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The Identifiable Victim Effect and How It Affects Your Storytelling

The Identifiable Victim Effect and How It Affects Your Storytelling | iEduc | Scoop.it
To use the identifiable victim effect in marketing, we first need to understand the psychological underpinnings of this quirk. Let's explore, shall we?

Via Karen Dietz
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Carol Sanford's curator insight, June 27, 2013 1:01 PM

This is related to the brain's need to connect the absract and concrete. Innovation, learning and thinking anything new,  are all made possible by having an idea and making sense of it in our real lives. Storytelling is the same. The ideas in it need to be connected to concreteness, therefor a name, for it to 'sink in'.

Karen Dietz's comment, June 29, 2013 12:03 PM
So true Carol! I very much appreciate the comment and insight.
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s curator insight, June 29, 2013 4:13 PM

If a concept is too big, we can become overwhelmed.  It's easier to see how we could help one person, but it can be hard to see how we could help dozens, thousands, or millions.

 

Fellow curator Karen Deitz's comments (see below) summed up this article beautifully.

"One of the biggest mistakes I see that corporations, non-profits, and individuals make when sharing their business stories is they talk about 'a person' or 'a group' without giving them names and characteristics. In other words, whoever they are talking about are not identifiable.

 

If we don't have a name to hang on to, we can't connect. We want to connect with people. Without a name, 'a person' or 'a group' is just a concept."

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Exploring Empathy

Exploring Empathy | iEduc | Scoop.it

What is this ability to step into someone else’s shoes? To imagine how they feel - and to hurt for them or be happy for them?  Host Frank Stasio is joined by a panel of experts to discuss empathy, the trait that makes us uniquely human.

 

Lasana Harris is an assistant professor in psychology and neuroscience at Duke University; Jesse Prinz is a Distinguished Professor of philosophy at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York; Pate Skene is an associate professor of neurobiology at Duke University and a second year law student; and Ralph Savarese is an associate professor of English at Grinnell College, a Duke Humanities Writ Large Fellow, and the author of “Reasonable People: A Memoir of Autism and Adoption”


Via Edwin Rutsch, David Hain, JLAndrianarisoa, donhornsby, Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, January 27, 2013 10:45 AM

Want to get better at empathy in order to connect with customers/prospects and create better stories?


Then you might want to listen to this discussion by a panel of experts.


Empathy, like listening, is one of the essential storytelling skills to master. Enjoy this audio file!


And thank you to fellow curator Don Hornsby for originally finding and sharing this piece.

donhornsby's comment, January 27, 2013 2:44 PM
You are welcome.
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A Presentation App That Forces You To Tell Better Stories

A Presentation App That Forces You To Tell Better Stories | iEduc | Scoop.it
The dangers of bad a PowerPoint presentation are manifold. It might just mean putting your audience to sleep, or running afoul of the High Council of Information Design.

 

Now here's something that looks promising! I'm downloading the storytelling app now to my iPad so I can start playing with it. I'll let you know how it goes.

 

We all need better and easier tools to create digital stories. Part of the trick is figuring out which one YOU like. So I'll keep posting different apps and technologies that appear so you can try them out and decide which one works best for you.

 

Have fun with this one! If you try it out, what do you think of it?

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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The Science of Storytelling: 6 Ways to Write More Persuasive Stories : @ProBlogger

The Science of Storytelling: 6 Ways to Write More Persuasive Stories : @ProBlogger | iEduc | Scoop.it
Guest post by Gregory Ciotti. When it comes to crafting words that sell, the research shows us that stories are ...

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's comment, February 21, 2013 2:02 PM
So true Renee! I concur with comeja -- thanks for both of your comments!
ozziegontang's curator insight, February 21, 2013 2:03 PM

Read Karen Dietz's insights

Ignacio Conejo Moreno's curator insight, February 22, 2013 3:49 AM

Seis claves para contar historias perfectas:

1- Audiencia (target)

2- Realismo

3- Engadgement

4- Imágenes

5- Estructura

6- Contexto

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How To Tell A Story -- Story Wars 10 Simple Strategies

This is a Change This PDF that you can view here:

http://changethis.com/manifesto/98.01.StoryWars/pdf/98.01.StoryWars.pdf ;

 

I'm curating this because I like it and I don't like it -- and it is worth taking a look at the assumptions going on in this piece so we can get really smart.

 

This piece was put together by Jonathan Sachs, author of Winning The Story Wars. Sachs comes from the world of marketing and branding and this is reflected in his point of view.

 

Let's get what I don't like out of the way so I can chat about what I do like. Here is what puts my teeth on edge:


1. Sachs states that "we live in a world that has lost its connection to traditional myths and we are now trying to find new ones..." Welllllllll, if your slice of reality is the Hollywood, advertising, and branding world it is easy to get sucked into this notion. But we know from Jung, other psychologists, Folklorists, Anthroplogists, and neuroscience how this is not true. There is great irony in this "myth" that Sachs is perpetuating.


