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IELTS, ESP and CALL
Interesting links and articles related to IELTS, ESP, EAP and CAll
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The Importance of Place

The Importance of Place | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it

Using the vocabulary of this course, please describe in detail the geographic context of a town like this (real or imaginary).  What is the town like?  How did it get that way?  What type of meaning does 'place' have for those that live there?  


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Posts Organized by APHG Units

Posts Organized by APHG Units | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it
I’ve added a two new drop-down menu tabs to this website for my geography education resources; one that is organized thematically (this one) and well as another that is regionally focused.  T...

 

I’ve recently overhauled my other website http://geographyeducation.org in ways that will hopefully help teachers find specific resources for any given unit during the school year. I love this Scoop.it site for showing the latest materials that I’ve found. The “filter” function will also a teacher to search a specific topic as I’ve generated numerous “tags” to organize my posts. Still, if a teacher is searching for specific materials in a lesson on particular unit, there are many applicable “tags,” but they are arranged alphabetically.  So I’ve added a drop-down tab entitled “thematic.” Under this drop-down menu are pages dedicated to all the units of AP Human Geography (and environmental and physical geography as well) with links for the pertinent sub themes organized by the AP Human Geography course outline. Additionally, I’ve included approximately 10 of my favorite resources for each unit to the corresponding page. I’ve also added a post slider where I’ll organize the most important posts of the last few weeks. Best of luck in the new school year!


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Using satellite images, young students learn about human impact on environment

Using satellite images, young students learn about human impact on environment | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it

With the help of satellite images fifth and sixth grade students at Mr. Tim Blum’s geography class at the University of Wyoming Lab School got a birds-eye view of how humans have impacted or modified their environments. Images acquired by satellites decades apart showed cleared forests, irrigated crop fields in the middle of the deserts, altered landscapes (new roads and water bodies), and urban growth.

 

SD: Geospatial technologies can sound daunting for teachers that don't feel that they are specialists. Yet there are simple ways to make sophisticated technologies very relevant to just about any grade level as this article demonstrates. 


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joachim jake layes's curator insight, February 10, 6:44 AM

great to see 5th & 6th graders learning about environmental impact

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2600 years of history in one object

TED Talks A clay cylinder covered in Akkadian cuneiform script, damaged and broken, the Cyrus Cylinder is a powerful symbol of religious tolerance and multi-culturalism.

 

At first glance this TED Talk appears to be more about ancient history, archaeology and biblical studies that anything modern.  Yet as Neil MacGregor, the Director of the British Museum continues his discussion of the Cyrus Cylinder (A clay cylinder covered in Akkadian cuneiform script), it becomes clear that this historical artifact is vital in understanding how modern states conceive of their heritage, cultural legacy and role within the Middle East today (such as Israel, Iraq, Iran and even the U.K.).  As such the Cyrus Cylinder is a powerful symbol of religious tolerance and multi-culturalism and plays a role in shaping Middle Eastern cultural and political institutions. 


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Don Brown Jr's comment, October 1, 2012 6:18 PM
Objects, ideas and land can have multi overlapping meanings that are constantly being reinterpreted by each succeeding generation creating new symbolic understandings that overlap into many societies and cultures.
Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 8, 2013 6:16 AM

Neil MacGregor, the Director of the British Museum, explains Middle Eastern history using the Cyrus Cylinder.  His first point in this TED talk is especially interesting because he explains that people age and perish and objects do the same, but objects such as this cylinder survive and are able to tell important stories of history for a much longer time than people normally can.

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Indo-European Languages Originated in Anatolia, Biologists Say

Indo-European Languages Originated in Anatolia, Biologists Say | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it
Evolutionary biologists say the first speakers of what would become the Indo-European languages were probably farmers in what is now Turkey — a conclusion that differs by hundreds of miles and thousands of years from a longstanding linguistic theory.

 

This research potentially can explain much about the geography of languages and the distribution of cultural groups in Eurasia. 

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Kampe Kyle's curator insight, May 27, 8:33 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concept of language, language diffusion, and philological history, as it dates all of the languages of Europe back to a unified whole in the past wherein one language in Anatolia sparked all these other languages to eventually take hold.

