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Why Your Next Phone Will Include Fingerprint, Facial, and Voice Recognition - Forbes

Why Your Next Phone Will Include Fingerprint, Facial, and Voice Recognition - Forbes | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
(Source: Vibe.com) What an iPhone with fingerprint scanning might look like In some ways, it’s a marvel that even half of consumers bother to lock their phones.
Kurt Laitner's insight:

Serious concerns here.  The cell phone becomes the digital identity card.  Numeric passcodes are like cash, despised by governments.  Note the FUD in the arguments for.

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Identity and Privacy
The nature of identity and privacy in hyperconnectivity
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Effects of Algorithm Awareness - P2P Foundation

Effects of Algorithm Awareness - P2P Foundation | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
Kurt Laitner's insight:
positive affordances of privacy include an unobstructed view
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Free App Lets the Next Snowden Send Big Files Securely and Anonymously | Threat Level | WIRED

Free App Lets the Next Snowden Send Big Files Securely and Anonymously | Threat Level | WIRED | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
Onionshare is simple, free software designed to let anyone send files securely and anonymously.
Kurt Laitner's insight:

Possibly a useful tool, if you trust the publisher.

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Everything Is Broken

Everything Is Broken | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
Once upon a time, a friend of mine accidentally took over thousands of computers. He had found a vulnerability in a piec…
Kurt Laitner's insight:
great romp through security issues
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The era of Facebook is an anomaly

The era of Facebook is an anomaly | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
danah boyd’s SXSW keynote is sold out. When it’s over, a dozen fans rush the stage.

These fans aren’t young groupies hoping to get a closer glimpse at their favorite rock star, but...

Via Peter Vander Auwera
Kurt Laitner's insight:

Db on the utility of multiple personas, the practical mapping of personas to services (in my mind because those services do not provide multiple personas as a core feature - based on advertisement models they want to have a single bio person identity to aggregate against as that is the buying agent) - further commentary on the social norms baked into technology and the value of forgetful systems

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Privacy Metaphors

Privacy Metaphors | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
We are living through a privacy tipping point. Technology is dramatically changing what is possible in terms of surveillance, monitoring, persistence, analysis. We are cracking open the lid of Pa...
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Morality for Exploded Minds

Morality for Exploded Minds | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
Mike is a 2013 blogging resident visiting us from his home blog Omniorthogonal. This series of posts has explored a variety of ways in which agency – the ability of something to initiate action – can be rethought, redistributed, and refactored.
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The Three Dimensions of the Privacy Apocalypse

The Three Dimensions of the Privacy Apocalypse | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
Recent reports have revealed that several companies are currently pushing “intelligent street lights” that are capable of being loaded with various kinds of sensors including, as Reuters reported late last month, sensors for moisture, ambient...
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What is Tor and why does it matter?

What is Tor and why does it matter? | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
We all live in public, at least as far as the US National Security Agency is concerned. As Internet users and global citizens become more aware of surveillance activities that the US ...
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Groklaw - Forced Exposure ~pj

Groklaw - Forced Exposure ~pj | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
an extreme reaction, but probably the most sane one.
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Who Really Owns Your Personal Data?

Who Really Owns Your Personal Data? | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
Thanks to an exploding number of wellness apps and wearable devices, you may be beaming biodata into the cloud right now. As the Quantified Self movement picks up steam, who stands to profit?
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Why Your Next Phone Will Include Fingerprint, Facial, and Voice Recognition - Forbes

Why Your Next Phone Will Include Fingerprint, Facial, and Voice Recognition - Forbes | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
(Source: Vibe.com) What an iPhone with fingerprint scanning might look like In some ways, it’s a marvel that even half of consumers bother to lock their phones.
Kurt Laitner's insight:

Serious concerns here.  The cell phone becomes the digital identity card.  Numeric passcodes are like cash, despised by governments.  Note the FUD in the arguments for.

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Identity and Privacy

Identity and Privacy | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
The nature of identity and privacy in hyperconnectivity
Kurt Laitner's insight:

if at first you don't succeed..