2. We are engaged in a war. Hmmmmm. Well, for millenium people have wanted to gain the attention of other people -- so nothing new there. Is this a war?  Could be. But if we are wanting to employ the power of storytelling to find solutions and create change as Sachs advocates, then war does not speak to the greater good but instead speaks to winners and losers where ongoing resentment is inherently built in. That sounds like the perpetuation of war -- same old same old. 

 

3. Sach's relationship to storytelling is still at the transactional level -- I'll tell you a story and you'll do what I want. While what he really wants it seems is storytelling at the transformational level. That requires a different mind-set and different story skills -- deep listening, engagement, story sharing, etc. And he completely ignores the relational level of storytelling.


4. Reliance on the Hero's Journey as the only story archetype to follow. Well, that's a narrow slice of reality and one geared towards youth. Yet other story archetypes are desperately needed: King/Queen, Trickster, Magician for example in order to affect change.

 

5. As a result, his 10 simple strategies stay at the transactional level with a few geared towards transformation (figure out what you stand for, declare your moral, reveal the moral). Now any great professional storyteller will tell you these that I've mentioned are essential for any compelling storytelling session. So they land in both worlds of transactional and transformational storytelling.


OK -- on to what I do like!


If you want to be heard, you'd better learn to tell better stories. The solutions to our significant problems these days depends on our ability to tell great stories and inspire people to think differently. Storytelling does not take long to learn, but it does take a lifetime to master, Know what a story is and is not Our abilitiy to disseminate stories is greater now than in the past -- because of technology. That is just a reminder to expend your use of different channels in sharing your stories that are now available to us.

 

Enough! Go read this piece yourself and decide what you think about it. It's a quick read.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


Via Karen Dietz
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Meri Walker's comment, September 20, 2012 10:15 AM
Well, Karen! You made my day offering this terrific new Scoop. I'm enriched by the way you think, Karen. Especially about story... I guess we get really "bent" in a certain way by anthropological training and it's still pretty rare to find others who are looking through the kinds of filters you and I have installed in Mind. De-light-ful learning with and from you!
Jane Dunnewold's comment, April 8, 2013 1:42 PM
I'm behind the curve on this one, being new to scoop it - but as a teacher/artist I have to agree with your observation that delving into other archetypes would present rich opportunities to "language" storytelling in lots of environments. I use archetypes to get at the fears and struggles artists face in my workshops - and they aren't all about the hero's path! The Damsel in Distress is one that comes to mind...
Karen Dietz's comment, April 8, 2013 1:56 PM
I agree Jane. Archetypes can be so helpful in many ways. One of the ones I love for artists is the Trickster archetype, and the Magician. LOL on the 'damsel in distress'! Time to go put my 'big girl' panties on and deal with the next challenge :)
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Just Story It - Scoops

Just Story It - Scoops | iEduc | Scoop.it

Here are the best articles from across the web that I can find on using stories and storytelling in business.

I've chosen them because they actually make a contribution to our knowledge and wisdom about stories, show us how to apply stories to growing our businesses, or give valuable how-to tips.

 

I weed out all the junk. And besides, who needs another post in why storytelling is important?? Where's the beef?? We want the meat!

 

I've written reviews of each article to share what I like best, what you can get from reading the article, or what may be missing in the article.

 

How To Find A Topic: Click on the Filter tab above, and type in a keyword. All the articles with that keyword will appear.

 

I may occassionally review an article that I think is problematic as a way to educate us all, although most I will simply pass over.  If you wonder if I've seen an article that is not included here, send me a message and I'll respond.

After doing biz story work for over a decade (and with a PhD in Folklore) I hope you find many great insights and tips here. Many thanks for visiting and enjoy the articles!

 

And I hope you will also visit my website for more tips and tools, & take the free Story IQ assessment so you can see how well developed your storytelling skills and knowledge is: http://www.juststoryit.com/storyiq  ;


Via Karen Dietz
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ManufacturingStories's curator insight, September 7, 2013 5:15 AM

Karen is dedicated to the art of Storytelling as a key tool in running a business or any other type of endeavor.  Here at ManufacturingStories.com we fully support this art form as the best way to generate positive and effective change.  Thanks Karen for all of your dedicated and tireless work! It's a tood Story!!

Thorsten Strauss's comment, September 9, 2013 5:15 AM
Hello Karen. "Here are the best articles from across the web that I can find on using stories and storytelling in business." Please scoop a new link to these articles. The link you put in the comments only points at your scoop page. Or was the message that your scoop page IS the collection of the great articles? A bit unclear. (PS: I suggested a scoop for you today)
Karen Dietz's comment, September 11, 2013 5:52 PM
Hi Thorsten -- the link needs fixing and I'm trying to do get that done. Thanks for your patience. The link should actually be to the entire curation. This post is a permanent post that acts as a kind of editorial page. The idea is when people want to direct others to the entire collection, they can scoop/re-scoop this page which should lead people to the site. Thanks for the comment and I'll work on clearing up any confusion! And many thanks for the suggestion, which I thought was fabulous.