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20 Classrooms From Around The World

20 Classrooms From Around The World | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it

We are all different...we are all the same.   This is a set set of images that highlights the essential similarities in people across cultures.

 


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Nick Lesley's comment, May 27, 12:42 PM
i thought this was very cool and interesting to see different classes all around the world and how their culture is i would really like to see a video on the classes to see how they learn...cool article and good pictures
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Physical Geography

This a visually stunning video montage with clips compiled from the Discovery Channel's series "Planet Earth."  


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Linguistic Geography: My Fair Lady

This is a most decidedly dated reference for pop culture, but a great movie for making explicit the idea that the way we speak is connected to where we've lived (also a good clip to show class differences as well as gender norms). The clip highlights many principles and patterns for understanding the geography of languages.

 

Tags: Language, class, gender, culture, historical, London, unit 3 culture and place.


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João Carreira's comment, September 4, 2012 10:24 AM
...Even as portuguese, I apreceated it very much. Thank you.
Don Brown Jr's comment, September 6, 2012 6:30 AM
This movie clip does demonstrate how language is connected not only to space and location but individual or group experiences as well. The languages used by the upper and lower orders in addressing each other or an “outsider” are very distinct within this film. Therefore if you’re socioeconomic status effects the way you speak then perhaps the type of langue you use can indicate what different social groups within a society consider comical or entertaining such as dance and music?
Jess Pitrone's comment, April 29, 2013 6:18 PM
My Fair Lady has always been one of my favorite movies, and it really sparked my interest in linguistics and accents. Not only does your accent define where you’re from physically, but it defines where you’re from socially, as well. While Eliza Doolittle is from the same country, region, and city as Prof Higgins and the people coming out of the theater, she sounds completely different. Right away, her speech gives away what kind of social background she comes from.
Similarly to the “When did Americans lose their British accents?” article, this article helps relay how accents can help define a physical area, and it also shows a connection between accent and economics. Accent is both a cultural and an economic part of geography.
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Mapping Language: Limited English Proficiency in America

Mapping Language: Limited English Proficiency in America | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it
Although English is America’s common tongue, immigrants’ efforts to learn it present challenges to institutions and individuals alike. These graphics compare regions, schools, and communities where newcomers have settled to learn and integrate.

 

The interactive map feature of language and the accompanying spatial patterns reveal much about the major migrational patterns in the United States.

 

Tags: Migration, USA, statistics, language, immigration, unit 2 population.


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England, Britain and the UK

England, Britain and the UK | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it

This is the short version of the differences between these interrelated places and terms; the long version is much more complicated than this. 

 

Tags: Europe, political, unit 4 political, states, toponyms.


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Ally Clark/Mayse Thao's curator insight, February 7, 8:09 AM

This is kinda like the video we watched where that guy who talks fast explained the uk. Oh and this is political

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Global Closet Calculator

Global Closet Calculator | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it

The Global Closet Calculator aggregates the contents of your closet by origin to generate a map showing your unique global footprint, and puts you in charge of the global journey your stuff takes to get to you.

 

As I've worked now with the Rhode Island Geography Education Alliance, I've had the good fortune to interact with the folks at National Geographic.  They are preparing for Geography Awareness Week (Nov 11-17th) with the theme "Declare your Interdependence!"  This newly released interactive feature allows students of all ages to see the global interconnections in their lives.   By analyzing the items in our closets (or any of the items that we consume), we can easily see that  our own personal geographies create a web of global interconnectedness.

 

Tags: NationalGeographic, GeographyEducation, K12, consumption, globalization. 


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Seeds of A Revolution » 21st Century African Land Rush

Seeds of A Revolution » 21st Century African Land Rush | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it

Interesting map about farming land lending to other countries in Africa. Impossible to find the original source, but is attricuted to the Financial Times. 

 

Here is a link to the image (in low res) without political content (UN related): http://new.uneca.org/lpi/africanlandrush.aspx ;

 

Tags: Africa, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture.


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Earth's City Lights

Earth's City Lights | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it
NASA's Visible Earth catalog of NASA images and animations of our home planet...

