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Rescooped by NikolaosKourakos from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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The Science Behind Storytelling Infographic

The Science Behind Storytelling Infographic | iEduc | Scoop.it
Brands use social for storytelling 88 percent of the time.

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, July 8, 9:18 AM

Here's some eye-candy for us biz storytellers -- a handy infographic capturing salient content about why storytelling works and application for business.


Keep this around for presentations, blog posts, etc. As a piece of storytelling shorthand, it could be useful.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Tania Tytherleigh's curator insight, July 19, 5:37 PM

Storytelling is also a powerful leadership tool we can use to really connect with our staff. 

Rescooped by NikolaosKourakos from Intriguing, interesting Infographics
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Why You Need to Build Your Brand Online [infographic]

Why You Need to Build Your Brand Online [infographic] | iEduc | Scoop.it

The Internet offers so many more possibilities for small businesses than ever before. The online marketing opportunities are limitless, and it can be done with the social networks that you use everyday.

 

So, 'Why Build Your Brand Online?' The answer is simple, because that’s where everyone is. People are going to look for information about your business all hours of the day, everyday. Give your customers the opportunity to see your brand and message at all times. Let them develop a loyalty to your business via the Internet, and the increased opportunities for revenue rewards will likely soon follow.
By developing your brand online, you are able to use a vast array of measurement tools to get to know your audience. You can see what messages, and which types of media get the most responses from your customers, as well as, what times of the day get the most activity from your Facebook Fans and hits on your website. From these measurements, not only can you better brand your message based on your customers, but you can give them the voice to support your business to others. Tailoring your message to your customers is vital to building your online brand.

Learn more about online branding and more tips for business development through social media at the article link...


Via Lauren Moss, Koen Vanderhoydonk, GetApp, massimo facchinetti, Becky Gaylord
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Rescooped by NikolaosKourakos from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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Just Story It - Scoops

Just Story It - Scoops | iEduc | Scoop.it

Here are the best articles from across the web that I can find on using stories and storytelling in business.

I've chosen them because they actually make a contribution to our knowledge and wisdom about stories, show us how to apply stories to growing our businesses, or give valuable how-to tips.

 

I weed out all the junk. And besides, who needs another post in why storytelling is important?? Where's the beef?? We want the meat!

 

I've written reviews of each article to share what I like best, what you can get from reading the article, or what may be missing in the article.

 

How To Find A Topic: Click on the Filter tab above, and type in a keyword. All the articles with that keyword will appear.

 

I may occassionally review an article that I think is problematic as a way to educate us all, although most I will simply pass over.  If you wonder if I've seen an article that is not included here, send me a message and I'll respond.

After doing biz story work for over a decade (and with a PhD in Folklore) I hope you find many great insights and tips here. Many thanks for visiting and enjoy the articles!

 

And I hope you will also visit my website for more tips and tools, & take the free Story IQ assessment so you can see how well developed your storytelling skills and knowledge is: http://www.juststoryit.com/storyiq  ;


Via Karen Dietz
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ManufacturingStories's curator insight, September 7, 2013 5:15 AM

Karen is dedicated to the art of Storytelling as a key tool in running a business or any other type of endeavor.  Here at ManufacturingStories.com we fully support this art form as the best way to generate positive and effective change.  Thanks Karen for all of your dedicated and tireless work! It's a tood Story!!

Thorsten Strauss's comment, September 9, 2013 5:15 AM
Hello Karen. "Here are the best articles from across the web that I can find on using stories and storytelling in business." Please scoop a new link to these articles. The link you put in the comments only points at your scoop page. Or was the message that your scoop page IS the collection of the great articles? A bit unclear. (PS: I suggested a scoop for you today)
Karen Dietz's comment, September 11, 2013 5:52 PM
Hi Thorsten -- the link needs fixing and I'm trying to do get that done. Thanks for your patience. The link should actually be to the entire curation. This post is a permanent post that acts as a kind of editorial page. The idea is when people want to direct others to the entire collection, they can scoop/re-scoop this page which should lead people to the site. Thanks for the comment and I'll work on clearing up any confusion! And many thanks for the suggestion, which I thought was fabulous.
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Storytelling in Web Design: 10 Great Examples

Storytelling in Web Design: 10 Great Examples | iEduc | Scoop.it

In “Storytelling in Web Design,” I explained the three most basic aspects of storytelling — character, setting, and action — and offered ways to begin including storytelling in web design using basic design elements..."


