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30 Infographic Resumes for Inspiration

30 Infographic Resumes for Inspiration | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it

A few years back, presenting an infographic résumé was something completely unthinkable, even if you were applying to a job where creativity and graphic skills were important. It simply didn’t happen. Then, with the rise of the online portfolios and social networks, it became more common to present professional background and skills with a more visual appeal.

 

Today, infographics seem to be everywhere and web services will transform your social media activity and LinkedIn profile into visual displays, making it possible for those without the necessary graphic abilities to have their own illustrated curriculum.

Though popular, the resume as infographic trend is fairly new to employers, so the best option for most professionals is to look at them as a supplement to the traditional format. If you decide to create your own, look around for examples- they range from the complex to those with a more minimalistic approach. Both types can be effective, if the objective is to stand out from the crowd...

 

Visit the link for a gallery of varied and creative infographic resumes for creative and graphic design inspiration.


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U.S. AID education/poverty infographic

U.S. AID education/poverty infographic | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it

An excellent infographic that highlights the importance of education in the process of fighting poverty.  Why is education (especially women) so pivotal for development?  Should this change how we think about humanitarian aid?       


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Fiqah Nasrin's curator insight, January 27, 5:37 AM

From this article i get to know that a child who born to an educated mother will benefit more than a child who born to mothers without an education. Quite a number of women in the world are without a proper education. Is it fair to women without a proper education to be condemn to be told that their child will do poorly rather than a child of an educated mothers. Their child would eventually suceed through hard work and support from their family.

Zemus Koh's curator insight, January 27, 7:11 AM

From this infographic, I can see the importance of education and how it can impact us in our lives. Education is key as it can help us in many ways such as being able to teach our offspings survival skills and also help us to earn more so that we can bring up a family and support them. However important education is, it still comes with a price. As such, many are deprived of this oppurtunity to be educated even though education is somewhat considered a neccessity. Other benefits of education to women include a lesser chance of contracting STDs and also having a higher chance to immunize their children compared to non-educated women. Since education is a key to survival and an important part in our lives, why is it that no effort is made to promote this or to fund more projects that help the less fortunate to get a chance to be educated?

Fiqah Nasrin's curator insight, February 23, 4:28 AM

This article tells me that a child who born to an educated mother will benefit more than a child who born to mothers without an education. Quite a number of women in the world are without a proper education. Is it fair to women without a proper education to be condemn to be told that their child will do poorly rather than a child of an educated mothers. Their child would eventually succeed through hard work and support from their family. It stated that most children who drop out from school are girls and most of the people cant read live in developing countries. In this century i am sure that proper education are given to those who could not afford it as everyone want to succeed. I think that it does not matter if a child's mother is without an education as they can succeed if they work hard and opportunity is given to them.

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The Prime Meridian: Natural or Cultural?

The Prime Meridian: Natural or Cultural? | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it

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mderder's comment, February 19, 2012 2:04 PM
The system works fine as is. Maybe down the line, when it would be far easier to quickly change the global coordinate system, this thing would be feasible. Now, though, it would needlessly entail a huge amount of labor. Just think of all the PRINTED materials which could cause confusion. You would have to change out EVERY chart on EVERY seagoing vessel in the WORLD. That, all by itself, is an enormous task, and in some areas would be economically prohibitive. Charts are NOT cheap. In the future, when everything is linked up and digital, it would be much easier. Now it would be a disaster. Some people don't think things through.
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Learn about your Food

Learn about your Food | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it

Many consumers don't know much about the production of their food.  Is your food Genetically modified?  Organically produced?  Learn how to know.   


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England, Britain and the UK

England, Britain and the UK | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it

This is the short version of the differences between these interrelated places and terms; the long version is much more complicated than this. 

 

Tags: Europe, political, unit 4 political, states, toponyms.


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Ally Clark/Mayse Thao's curator insight, February 7, 8:09 AM

This is kinda like the video we watched where that guy who talks fast explained the uk. Oh and this is political

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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 3:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 1:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 7:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
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Beautiful Data Visualizations from the 19th Century

Beautiful Data Visualizations from the 19th Century | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it

Do you want some inspiration to create a visually stunning - yet fully optimized - data graphic? Well, let's go back about a 140 years... Handsome Atlas developed by Jonathan Soma of Brooklyn Brainery, provides a stunning new online interface to a large collection of beautiful data visualizations from the 19th century.

 

TR: Taking into account the age of these visualizations, one has to wonder if they intended them to be used by our generation in this way. I see potential for a "web 2.0" update of these charts to make them interactive . . .

 

Tags: infographic, historical, visualization, statistics.


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Johannes Stiehler's curator insight, August 12, 1:00 AM

Visualisierung und Infografiken sind eigentlich keine neuen Themen. Wie so oft hilft, sich mit den Ursprüngen dessen, was man tut, auseinanderzusetzen.

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Footspotting: Global Carbon Footprint Infographic

Footspotting: Global Carbon Footprint Infographic | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it

As Sustainability month draws to a close, we've dug up a gem from the Coroflot archives: Stanford Kay's excellent infographic of global carbon emissions.

