Ideas from and for MAKERS
157 views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Victor Jimenez
onto Ideas from and for MAKERS
Scoop.it!

Innovation Management IS Your Business | Switch and Shift

Innovation Management IS Your Business | Switch and Shift | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
While the old saying, "If it isn't broken, don't fix it" makes for a great sound bite, it can cause irreparable harm to a company's ability to remain competitive if adopted as an operating philosophy.
Victor Jimenez's insight:

I can't think of a better way to start a conversation on the value of Knowledge Management than how innovation is presented in this article.

more...
Marie Jeffery's curator insight, February 20, 2014 10:52 AM

Victor, thanks for sharing this valuable insight.

Ideas from and for MAKERS
A space for curating ideas and topics that could provide the spark for the next big thing!
Curated by Victor Jimenez
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Victor Jimenez from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

This 'breakthrough' protein glue could save lives in emergencies

This 'breakthrough' protein glue could save lives in emergencies | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it

Australian and American biomedical engineers have developed a stretchy surgical glue that rapidly heals wounds, a "breakthrough" that has the potential to save lives in emergencies, its designers say.

 

The injectable glue, MeTro, is based on a naturally occurring protein called tropaelastin. It is applied directly to the wound and is then activated with UV light to form a complete seal, eliminating the need for staples or stitches. Its elasticity means it's designed to work well on shape-changing internal organs like the lungs and heart.

 

A study published in journal Science Translational Medicine showed the glue quickly and successfully sealed incisions in the arteries and lungs of rodents and the lungs of pigs.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Victor Jimenez's insight:
Share your insight
more...
Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, October 6, 3:19 PM

An emergency fix that really stick to yah!/What's gluing in health tody? 

Scooped by Victor Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Automated vehicles and the role of 5G

Automated vehicles and the role of 5G | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
Fully automated vehicles (AVs) — commonly known as driverless vehicles — are quickly becoming a reality. A study issued by the World Economic Forum projects 10 percent of vehicles in the U.S. will be driverless by 2026. This is due, in part, to enabling technologies making rapid gains in sophistication and adoption.
Victor Jimenez's insight:
Driverless cars are coming, but in pieces at first. 

From the article… 
“A study issued by the World Economic Forum projects 10 percent of vehicles in the U.S. will be driverless by 2026.” 

This may be slower than some may think, or faster, depending on your take. But I think we should keep our eye on the other tech in our cars, rather than the fact that there is not a driver behind the steering wheel. Think of the infrastructure that will need to be present to maintain a reliable network connection between your vehicle and the connected pathways you decide to take to and from your destination. Actually, maybe you don’t decide your route after all? Who decides then? An algorithm based on the latest updates from Waze? GoogleMaps? How reliable for predicting route time are these apps now? Would they be improved if similar apps had more data streams to feed on forced by regulation of automated vehicles (AV)? 

More from the article… 
“Onboard sensors are arguably the most critical enabling technology. They are vital to helping automated vehicles make sense of their environment and surroundings. Onboard processing allows vehicles to take the data inputs from sensors and act on them to guide vehicles’ operations on the road.” 

“Vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communications will also be coming to both human driven vehicles and highly automated vehicles in the coming years. This will allow AVs to “see” and receive data directly from other vehicles and road infrastructure beyond what their onboard sensors can perceive…” 

Undoubtedly we will start seeing pieces of the future infrastructure for AVs creeping into our next generation of “connected vehicles” and highway or city traffic control systems. 

What is your bet? What is the next new vehicle feature we will see that will end up being a basic version of a critical piece of the AV infrastructure of the future? 

And by the way, will there still be a steering wheel?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victor Jimenez
Scoop.it!

StumbleUpon

StumbleUpon | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
StumbleUpon is the easiest way to discover new and interesting web pages, photos and videos across the Web.
Victor Jimenez's insight:
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victor Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Watching artificial intelligence teach itself how to walk is weirdly captivating

Watching artificial intelligence teach itself how to walk is weirdly captivating | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
Researchers from Singapore and British Columbia have used reinforcement learning to create an AI which learns to walk through trial and error.
Victor Jimenez's insight:
Captivating indeed. Why did I have to watch the whole video? I felt myself routing for the little leg guy. Comon, you can do it! Just take your time on that ice...