 

This classic image is full of classroom applications.  The first impulse of most students is to note that this image will show us where people live, where the cities are or some other comment that speaks to the magnitude of the population in the white areas.  Let them analyze this for more time, and they'll notice that population isn't the whole story of this image.  A place like India shines, but less brightly than the eastern part of the United States.  I like to point out that South Korea appears to be an island (because North Korea is literally blacked out).  Politics, development, affluence and population information are all embedded in this image.  As with all maps, the more information you have about the place in question (in this case, Earth), the more meaningful information you can extract out of the map. 

 

Tags: remote sensing, worldwide, consumption, poverty, population, spatial, political, regions.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, September 18, 2012 9:35 AM
This image is pretty amazing to see. It shows what parts of the world are more modernized just by the lights seen from space. Looking at the U.S. and Europe, they are lit up very bright because they are richer parts of the world. As you look at places like Africa and some parts of South America, they are shown in darkness due to poorer areas in those regions.
Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 3:07 PM
I was impressed with the explanation of this picture especially for the simple fact that I thought it was a picture that depicted the population of certain areas of each country. Places like Africa, Brazil, areas of Mexico, and Southern US are not lit because of the areas of forest, desert and less population. Very nice picture. -Michelle Carvajal-
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Back to School with Google Earth

Back to School with Google Earth | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it
Amazing things about Google Earth - news, features, tips, technology, and applications...

 

If you've never seen the Google Earth Blog, this post is a good primer to the educational possibilities that this technology opens up to teachers.  It is not just for geography teachers; it can be a visualization tool for any subject that has real-world applications that take place somewhere. 


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Lindsey Robinson's comment, August 27, 2012 2:22 PM
Google Earth is an amazing way to teach children of all ages (and adults for that matter) about the geography of the Earth. It is such an abstract way of conveying geographic concepts. What an amazing teaching tool....and as an added bonus, it's FREE!!
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A History of Conflicts

A History of Conflicts | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it
Browse the timeline of war and conflict across the globe.

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.     


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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, August 16, 2012 5:06 AM
Oh... You are lucky ;-)
Paul Rymsza's comment, August 22, 2012 11:15 AM
the potential of this site is amazing between the interactive learning system and the correlation between the timeline and location. If the human geography class is anything like this i can't wait for it!
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 12:34 PM

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.    

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Real-time Earthquake Map

Real-time Earthquake Map | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it
USGS Earthquake Hazards Program, responsible for monitoring, reporting, and researching earthquakes and earthquake hazards...

 

This map represents the 1079 earthquakes with magnitudes higher than 2.5 that have occured in the last 30 days.  You can customize the map to display different data at any scale.  There is detailed information about each earthquake in this great dataset. 


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Trisha Klancar's comment, August 18, 2012 5:33 AM
I've used this often and kids love it. It is visual and allows them to realize what is happening at that very moment and PERHAPS gets them to see the world doesn't revolve around them! hee,hee
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Save the Endangered Globe

Save the Endangered Globe | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it
What’s lost when we lose sight of globes?

 

While I love digital images, sometimes a sturdy old fashioned three-dimensional globe is just what is needed.  As the article laments, they are becoming increasingly rare. 


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melissa b's comment, August 30, 2012 7:45 AM
Beautifully written! brings back the memories as a child and how i would spend hours playing with my old globe and discovering new places, and tracing my fingers along the mountainous features. makes me wonder what ever happened to that old globe.
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Population clock for every country

Population clock for every country | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it
Real time statistics for current population of any country. Real time data on population, births, deaths, net migration and population growth.

 

This site shows various demographic statistics for every country including some based on projections in demographic trends in the given country.  If the current trends hold (which they won't, but that is still an interesting measure), the entire Japanese population will disappear in 1,000 years according to this Global Post article.


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Scott D.Warner, R.L.S.'s curator insight, August 3, 2013 1:59 PM

Various historical essays on population have captured the attention of many who may have otherwise tended to be indifferent to what had been obvious to the authors all along.

Scott D.Warner, R.L.S.'s comment, August 3, 2013 2:03 PM
Population density dependent malfunctions in societies include crime, disease, and even war.
Kyle Kampe's curator insight, May 27, 7:17 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the population growth theme because it utilizes all of the indicators we learned in this class, including CBR, CDR, net migration rates, and population growth rates.

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AfriGadget: Recycling

A Cameroonian boy shows the recycled parts used to construct a toy RC car.

