Top 25 websites for Teaching and Learning," Geocube comes highly recommended, and rightfully so (see: http://www.ala.org/aasl/guidelinesandstandards/bestlist/bestwebsitestop25?mid=53 ).  This is a must-see. 


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The Prime Meridian: Natural or Cultural?

The Prime Meridian: Natural or Cultural? | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it

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mderder's comment, February 19, 2012 5:04 PM
The system works fine as is. Maybe down the line, when it would be far easier to quickly change the global coordinate system, this thing would be feasible. Now, though, it would needlessly entail a huge amount of labor. Just think of all the PRINTED materials which could cause confusion. You would have to change out EVERY chart on EVERY seagoing vessel in the WORLD. That, all by itself, is an enormous task, and in some areas would be economically prohibitive. Charts are NOT cheap. In the future, when everything is linked up and digital, it would be much easier. Now it would be a disaster. Some people don't think things through.
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EarthView : Bridgewater State

EarthView : Bridgewater State | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it

"EarthView is an educational outreach project of the Department of Geography at Bridgewater State University."

 

Bridgewater State is home to the Massachusetts Geographic Alliance and home to Project Earthview (I've never been so jealous of a globe before).  This inflatable, hand-painted globe in a fantastic teaching resource.  You can even enter the globe with a group under 20 and explore the Earth from the inside out.  The link is to the Earthview blog, with provides information of the project to take this globe to local schools, and other geographic resources.  UPDATE: This event was televised by WGGB with the clip now online.


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Nic Hardisty's comment, September 4, 2012 11:58 AM
I love that Bridgewater opted to teach Geography from such a simple, yet unique perspective. It's an interesting concept to view the Earth outward from its core, and see if that inspires any unique views and observations from students.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 15, 2013 3:51 PM

Bridgewater State is the home of SEMAGNET, the Southeast division of the Massachusetts Geographic Alliance (housed at Clark University).  Bridgewater State is also home to Project Earthview (I've never been so jealous of a globe before).  This inflatable, hand-painted globe in a fantastic teaching resource.  You can even enter the globe with a group under 20 and explore the Earth from the inside out.  The link is to the Earthview blog, with provides information of the project to take this globe to local schools, and other geographic resources.  UPDATE: This event was televised by WGGB with the clip now online.

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What If?

What If? | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it

This blogpost answers the (often unasked) question:  What would the world be like if the land masses were spread out the same way as now - only rotated by an angle of 90 degrees? While purely hypothetical, this is an exercise in applying real geographic thinking to different situations.  Anything that you would correct? 

 

Tags: weather climate, geography, GeographyEducation, unit 1 GeoPrinciples, physical. 


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Dania's comment, September 5, 2012 11:41 PM
well!!!
I'll tell you that it's why God created Mother Nature. maybe what we think is bad now in nature can be worse for the the Earth and human being... I think if the ground is moved 90 degree, many natural phenomena would happened in many regions of the Earth which would be harm to people, plants and animals that live in those regions. Plus, the population of poor nation would not be prepared for those climate changes.... many people would die or they have to move from those regions.
Jeff F's comment, September 6, 2012 12:50 AM
This looks like a map from the classic NES game Dragon Warrior II only flipped upside down. #nerd

Anyways, I think the most densely populated areas would be around the central ocean with New York and London being primate cities of their respected hemispheres.

Given that that the central ocean area is in an equatorial region, agriculture would likely not be very prosperous in these regions. Instead, I imagine New York becoming the center of an imperial superpower. Seeing as the most fertile regions of both South and North America are in temperate areas, agriculture would be a dominating industry.

The northern hemisphere on the other I hand I imagine would be largely undeveloped and rural. The "breadbaskets" of this hemispher are located much further inland from the central ocean.
Ian Roberts's comment, September 11, 2012 8:57 PM
First off I would like to say travel to Europe would be much easier and the Pacific Ocean grew even larger. One thing that really got me wondering was whether the world would be northern hemisphere centered or southern hemisphere centered. Currently, there are many more people in the northern hemisphere, so things like the summer olympics are held in our summer, their winter. BUt with the world turned ninety degrees, the population will be much more similar. The north will probably still have more people, but the south has America. It would be interesting to see how they would decide that conflict.
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5 Wolfram|Alpha Apps That Are Perfect For The Classroom

5 Wolfram|Alpha Apps That Are Perfect For The Classroom | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it
Wolfram|Alpha, the...

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Where Is Europe?

Where Is Europe? | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it
As both a concept and a continent, the area known as Europe has shifted over time.

 

Many see Europe (as a physical landmass) as not a discrete continent, but a peninsula on the Eurasian landmass.  Culturally though, the idea of Europe as distinctly bracketed of from Asia, is a powerful idea is not in the Western World.  Where is Europe?  What is Europe?  This article would provide good information for a lesson on regions and how we conceptualize the world within that regional framework. 


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Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 2014 10:59 AM

Europe has never been a static concept, it's likely that even people who live in the same town as you have a different idea of what constitutes the far borders of Europe. Personally I like to make a distinction between types of Europe. It seems to me that what was traditionally Northern and Western Europe differ from Southern and Eastern Europe in a wide variety of ways, especially due to Southern Europe's proximity to Africa and the Middle East.

 

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Early World Maps

Early World Maps | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it

I typically would not link to a Wikipedia article, but this one is not only well crafted, but represents an academic collaborative work in its own right.  This a fabulous cartographic gallery that explores the history of geographical thought through the ages (as archived in the earliest maps).  Enjoy the maps, and even more, the intellectual context that this article provides for each of these images.      


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Geography is Key

This video is a class introduction to the Advanced Placement course in Human Geography, which is intended to give high-ability students the opportunity to ea...

 

This is an excellent promotional video for geography as a whole, but the AP Human Geography course specifically.  For more from this great Florida teacher, visit his course website which has some incredible resources. 


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Kenzie Hohman's comment, September 11, 2012 9:13 PM
I liked how in this video it gave the viewer a preview of what you will learn in AP Human Geography. When I signed up for this class i thought I was going to have to memorize every country, its location and capital. This video let me really know what I was going to learn over this year.
John_Clark's comment, September 11, 2012 11:08 PM
This got me really excited to take this class. The music stirred somthing in me. I've always really enjoyed taking geography classes. And this, this was beautiful
Palyce Jeveron's comment, August 21, 2013 3:23 PM
Ive always been curious and eager to learn about various places in the world. In fact, one of my goals in life is to travel around the world to see what it has to offer and expierience new and different things from which im accustomed to. Watching this made me excited for class to begin, :)
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9 Excellent Free Map Creation Tools for Teachers and Students

9 Excellent Free Map Creation Tools for Teachers and Students | IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL | Scoop.it

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