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7 No Prep Activities for Teaching Idioms

7 No Prep Activities for Teaching Idioms | Idioms! | Scoop.it
Walk around your classroom and check their answers awarding points for any correct definition. Then share the meanings of the idioms with your class and give them an example in context. Move on to another group of idioms around a second ...
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Idiom: The Grass Is Always Greener

When you learn real English you will hear many English language idioms (both American idioms and English idioms). In this video Kristin talks about the American English idiom "The Grass Is...
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ELL Teachers Connect and Learn in Twitter Chats

ELL Teachers Connect and Learn in Twitter Chats | Idioms! | Scoop.it
A weekly Twitter chat connects teachers of English-language learners to discuss, debate, and advise one another on numerous topics.
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Learning a New Language at Any Age Helps the Brain

Learning a New Language at Any Age Helps the Brain | Idioms! | Scoop.it
Learning a second language -- whether during infancy, childhood or the teen years -- may improve a person's thinking skills, a new study suggests.
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If the idiom fits, wear it - Richmond News

If the idiom fits, wear it - Richmond News | Idioms! | Scoop.it
If the idiom fits, wear it
Richmond News
Defined as an expression peculiar to a language, idiom has its origins in the Greek word "idioma," meaning peculiarity.
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Three Surprising Ways to Use Technology to Learn a Language

Three Surprising Ways to Use Technology to Learn a Language | Idioms! | Scoop.it
This article is by Katharine B. Nielson, the chief education officer at Voxy, a language-learning company based in New York City.
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Being Bilingual Is Good for Your Brain - Fusion

Being Bilingual Is Good for Your Brain - Fusion | Idioms! | Scoop.it
Fusion
Being Bilingual Is Good for Your Brain
Fusion
California, for instance, is now home to an explosion of dual-language immersion programs, where 5-year-olds learn in Italian and Japanese.

Via Dr. Kathleen Contreras
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Learn from natural English conversation – Money

Learn from natural English conversation – Money | Idioms! | Scoop.it
Every place on earth has some sort of money system, but everyone does it a little bit differently. Listen to this episode where Harp and Andrew talk about their experiences with money in Canada.
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Grammar Guru

Grammar Guru | Idioms! | Scoop.it
Phrasal Verbs! A phrasal verb is a verb that has two parts: a verb and a participle. A participle looks like a preposition but acts differently. Particles change the meaning of the verb. For exampl...
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5 Phrasal Verbs with HOLD - hold on, hold against, hold in...

http://www.engvid.com/ Phrasal verbs are an important part of speaking English fluently. In this lesson, I look at FIVE common and useful phrasal verbs with ...
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etymology - Idiom: in my neck of the woods, AmE - English ...

etymology - Idiom: in my neck of the woods, AmE - English ... | Idioms! | Scoop.it
Idiom: in my neck of the woods, AmE. The meaning of this expression is: in the region where I live. Once I tried to find out how a word meaning a part of the body can develop an expression where it means region.
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The Grammarphobia Blog: Taking candy from a baby

The Grammarphobia Blog: Taking candy from a baby | Idioms! | Scoop.it
A: The Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms says “like taking candy from a baby” means “extremely easy.” The dictionary gives this example: “Selling my mother something I made is like taking candy from a baby—she ...
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At face value

At face value | Idioms! | Scoop.it
Idiom: at face value
Example 1- Sales representatives will do anything to sell you their product.  So, don’t take their word at face value.
Example 2- Charlie is very smart; if he gives you legal advice, you should take it at face value.
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Learning a New Language Later in Life Helps Keep Your Brain Healthy | Big Think

Learning a New Language Later in Life Helps Keep Your Brain Healthy | Big Think | Idioms! | Scoop.it
It's never too late to learn a new language. In fact, it's probably most beneficial to do so later in life.
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It's never too late to learn a new language!!

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Horsing around

Horsing around | Idioms! | Scoop.it
Idiom: "horsing around"
Example:Mariela:  Minami, you really should pay more attention in your Idioms class. I don’t think you pay attention in class, you are always horsing around.Minami: Horsing around?
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Learn from natural English conversation – Travel stories

Learn from natural English conversation – Travel stories | Idioms! | Scoop.it
This episode we’re all here sharing our favourite stories from some of our journeys abroad.
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hit the ceiling

hit the ceiling | Idioms! | Scoop.it
hit the ceiling or hit the roof  {v. phr.},  {slang}
To become violently angry; go into a rage.
When Elaine came home at three in the morning, her father hit the ceiling.
Bob hit the roof when Joe teased him.
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ELLs and Their Peers: What They Teach Each Other in the Classroom

ELLs and Their Peers: What They Teach Each Other in the Classroom | Idioms! | Scoop.it
A group of researchers at the University of Virginia will study how the social interactions between ELLs and their fluent English-speaking peers in mainstream classrooms impact learning.
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This topic is near and dear to my heart!

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IdiomOfTheWeek's curator insight, May 7, 1:19 PM

Such an interesting & important topic!

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Idioms to Learn Today

Idioms to Learn Today | Idioms! | Scoop.it
Learn/refresh your knowledge against this set!
Then check yourself by running flashcard test by definitions or by descriptions.
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To Be Floored

To Be Floored | Idioms! | Scoop.it
Idiom: “to be floored” Meaning:  To shocked, surprised, or overwhelmed by something
Example #1:
Jenny: Hey, Johnny! Did you hear that Jane and Craig are getting a divorced?
Johnny:  No, I haven't heard that.
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To Be Swamped

Idiom: “to be swamped”
Meaning:  To be overwhelmed with a great amount of work or obligations
Example #1:
Jackie: I’m so tired! I think I’ve been up for about 48 hours.
Johnny:  Oh, no. Why haven’t you been sleeping?
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take off

take off  {v. phr.}
1a. To leave fast; depart suddenly; run away.
The dog took off after a rabbit.
Compare: LIGHT OUT.
1b.  {informal}
To go away; leave.
The six boys got into the car and took off for the drug store.
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