 

I originally found this video on Afrigadget. The website seeks to show people "solving everyday problems with African ingenuity." While the developed world lives in a commercial, disposable society, Africans often need to maximize the useablity of all objects. The solutions they come up with can show students that it is not all doom and gloom in Africa, an represent a triumph of the human spirit.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 5, 2012 11:40 AM
This video is short but it was interesting to me, that "car" made out of pipe, rope, etc. was built great with the resources they had. Those kids are very smart.
Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 8, 2013 6:59 AM

This video is nothing short of amazing.  The boy in the video demonstrates a toy car that he built himself using recycled objects such as slippers and string.  The video is mindblowing because children in the United States have thousands of dollars worth of toys that are cheaply made and only excite the children for a few minutes before moving onto a different activity.  The boy in the video represents human spirit in Africa because he maximized the use of objects that would otherwise not be used to build a toy car and he is very pleased about his creation.

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What If?

What If? | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it

This blogpost answers the (often unasked) question:  What would the world be like if the land masses were spread out the same way as now - only rotated by an angle of 90 degrees? While purely hypothetical, this is an exercise in applying real geographic thinking to different situations.  Anything that you would correct? 

 

Tags: weather climate, geography, GeographyEducation, unit 1 GeoPrinciples, physical. 


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Dania's comment, September 5, 2012 8:41 PM
well!!!
I'll tell you that it's why God created Mother Nature. maybe what we think is bad now in nature can be worse for the the Earth and human being... I think if the ground is moved 90 degree, many natural phenomena would happened in many regions of the Earth which would be harm to people, plants and animals that live in those regions. Plus, the population of poor nation would not be prepared for those climate changes.... many people would die or they have to move from those regions.
Jeff F's comment, September 5, 2012 9:50 PM
This looks like a map from the classic NES game Dragon Warrior II only flipped upside down. #nerd

Anyways, I think the most densely populated areas would be around the central ocean with New York and London being primate cities of their respected hemispheres.

Given that that the central ocean area is in an equatorial region, agriculture would likely not be very prosperous in these regions. Instead, I imagine New York becoming the center of an imperial superpower. Seeing as the most fertile regions of both South and North America are in temperate areas, agriculture would be a dominating industry.

The northern hemisphere on the other I hand I imagine would be largely undeveloped and rural. The "breadbaskets" of this hemispher are located much further inland from the central ocean.
Ian Roberts's comment, September 11, 2012 5:57 PM
First off I would like to say travel to Europe would be much easier and the Pacific Ocean grew even larger. One thing that really got me wondering was whether the world would be northern hemisphere centered or southern hemisphere centered. Currently, there are many more people in the northern hemisphere, so things like the summer olympics are held in our summer, their winter. BUt with the world turned ninety degrees, the population will be much more similar. The north will probably still have more people, but the south has America. It would be interesting to see how they would decide that conflict.
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The Scale of the Universe

The Scale of the Universe | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it
Zoom from the edge of the universe to the quantum foam of spacetime and learn about everything in between.

 

Click "Start," and then use the slider across the bottom, or the wheel on your mouse, to zoom in -- and in and in and in... or out and out and out... It will take you from the very smallest features postulated by scientists (the strings in string theory) to the very largest (the observable universe). This really is a fabulous visual demonstration of scale at micro and macro levels. This is an excellent way to bring spatial thinking into the math curriculum as well.

 

Tags: Scale, perspective, space, spatial, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.


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Mark V's comment, September 10, 2012 11:38 AM
I felt that this is an excellent way to understand spatial thinking which is important in many areas beyond geography.
Joe Andrade's curator insight, July 7, 2013 7:08 PM

This is a great method of teaching some of the principals behind understanding spatial analysis. An important skill in understanding the world we live in.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 2013 4:50 AM

Click "Start," and then use the slider across the bottom, or the wheel on your mouse, to zoom in -- and in and in and in... or out and out and out... It will take you from the very smallest features postulated by scientists (the strings in string theory) to the very largest (the observable universe). This really is a fabulous visual demonstration of scale at micro and macro levels. This is an excellent way to bring spatial thinking into the math curriculum as well.