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Identity Ecosystem Steering Group | NSTIC Secretariat

Identity Ecosystem Steering Group | NSTIC Secretariat | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
Kurt Laitner's insight:

Kaliya Hamlin Chaired NSTIC subcommittee  romp through identity mgt concepts

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Meet the Online Tracking Device That is Virtually Impossible to Block

Meet the Online Tracking Device That is Virtually Impossible to Block | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
A new kind of tracking tool, canvas fingerprinting, is being used to follow visitors to thousands of top websites, from WhiteHouse.gov to YouPorn.
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By Design : Our Irrefutable Right to be Remembered & Forgotten

By Design : Our Irrefutable Right to be Remembered & Forgotten | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
"Every great and just struggle you care to mention, has been necessitated in order to address a wholesale abuse of power." For years I have considered the interrelationship between power and streng...
Kurt Laitner's insight:

interesting conflation of a number of themes, influence, privacy, leadership, power etc - many questionable positions but interesting nonetheless

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Rescooped by Kurt Laitner from Cyborg Lives
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Human biology inspires "unbreakable" encryption

Human biology inspires "unbreakable" encryption | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it

Researchers at Lancaster University, UK have taken a hint from the way the human lungs and heart constantly communicate with each other, to devise an innovative, highly flexible encryption algorithm that they claim can't be broken using the traditional methods of cyberattack.

Information can be encrypted with an array of different algorithms, but the question of which method is the most secure is far from trivial. Such algorithms need a "key" to encrypt and decrypt information; the algorithms typically generate their keys using a well-known set of rules that can only admit a very large, but nonetheless finite number of possible keys. This means that in principle, given enough time and computing power, prying eyes can always break the code eventually.

The researchers, led by Dr. Tomislav Stankovski, created an encryption mechanism that can generate a truly unlimited number of keys, which they say vastly increases the security of the communication. To do so, they took inspiration from the anatomy of the human body.


Via Wildcat2030
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Angry Birds and 'leaky' phone apps targeted by NSA and GCHQ for user data

Angry Birds and 'leaky' phone apps targeted by NSA and GCHQ for user data | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
NSA and GCHQ developing capabilities to piggyback on commercial data from apps including Angry Birds for their own purposes
Kurt Laitner's insight:

I have been consistently annoyed with the privileges that mobile apps ask for, this needs to be reigned in such that I can choose which permissions to give the app, and see for myself whether the app still functions adequately without them.  Also, there is an app that monitors other apps for leakage, I think I posted here..

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Graphs by MIT Students Show the Enormously Intrusive Nature of Metadata

Graphs by MIT Students Show the Enormously Intrusive Nature of Metadata | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
You've probably heard politicians or pundits say that “metadata doesn't matter.” They argue that police and intelligence agencies shouldn't need probable cause warrants to collect information about our communications.

Via Peter Vander Auwera
Kurt Laitner's insight:

Try the tool, speaks more than my words could

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Local Police Departments Have Been Driving Fake Cell Towers Into Neighborhoods To Collect Phone Data

Local Police Departments Have Been Driving Fake Cell Towers Into Neighborhoods To Collect Phone Data | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
Kelly reports it's not clear how long the data is retained, and the secrecy with which makes it difficult to exact oversight over the departments.
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Our Government Has Weaponized the Internet. Here's How They Did It | Wired Opinion | Wired.com

Our Government Has Weaponized the Internet. Here's How They Did It | Wired Opinion | Wired.com | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
The internet backbone -- the infrastructure of networks upon which internet traffic travels -- went from being a passive infrastructure for communication to an active weapon for attacks.
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NSA surveillance: A guide to staying secure

NSA surveillance: A guide to staying secure | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
Bruce Schneier: The NSA has huge capabilities – and if it wants in to your computer, it's in. With that in mind, here are five ways we can protect ourselves
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This Week in Cybercrime: Jay-Z and Samsung Face the Music Over Data Privacy Violations - IEEE Spectrum

This Week in Cybercrime: Jay-Z and Samsung Face the Music Over Data Privacy Violations - IEEE Spectrum | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
Plus: Stock exchanges under cyberattack; India’s cybercops
Kurt Laitner's insight:

Hopefully this sets a precedent that will require app developers to have 'appropriate' access just sufficient to support the app's funtionality rather than asking for everything in return for using an app.  Of course a user can choose not to use an application because of the permissions, but they likely will not.  This is especially true of applications that are increasingly becoming 'must use' applications due to the weight of the community using them.  For example, if you had to not use google or facebook products due to disagreeing with their privacy policy would this be akin to committing social suicide, or linkedin professional suicide?  I would suggest it is much better to regulate data privacy 'over-reach' rather than expect users to opt out of pseudo-essential applications.  I can see arguments against this position of course, this is a philosphical position.  A middle ground would be to require apps to tie permissions to functionality and allow users to opt out of specific permissions and subsequently lose that aspect of the application (which assumes over-reach regulation, to separate essential access from spurious ones).  This would create a clear quid pro quo where the app developer would be required to show the cost benefit on a function to privacy release basis, clarifying the value proposition of a given app's information access requirements.

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“Stop the Cyborgs” launches public campaign against Google Glass

“Stop the Cyborgs” launches public campaign against Google Glass | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
"It destroys having multiple identities, and I find that quite a scary concept.

 

Less than two weeks ago, Seattle’s 5 Point Cafe became the first known establishment in the United States (and possibly the world) to publicly ban Google Glass, the highly anticipated augmented reality device set to be released later this year.

The “No Glass” logo that the café published on its website was developed and released (under a Creative Commons license) by a new London-based group called “Stop the Cyborgs.” The group is composed of three young Londoners who decided to make a public case against Google Glass and other similar devices.

“If it's just a few geeks wearing it, it's a niche tool [and] I don't think it's a problem,” said Adam, 27, who prefers only to be identified by his first name. He communicated with Ars via Skype and an encrypted Hushmail e-mail account.

“But if suddenly everyone is wearing it and this becomes as prevalent as smartphones—you can see it becomes very intrusive very quickly. It's not about the tech, it's about the social culture around it. If you think about what Google's business model is, it started as a search engine, and then Google Analytics. [Now, Google is] almost characterizing its [territory as being] the rest of the world. It's a loss of space that isn't online. [Google Glass] destroys having multiple identities, and I find that quite a scary concept.”

Adam admitted he has never actually used or interacted with Google Glass in person, but he said he has extensive experience with augmented reality and currently is a post-doctoral student specializing in "machine learning" at a London university that he declined to name. He added that he and two friends are behind Stop the Cyborgs.

Google has yet to release much detailed information about Google Glass, only allowing small trials involving its own employees and select journalists and developers.

"


Via Wildcat2030
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CIA admits full monitoring of Facebook and other social networks

CIA admits full monitoring of Facebook and other social networks | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it

One use that’s confirmed, however, is the manipulation of social media through the use of fake online “personas” managed by the military. Recently the US Air Force had solicited private sector vendors for something called “persona management software.” Such a technology would allow single individuals to command virtual armies of fake, digital “people” across numerous social media portals.


Via Pierre Levy
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Pierre Levy's curator insight, February 10, 2013 11:30 AM

"A fake virtual army of people could be used to help create the impression of consensus opinion in online comment threads, or manipulate social media to the point where valuable stories are suppressed."

Christophe CESETTI's curator insight, March 30, 2013 9:17 PM

this why the best social network ever is MPRL : Meet People in Real Life

Christophe CESETTI's comment, April 1, 2013 6:05 PM
NSA Whistleblower: Everyone in US under virtual surveillance, all info stored, no matter the post http://ow.ly/jDYRl via @mbauwens
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Google Experiments with a Ring that Acts as Your Password | MIT Technology Review

Google Experiments with a Ring that Acts as Your Password | MIT Technology Review | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
The world’s largest search engine is now experimenting with jewelry that would eliminate the need to remember dozens of passwords.
Kurt Laitner's insight:

we looked at this as a way to manage digital rights for a media server we developed in 2000, but this is taking it even further and making it 'wearable' encourages always nearby behavior - some concerns here

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