Direct Link to video on Youtube: https://youtu.be/G4lT9CLyCNw
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victor Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Blockchain: Massively Simplified | Richie Etwaru | TEDxMorristown

Richie Etwaru, discusses the opportunity and implications of blockchain as a paradigm to slow/chose the expanding trust gap in commerce. He unpack
Victor Jimenez's insight:
More on blockchain. Captivating speaker.
"Which tangerine would you buy?"
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victor Jimenez
Scoop.it!

What’s Taking So Long for Driverless Cars to Go Mainstream?

What’s Taking So Long for Driverless Cars to Go Mainstream? | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
We have the technology we need for driverless cars. So what's taking so long for autonomous vehicles to go mainstream?
Victor Jimenez's insight:
Who is accountable when a self-driving car makes a choice resulting in a crash? How will we judge machine error? Do we hold Artificial Intelligence to the same standard as a person? To a higher standard? Deciding how we evaluate and engage within some of our complex systems says a lot about ourselves. Do you know how most medicines work? Do you understand how they are made? But many people will be happy to ingest drugs if they have received FDA approval or if 9 out of 10 doctors agree...

How far off do you think we really are from allowing self-driving vehicles on our roads?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victor Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Acoustic levitation

Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory have discovered a way to use sound waves to levitate individual droplets of solutions containing differen
Victor Jimenez's insight:
Share your insight
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victor Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Voice Is the Next Big Platform, and Alexa Will Own It

Voice Is the Next Big Platform, and Alexa Will Own It | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
If you happen to live in one of the six million US homes that have so far purchased an Amazon Echo, you may think Alexa is just a voice emanating from a cylindrical speaker that knows a couple of…
Victor Jimenez's insight:
We are at the end of another year and looking forward to 2017 I sincerely hope that adoption and quality of voice navigation will grow significantly. The race to develop a chatbot that can understand us continues and teams are working to adjust technology to adapt to the patterns of people. But I wonder when we finally have successful conversant chatbots, orAI even, and we look back to examine what made it happen...how much will people have adapted to understand the technology?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victor Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Because it's Friday: A robot writes a movie

What happens when you take the scripts from dozens of sci-fi movies and TV series, and feed them (along with a couple of seed prompts) into a long short-term memory recurrent neural network? You get this bizarre screenplay, with dialogue for three characters (named H, H, and C -- one of the H's had to be renamed H2) and stage directions like C Well, I have to go to the skull. I don't know. He picks up a light screen and fights the security force of the particles of a transmission on his face. Director Oscar Sharp assembled
Victor Jimenez's insight:
Something strange.... I cannot tell if it is just the director's influence and the actors doing their delivery well that gets me drawn in or if there is something to the words that hints at a story behind all the madness.. Either way, a screenplay written by a neural network and it somehow comes together?? Am I shocked and amazed or just left wondering what I just watched???? I still cannot tell..
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victor Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Electronic devices that melt in your brain | KurzweilAI

Electronic devices that melt in your brain | KurzweilAI | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
Illustration of the construction of a bioresorbable neural electrode array for ECoG and subdermal EEG measurements. A photolithographically patterned, n-doped
Victor Jimenez's insight:
"Wetware" here we come!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victor Jimenez
Scoop.it!

The Untold Story of Magic Leap, the World’s Most Secretive Startup

The Untold Story of Magic Leap, the World’s Most Secretive Startup | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
Virtual reality is posed to become a fundamental technology, and outfits like Magic Leap have an opportunity to become some of the largest companies ever.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victor Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Google: We have proof that our quantum computer really works

Google: We have proof that our quantum computer really works | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
Google announced a breakthrough in the field of quantum computing Wednesday. 
Victor Jimenez's insight:

OOohh. Is this going to be the big break for AI? More reading is needed!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victor Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Mars: The Planet that Lost an Ocean’s Worth of Water

Mars: The Planet that Lost an Ocean’s Worth of Water | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
A primitive ocean on Mars held more water than Earth’s Arctic Ocean, and covered a greater portion of the planet’s surface than the Atlantic Ocean does on Earth, according to new results published today. An international team of scientists used ESO’s Very Large Telescope, along with instruments at the W. M. Keck Observatory and the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, to monitor the atmosphere of the planet and map out the properties of the water in different parts of Mars’s atmosphere over a six-y
Victor Jimenez's insight:

Not a MAKER post, but one for those explorers/adventurers. Funny...Mars with water reminds me of the Firefox browser icon!

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victor Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Microsoft’s new coding language is made for quantum computers

Microsoft’s new coding language is made for quantum computers | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
topological quantum
Victor Jimenez's insight:
Microsoft is effectively building a language for computers that don't really exist yet.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victor Jimenez
Scoop.it!