Via Gregg Morris, Karen Dietz, Robin Good
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Brad Tollefson's curator insight, March 28, 2013 12:58 AM

Excellent. 

Ruth Bass's curator insight, March 29, 2013 1:39 PM

add your insight...

Ruth Bass's curator insight, March 30, 2013 11:03 AM

add your insight...

Rescooped by NikolaosKourakos from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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How To Tell A Story -- Story Wars 10 Simple Strategies

This is a Change This PDF that you can view here:

http://changethis.com/manifesto/98.01.StoryWars/pdf/98.01.StoryWars.pdf ;

 

I'm curating this because I like it and I don't like it -- and it is worth taking a look at the assumptions going on in this piece so we can get really smart.

 

This piece was put together by Jonathan Sachs, author of Winning The Story Wars. Sachs comes from the world of marketing and branding and this is reflected in his point of view.

 

Let's get what I don't like out of the way so I can chat about what I do like. Here is what puts my teeth on edge:


1. Sachs states that "we live in a world that has lost its connection to traditional myths and we are now trying to find new ones..." Welllllllll, if your slice of reality is the Hollywood, advertising, and branding world it is easy to get sucked into this notion. But we know from Jung, other psychologists, Folklorists, Anthroplogists, and neuroscience how this is not true. There is great irony in this "myth" that Sachs is perpetuating.


2. We are engaged in a war. Hmmmmm. Well, for millenium people have wanted to gain the attention of other people -- so nothing new there. Is this a war?  Could be. But if we are wanting to employ the power of storytelling to find solutions and create change as Sachs advocates, then war does not speak to the greater good but instead speaks to winners and losers where ongoing resentment is inherently built in. That sounds like the perpetuation of war -- same old same old. 

 

3. Sach's relationship to storytelling is still at the transactional level -- I'll tell you a story and you'll do what I want. While what he really wants it seems is storytelling at the transformational level. That requires a different mind-set and different story skills -- deep listening, engagement, story sharing, etc. And he completely ignores the relational level of storytelling.


4. Reliance on the Hero's Journey as the only story archetype to follow. Well, that's a narrow slice of reality and one geared towards youth. Yet other story archetypes are desperately needed: King/Queen, Trickster, Magician for example in order to affect change.

 

5. As a result, his 10 simple strategies stay at the transactional level with a few geared towards transformation (figure out what you stand for, declare your moral, reveal the moral). Now any great professional storyteller will tell you these that I've mentioned are essential for any compelling storytelling session. So they land in both worlds of transactional and transformational storytelling.


OK -- on to what I do like!


If you want to be heard, you'd better learn to tell better stories. The solutions to our significant problems these days depends on our ability to tell great stories and inspire people to think differently. Storytelling does not take long to learn, but it does take a lifetime to master, Know what a story is and is not Our abilitiy to disseminate stories is greater now than in the past -- because of technology. That is just a reminder to expend your use of different channels in sharing your stories that are now available to us.

 

Enough! Go read this piece yourself and decide what you think about it. It's a quick read.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


Via Karen Dietz
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Meri Walker's comment, September 20, 2012 10:15 AM
Well, Karen! You made my day offering this terrific new Scoop. I'm enriched by the way you think, Karen. Especially about story... I guess we get really "bent" in a certain way by anthropological training and it's still pretty rare to find others who are looking through the kinds of filters you and I have installed in Mind. De-light-ful learning with and from you!
Jane Dunnewold's comment, April 8, 2013 1:42 PM
I'm behind the curve on this one, being new to scoop it - but as a teacher/artist I have to agree with your observation that delving into other archetypes would present rich opportunities to "language" storytelling in lots of environments. I use archetypes to get at the fears and struggles artists face in my workshops - and they aren't all about the hero's path! The Damsel in Distress is one that comes to mind...
Karen Dietz's comment, April 8, 2013 1:56 PM
I agree Jane. Archetypes can be so helpful in many ways. One of the ones I love for artists is the Trickster archetype, and the Magician. LOL on the 'damsel in distress'! Time to go put my 'big girl' panties on and deal with the next challenge :)