Kay's design succeeds in representing a potentially overwhelming set of data on several levels: some 200+ different countries are represented by bubbles, color-coded by continent, where the size of each is proportional to its carbon emissions.

Moreover, the arrangement of the bubbles completes the metaphor, adding a further dimension of scale to the graphic: it is difficult, if not impossible, to see the big picture when one is perusing the names of the individual countries. Thus, Kay's infographic also reminds us not to miss the forest for the trees.


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Cool Infographics - Blog - The Internet of Things

Cool Infographics - Blog - The Internet of Things | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it

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Eco-Literacy Map | Visual.ly

Eco-Literacy Map | Visual.ly | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it

'The Visual Communication of Ecological Literacy: Designing, Learning and Emergent Ecological Perception'.

 

The tube map was used to display the relationship between disciplinary traditions within the intensely transdisciplinary research...

 

More information at the infographic link.


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How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live

How the rise of the megacity is changing the way we live | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it
The rapid increase in the number of cities home to more than 10 million people will bring huge challenges … and opportunities... 

 

It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.        

 


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 9, 2013 9:06 AM

More and more people are moving to the cities than ever before.  As a result I believe there are more megacities on the way.  However I think there is a limit to these cities.  How are they going to be powered?  How are the people going to be fed? Where will they work?  how will these cities impact the environment?  Where is all the fresh water going to come from?

Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 2013 4:40 AM

 It's not just that more people now live in cities than in the rural countryside (for the first time in human history).  It's not just that major cities are growing increasingly more important to the global economy.  The rise of the megacities (cities over 10 million inhabitants) is a startling new phenomenon that really is something we've only seen in the last 50 years or so with the expectation that the number of megacities will double in the next 10 to 20 years (currently there are 23).  This reorganization of population entails wholesale restructuring of the economic, environmental, cultural and political networks.  The urban challenges that we face today are only going to become increasingly important in the future.       

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 11, 2013 9:26 PM

It is a good thing that there is more megacities being created because you can see more people move in which will help the city function better economics wise. When it comes down to the population that is a different story because there is more people to worry and deal with. The increase of people could go both ways because it can be good but at the same time it can go bad because people will start arguing in which it can get physical which means city ratings going down.

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The Miniature Earth Project

The Miniature Earth Project | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it
Miniature Earth. What if the population of the world were reduced into a community of only 100 people?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this infographic and website attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners. 


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Amazing animated infographic look at various world stats

Amazing animated infographic look at various world stats | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it
Amazing animated infographic look at various world statistics in Oceania vs. Europe vs. America vs. Africa vs. Asia, from population to homicides to number of billionaires – a fine example of how to...

 

The video doesn't have captions to denote which continent is which, otherwise this is an excellent data visualization of global and regional differences, using the theme of the Olympics as it's symbolic motif. 


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Abby Budorick's comment, September 2, 2012 9:14 AM
This is such a cool idea. I love how they used olympic rings to represent the different continents. I just wished they would've put which rings represented which continents during the whole video because it was kind of confusing. Also, I don't think they should've combined the Americas because I think they are so different and the stats would probably be very different.
Bradford Baumstark's comment, September 2, 2012 2:44 PM
The idea hat they had for this video was very interesting but it was also very confusing because they didn't tell us which color was which continent. The concted words at the beginig confused me a bit too because I'm not sure where Oceania even is.
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Seeds of A Revolution » 21st Century African Land Rush

Seeds of A Revolution » 21st Century African Land Rush | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it

Interesting map about farming land lending to other countries in Africa. Impossible to find the original source, but is attricuted to the Financial Times. 

 

Here is a link to the image (in low res) without political content (UN related): http://new.uneca.org/lpi/africanlandrush.aspx ;

 

Tags: Africa, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture.


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The True Size Of Africa

The True Size Of Africa | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it

This is another old classic image that I might have shared earlier but it merits repeating. As Salvatore Natoli (a leader in geography education) once said, "In our society we unconsciously equate size with importance and even power." This is one reason why many people have underestimated the true size of Africa relative to places that they view as more important or more powerful.


Tags: mapping, Africa, perspective, images. 


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Ricardo Salaya Monsell's comment, November 5, 2012 10:31 AM
Although I do not think they do to "trick", it is true that confuses many people and makes them believe in a world disproportionate. (Apologies for my terrible google-English)
Laurence Cuffe's curator insight, August 1, 2013 1:46 AM

While size is not every thing, and Ireland seems to have returned to the UK, This is an image worth discusing in Class.

Afrikasources's curator insight, January 15, 7:10 AM

Just a reminder

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Cool Infographics - Blog - Lakes & Oceans: A Deep Infographic

Cool Infographics - Blog - Lakes & Oceans: A Deep Infographic | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it

Another great infographic from Randall Munroe’s xkcd online comic. Lakes & Oceans visualizes the various depths of the worlds water, and even includes…a mysterious door that James Cameron built his deep-sea submersible to reach at the bottom of the Marianas Trench and open?


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Infographic: Life on Less Than $2 a Day

Infographic: Life on Less Than $2 a Day | IELTS, ESP and CALL | Scoop.it
A global snapshot of the cost of survival in several developing nations...

Via Lauren Moss, Greenroom Dweller
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