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Rescooped by NikolaosKourakos from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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The Identifiable Victim Effect and How It Affects Your Storytelling

The Identifiable Victim Effect and How It Affects Your Storytelling | iEduc | Scoop.it
To use the identifiable victim effect in marketing, we first need to understand the psychological underpinnings of this quirk. Let's explore, shall we?

Via Karen Dietz
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Carol Sanford's curator insight, June 27, 2013 4:01 PM

This is related to the brain's need to connect the absract and concrete. Innovation, learning and thinking anything new,  are all made possible by having an idea and making sense of it in our real lives. Storytelling is the same. The ideas in it need to be connected to concreteness, therefor a name, for it to 'sink in'.

Karen Dietz's comment, June 29, 2013 3:03 PM
So true Carol! I very much appreciate the comment and insight.
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s curator insight, June 29, 2013 7:13 PM

If a concept is too big, we can become overwhelmed.  It's easier to see how we could help one person, but it can be hard to see how we could help dozens, thousands, or millions.

 

Fellow curator Karen Deitz's comments (see below) summed up this article beautifully.

"One of the biggest mistakes I see that corporations, non-profits, and individuals make when sharing their business stories is they talk about 'a person' or 'a group' without giving them names and characteristics. In other words, whoever they are talking about are not identifiable.

 

If we don't have a name to hang on to, we can't connect. We want to connect with people. Without a name, 'a person' or 'a group' is just a concept."

Rescooped by NikolaosKourakos from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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Curiosity & Storytelling: Asking the Right Questions to Motivate, Manage & Lead

Curiosity & Storytelling: Asking the Right Questions to Motivate, Manage & Lead | iEduc | Scoop.it
Great leaders are able to ask superior questions to achieve great results. If you have all the answers, new ideas & creative solutions may get lost.

Via Karen Dietz
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Renee Baribeau's curator insight, March 18, 2013 2:20 PM

It is all in the question.

Karen Dietz's comment, March 18, 2013 9:59 PM
So true Renee and I spend quite a bit of time with clients on the 'art of the question.'
ozziegontang's curator insight, March 20, 2013 2:04 PM

We are talking about being in the Learning Mode rather than the Knowing Mode.