3 Questions about Artificial Intelligence and the Military

AI has moved from the movies to the laboratory, and governments around the world want it in their arsenals. We need to know how militaries define it, an
Victor Jimenez's insight:
Are we making Skynet or Johnny 5? Will other countries' control AI use the same as we do? Some think AI is a threat, others think it is an opportunity.

From the article...

AI has moved from the movies to the laboratory, and governments around the world want it in their arsenals. We asked how militaries define it, and how they intend to keep it under control. Following the lead of companies like Amazon and Google, commercial interest in artificial intelligence is skyrocketing. And so has demand among some of the world’s most advanced militaries — the gatekeepers of what alarmists call “killer robots.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victor Jimenez
Scoop.it!

A new use for Google Glass: Helping children with autism

A new use for Google Glass: Helping children with autism | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
Stanford University developed facial recognition software that runs on Google Glass that can be used as a therapy tool for children with autism.
Victor Jimenez's insight:
Bringing technology into the home for a better purpose than just entertainment or convenience...

I watched VICE on HBO, Show #74 (season 5, edition 20)
“Autism Under the Lens” and I found out about the Autism Glass Project. (http://autismglass.stanford.edu/)

Learning about the Autism Glass Project inspires me. It is good to see people coming together to make an impact and where the return is so great.

Checkout the Autism Glass Project at http://autismglass.stanford.edu/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victor Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Strong and elastic spider silk can help retrain nerves to grow after damage

Strong and elastic spider silk can help retrain nerves to grow after damage | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
Spider silk may have an invaluable role to play in repairing extensive nerve injuries, according to researchers in Austria.
Victor Jimenez's insight:
From the article...
Spider silk could help treat nerve damage by training new nerves where to grow. Spider silk is very strong, but also very elastic, which aren’t common properties to find together...

Read on to find out more...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victor Jimenez
Scoop.it!

What is blockchain?

http://www.weforum.org/
Victor Jimenez's insight:
From the video:
 "Blockchain will become a decentralized source of trust..."
"Creating a record whose authenticity can be verified by the entire community..."
"...and third party trust organizations may no longer be necessary..."

Think about this when you are discussing the future with your circle of friends and are exploring those what-if questions on how to make a better future.

Think on this. Is blockchain technology something you need to be aware of?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victor Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Continental takes CUbE to Frankfurt for self-driving trials

Continental takes CUbE to Frankfurt for self-driving trials | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
Continental, which also has concepts designed to improve in-car audio and security, will be running a concept autonomous car around its Frankfurt facility to try and fine-tune the way driverless cars navigate the complex city environment.
Victor Jimenez's insight:
Would you step into public transportation without seeing a human driver at the wheel? Continental is moving forward in some German metro areas with self-driving public transportation options thinking that many people will. Thinking about how long a vehicle sits idle during the day does spark what-if questions and interest in the sharing economy.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victor Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Steelcase MIT Rapid Liquid Printing in Furniture

In collaboration with Skylar Tibbits’ Self Assembly Lab at MIT, Steelcase has unveiled a new method of 3D printing called “rapid liquid printing”
Victor Jimenez's insight:
3D printing time reduced. Gravity removed. What could you make?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victor Jimenez
Scoop.it!

The technology behind Aquila

The technology behind Aquila | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
Victor Jimenez's insight:
Facebook's Aquila, the solar airplane designed to bring internet access to people living in remote locations. Checkout the test flight video at: https://www.facebook.com/facebook/videos/10154835146021729/
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victor Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Jibo Releases SDK Aiming to Bring Robotics into Homes

IndieGogo startup Jibo has announced an SDK for developing applications, a.k.a. skills, for its “social robot” for the home, which will target entertainment, education, and IoT integration.
Victor Jimenez's insight:
The team at JIBO seem to have something special here. This is the first social robot that I've seen that did not make me immediately laugh at how strange or silly it appeared. Instead, I found myself intrigued by it's fluid but quirky movements and responsive animations on a flat faced screen. The face recognition paired with movement seems to be they key that brings these beings to life and made me wonder, for just a moment, if there is some real spark inside them. JIBO definately has something to watch here. Remember the name JIBO, this little guy will be popping up soon!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Victor Jimenez
Scoop.it!