Tags: Scale, perspective, space, spatial, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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100 People: A World Portrait

100 People: A World Portrait | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it

This is the truly global project that asks the children of the world to introduce us to the people of the world.  We've seen videos and resources that ask the question, "if there were only 100 people in the world, what would it look like?"  This takes that idea of making demographic statistics more meaningful one step further by asking student in schools for around the world to nominate some "representative people" and share their stories.  The site houses videos, galleries from each continent and analyze themes that all societies must deal with.  This site that looks at the people and places on out planet to promote greater appreciation of cultural diversity and understanding is a great find. 

 

Tags: Worldwide, statistics, K12, education, comparison.


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Yagmur Pak's comment, April 21, 2013 3:42 AM
The 100 People Foundation is designed to sketch a portrayal of the world in terms of population and wealth distribution by representing the entire global neighborhood through stories and illustrations. This Foundation provides immense opportunities to help students acknowledge the global issues facing our planet and improve their abilities on examining statistics about the world population. As a pre-service teacher, I would use this website to engage my Stage 2 students in learning about the diversity around the world and raising their awareness about the issues that affect the planet we all share. Students can contribute to this world portrait by celebrating someone or something in their community (e.g. interviewing Indigenous people about the diversity within their community) through photography and writing about the specific information about their part of the world. Such an assignment has the prospective to commence a discussion of understanding of who we are and what position we occupy in the world. This HSIE assignment can also be linked to a Mathematics lesson in which students collect data from their local community in small groups where they have a look at the diversity of specific groups between communities. Teachers can provide students with a few variables in order to make the task challenging, but well supported. I believe, the 100 People Foundation is offering captivating and thought-provoking resources to expand children’s view of the world which may provide vast opportunities for students to “develop awareness of similarities and differences of beliefs and practices in various cultures, and learn to detect and avoid cultural stereotypes and prejudices” (Commonwealth of Australia, 2008, p.9).

Reference:
Commonwealth of Australia (2008). Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian schools. Curriculum Corporation: Carlton South Vic.
ana boa-ventura's curator insight, June 27, 2013 11:31 PM

If you're looking at social media and diversity don't miss this site...In the last couple of years we've seen several sites / videos/ blogs rotating around the question 'if there were only 100 people in the world... ' In this case, children were asked to identify 'representative people' of that group of 100 and use visuals... many visuals.  And visuals of course bring up skin color, living conditions and much more. I don't want to be a spoiler though...Viist the site!

Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's curator insight, September 1, 2013 7:43 PM

Year 7 Liveability Unit 2

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Interactive: Mapping the World's Friendships

Interactive: Mapping the World's Friendships | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it
Technology bridges distance and borders. Individuals today can keep in touch with their friends and family in completely new ways — regardless of where they live. We explored these internatio...

 

People can be digitally connected with anyone around the world these days, without any limitations by distance or culture.  Yet, by analyzing peoples social networks, it is clear that geographic factors are still a crucial factor in mediating our scoial interactions.  The internet can, but doesn't fully conquer space.    

Tags: socialmedia, worldwide, mapping. 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 23, 2013 1:08 PM

People can be digitally connected with anyone around the world these days, without any limitations by distance or culture.  Yet, by analyzing peoples social networks, it is clear that geographic factors are still a crucial factor in mediating our scoial interactions.  The internet can, but doesn't fully conquer space.    


Tags: socialmedia, worldwide, mapping.

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How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF

How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it

Amazing work from wikipedia, summarizing the evolution of the US formation, originally here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territorial_evolution_of_the_United_States

 

Tags: USA, historical, visualization. 


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Paige T's comment, September 17, 2012 7:19 AM
This is very interesting because I had no idea that the United States had gone under such transformation. Even within certain borders, there is much change in respect to who the area belongs to. You definitely have to watch it a few times to get the full affect though.
Lindsey Robinson's comment, September 17, 2012 7:21 AM
Although the moving image makes it hard to actually pinpoint the U.S expansion at specific dates, I don't think that is the point of the map. The point of the map is to show how many times territories have changed, etc. I really like the map.. I have never seen anything like it.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 17, 2012 7:42 AM
The United States has changed drastically through the years with state borders, but I noticed that the regions' labels of the country are still similar today. For example, the southwest is much more divided today but still classified as a region with plenty of Spanish culture.
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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 3:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 1:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 7:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.