Blockchain’s mysterious origin and promising future

Blockchain’s mysterious origin and promising future | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
The origin of Bitcoin sounds like the plot of a far-fetched thriller. It opens with a nine page whitepaper published by an anonymous scientist (or is it scientists?) under the pen name of Satoshi
Victor Jimenez's insight:
Blockchain sounds like it could be one of those ideas that in 20 years it is so much of a foundational concept, that we all wonder what came before it.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Victor Jimenez from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

How to make machines learn like humans

How to make machines learn like humans | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it

A team of scientists has developed an algorithm that captures human learning abilities, enabling computers to recognize and draw simple visual concepts that are mostly indistinguishable from those created by humans.


The work by researchers at MIT, New York University, and the University of Toronto, which appears in the latest issue of the journal Science, marks a significant advance in the field — one that dramatically shortens the time it takes computers to “learn” new concepts and broadens their application to more creative tasks, according to the researchers.


“Our results show that by reverse-engineering how people think about a problem, we can develop better algorithms,” explains Brenden Lake, a Moore-Sloan Data Science Fellow at New York University and the paper’s lead author. “Moreover, this work points to promising methods to narrow the gap for other machine-learning tasks.”


The paper’s other authors are Ruslan Salakhutdinov, an assistant professor of Computer Science at the University of Toronto, and Joshua Tenenbaum, a professor at MIT in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and the Center for Brains, Minds and Machines.


When humans are exposed to a new concept — such as new piece of kitchen equipment, a new dance move, or a new letter in an unfamiliar alphabet — they often need only a few examples to understand its make-up and recognize new instances. But machines typically need to be given hundreds or thousands of examples to perform with similar accuracy.


“It has been very difficult to build machines that require as little data as humans when learning a new concept,” observes Salakhutdinov. “Replicating these abilities is an exciting area of research connecting machine learning, statistics, computer vision, and cognitive science.”


Salakhutdinov helped to launch recent interest in learning with “deep neural networks,” in a paper published in Science almost 10 years ago with his doctoral advisor Geoffrey Hinton. Their algorithm learned the structure of 10 handwritten character concepts — the digits 0-9 — from 6,000 examples each, or a total of 60,000 training examples.


In the work appearing in Science this week, the researchers sought to shorten the learning process and make it more akin to the way humans acquire and apply new knowledge: learning from a small number of examples and performing a range of tasks, such as generating new examples of a concept or generating whole new concepts.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Victor Jimenez from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Scientists have discovered a new state of matter, called 'Jahn-Teller metals'

Scientists have discovered a new state of matter, called 'Jahn-Teller metals' | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it

An international team of scientists has announced the discovery of a new state of matter in a material that appears to be an insulator, superconductor, metal and magnet all rolled into one, saying that it could lead to the development of more effective high-temperature superconductors.


Why is this so exciting? Well, if these properties are confirmed, this new state of matter will allow scientists to better understand why some materials have the potential to achieve superconductivity at a relativity high critical temperature (Tc) - "high" as in −135 °C as opposed to −243.2 °C. Because superconductivity allows a material to conduct electricity without resistance, which means no heat, sound, or any other form of energy release, achieving this would revolutionise how we use and produce energy, but it’s only feasible if we can achieve it at so-called high temperatures.


As Michael Byrne explains, when we talk about states of matter, it’s not just solids, liquids, gases, and maybe plasmas that we have to think about. We also have to consider the more obscure states that don’t occur in nature, but are rather created in the lab - Bose–Einstein condensate, degenerate matter, supersolids and superfluids, and quark-gluon plasma, for example. 


By introducing rubidium into carbon-60 molecules - more commonly known as 'buckyballs' - a team led by chemist Kosmas Prassides from Tokohu University in Japan was able to change the distance between them, which forced them into a new, crystalline structure. When put through an array of tests, this structure displayed a combination of insulating, superconducting, metallic, and magnetic phases, including a brand new one, which the researchers have named 'Jahn-Teller metals'. 


Named after the Jahn-Teller effect, which is used in chemistry to describe how at low pressures, the geometric arrangement of molecules and ions in an electronic state can become distorted, this new state of matter allows scientists to transform an insulator - which can’t conduct electricity - into a conductor by simply applying pressure.


There’s a whole lot of lab-work to be done before this discovery will mean anything for practical energy production in the real world, but that’s science for you. And it’s got people excited already, as chemist Elisabeth Nicol from the University of Guelph in Canada told Hamish Johnston at PhysicsWorld: "Understanding the mechanisms at play and how they can be manipulated to change the Tc surely will inspire the development of new superconducting materials".


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.